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USMC Garand Belt

Article about: G'day All not sure on this one - British made or a repro?

  1. #1

    Default USMC Garand Belt

    G'day All

    not sure on this one - British made or a repro?
    Regards
    René

  2. #2
    NCA
    NCA is offline
    ?

    Default Re: USMC Garand Belt

    The colour of the webbing looks alot like british made to me..
    Dont know about brits making gear for the USMC though..
    Also looks too well made for repro.

    Do you have M.Brayleys book on us web equipment?

  3. #3

    Default Re: USMC Garand Belt

    Quote by NCA View Post
    The colour of the webbing looks alot like british made to me..
    Dont know about brits making gear for the USMC though..
    Also looks too well made for repro.

    Do you have M.Brayleys book on us web equipment?
    Cheers NCA,

    I've also noticed the cutter marks too which is a good sign.
    No I don't have the book you mention.
    Regards
    René

  4. #4

    Default Re: USMC Garand Belt

    Could be Canadian made???? the reason I think it's not US made is the weave, here's some comparisons - British & Canadian. I have never seen Canadian lend lease gear before or knew it existed
    Regards
    René

  5. #5

    Default Re: USMC Garand Belt

    Any way here's my others
    Regards
    René

  6. #6
    ?

    Default Re: USMC Garand Belt

    Hi Rene,
    I'm not sure on this one, as you've stated this is not of U.S. production as the belt has eyelets at the base, instead of the Grommets which were used as standard on all U.S. models I seen, again its not a British contract as the fittings were different, so you got me a little puzzled as a foot note are there any markings or makers details on the Lift the DOT's. Also on the subject of the webbing and weave, both U.S and British webbing items were based on systems designed by the Mills Woven Webbing Equipment company both at there original American factories and then latter on at the British subsidiary Mills Equipment Co, both WW1 webbing systems used the same types and class of webbing I.E. Class I Type I (Panel webbing) , Class I type III (strap webbing) etc, Britain stuck with these types/styles for both the 1908 and 1937 pattern equipment and right up into the 1950's, the Americans however in the inter war years carried on using Class I Type I (Panel webbing) up until the 1960's, but change to using Class III type I (strap webbing) as this has a double yarn reinforced edge which in turn doubles the strain weight and strength of the strap, and is why the American WW2 strap webbing has that distinctive beaded edge to the weave.

    A few examples of U.S Items made with Class I type I are

    Thompson Pouches 20 x 5 and 3 x 30rd (USMC contracts)

    M1923 Rifle Belts

    M1923 .45 auto mag pouches

    M1941, M1942 First aid pouches

    M1936 wire cutters pouch (some contracts only)

    Pre-war and early production 50 and 100 rd Thompson drum magazine pouches (Mills & Russel etc)



    Nige.
    "Now, I've designed this like a collapsing bag ! "

  7. #7

    Default Re: USMC Garand Belt

    Quote by Nige H View Post
    Hi Rene,
    I'm not sure on this one, as you've stated this is not of U.S. production as the belt has eyelets at the base, instead of the Grommets which were used as standard on all U.S. models I seen, again its not a British contract as the fittings were different, so you got me a little puzzled as a foot note are there any markings or makers details on the Lift the DOT's. Also on the subject of the webbing and weave, both U.S and British webbing items were based on systems designed by the Mills Woven Webbing Equipment company both at there original American factories and then latter on at the British subsidiary Mills Equipment Co, both WW1 webbing systems used the same types and class of webbing I.E. Class I Type I (Panel webbing) , Class I type III (strap webbing) etc, Britain stuck with these types/styles for both the 1908 and 1937 pattern equipment and right up into the 1950's, the Americans however in the inter war years carried on using Class I Type I (Panel webbing) up until the 1960's, but change to using Class III type I (strap webbing) as this has a double yarn reinforced edge which in turn doubles the strain weight and strength of the strap, and is why the American WW2 strap webbing has that distinctive beaded edge to the weave.

    A few examples of U.S Items made with Class I type I are

    Thompson Pouches 20 x 5 and 3 x 30rd (USMC contracts)

    M1923 Rifle Belts

    M1923 .45 auto mag pouches

    M1941, M1942 First aid pouches

    M1936 wire cutters pouch (some contracts only)

    Pre-war and early production 50 and 100 rd Thompson drum magazine pouches (Mills & Russel etc)



    Nige.
    Thinks Nige for you're in-depth reply.
    No markings on the lift a dot fasteners
    Regards
    René

  8. #8
    ?

    Default Re: USMC Garand Belt

    Hi Rene,
    looking at this and the other points that I raised regards the eyelets, I would say this is a reproduction belt probably made in the far east, the DOT back plates are nether the WWII original design or the current style so it looks as if the fasteners as nock off ones from China which again most repro's use as genuine Scovil Lift the DOT's are very pricey, also its not a British made belt as I've checked through my reference material, and the British made examples have the M1910 rifle belt type of woven puckered pockets, which can only be produced on a programmable Dobby shuttle loom.

    Nigel.
    "Now, I've designed this like a collapsing bag ! "

  9. #9

    Default Re: USMC Garand Belt

    Quote by Nige H View Post
    Hi Rene,
    looking at this and the other points that I raised regards the eyelets, I would say this is a reproduction belt probably made in the far east, the DOT back plates are nether the WWII original design or the current style so it looks as if the fasteners as nock off ones from China which again most repro's use as genuine Scovil Lift the DOT's are very pricey, also its not a British made belt as I've checked through my reference material, and the British made examples have the M1910 rifle belt type of woven puckered pockets, which can only be produced on a programmable Dobby shuttle loom.



    Nigel.
    Cheers Nige, I had my suspicions thanks for clearing it up
    Regards
    René

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