Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Web Eqmᵀ Markings of the British Empire

Article about: The broad arrow has been used in Britain to indicate government property since at least the seventeenth century. By the twentieth century, it was used across the British Empire to denote the

  1. #1
    ?

    Default Web Eqmᵀ Markings of the British Empire

    The broad arrow has been used in Britain to indicate government property since at least the seventeenth century. By the twentieth century, it was used across the British Empire to denote the property of the various dominions and colonies. Web equipment was no exception and, in addition to maker marks and dates, featured a wide variety of ownership and inspection marks.

    BRITISH GOVERNMENT ACCEPTANCE MARK
    The broad arrow came in various styles and differed significantly between British webbing manufacturers. Shown here is the classic broad arrow design used on webbing made by the Mills Equipment Company since before the Great War.

    Name:  Great Britain (1942) (400x400).jpg
Views: 500
Size:  151.5 KB Name:  1374228_676041959073054_136005175_n (300x150).jpg
Views: 605
Size:  49.8 KB


    UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA OWNERSHIP MARK
    South African webbing was marked with a broad arrow inside the letter ‘U’, which stood for the Union. These marks were often stamped in red ink like the one pictured which comes from a 1945-dated South African basic pouch.

    Name:  South Africa (1945) (400x400).jpg
Views: 504
Size:  135.3 KB Name:  1384112_676042125739704_624505388_n (300x200).jpg
Views: 425
Size:  29.4 KB


    BRITISH INDIA OWNERSHIP MARK
    Webbing supplied to India from the motherland (and later produced by Indian firms) bore a broad arrow surmounting the letter ‘I’. This particular stamp comes from a 1941-dated three-piece belt.

    Name:  India (1941) (399x400).jpg
Views: 496
Size:  143.9 KB Name:  1391871_676042352406348_783378496_n (300x150).jpg
Views: 407
Size:  41.5 KB


    COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA OWNERSHIP MARK
    Australian webbing often had a broad arrow flanked on both sides by the letter ‘D’, which stood for Department of Defence. This stamp comes from a 1943-dated Australian L-strap.

    Name:  Australia (1943) (400x400).jpg
Views: 493
Size:  124.6 KB Name:  1381799_676042482406335_1556678480_n (300x150).jpg
Views: 386
Size:  40.9 KB


    DOMINION OF CANADA OWNERSHIP MARK
    Canadian webbing was marked with a broad arrow surrounded by the Letter ‘C’. This Canadian broad arrow comes from a 1941 dated officer’s haversack.

    Name:  Canada (1941) (400x400).jpg
Views: 651
Size:  149.5 KB Name:  1395260_676042722406311_394205754_n (300x150).jpg
Views: 398
Size:  40.9 KB


    ROYAL NAVY OWNERSHIP MARK
    Naval webbing was often marked with the letter ‘N’ with a broad arrow above and an inspector number below. This form of ownership mark appears to have been in use from 1920 to 1937, when it was replaced by a smaller version that was ultimately discontinued in 1939. This navy ownership mark comes from a 1923-dated pattern 1919 cutlass frog.

    Name:  Royal Navy (1923) (399x400).jpg
Views: 583
Size:  128.2 KB Name:  1374834_676042905739626_1326308738_n (300x150).jpg
Views: 383
Size:  35.3 KB


    ROYAL AIR FORCE OWNERSHIP MARK
    Webbing manufactured for the Royal Air Force was often marked with a king’s crown surmounting the letters ‘A’ and ‘M’, for ‘Air Ministry’. This RAF ownership mark comes from a 1941-dated pattern 1937 brace attachment.

    Name:  DSC06015 (398x400).jpg
Views: 437
Size:  172.3 KB Name:  1378000_676043022406281_613362597_n (300x150).jpg
Views: 416
Size:  42.0 KB


    INSPECTION MARK (GREAT BRITAIN)
    British inspection marks during the Great War usually featured a broad arrow, surmounting a dot, above an inspector number. This can be seen in the mark depicted, which comes from a 1919-dated pattern 1908 belt.

    Name:  I Great Britain (1919) (399x400).jpg
Views: 506
Size:  154.6 KB Name:  1374228_676041959073054_136005175_n (300x150).jpg
Views: 605
Size:  49.8 KB


    INSPECTION MARK (GREAT BRITAIN)
    Inspection marks on British webbing at the start of the Second World War often featured a broad arrow, surmounting an inspector number, above the letter ‘U’. This form of inspector mark continued into 1941 and was exclusively seen on items produced by Mills Equipment Company. The pictured pattern 1908 brace has an inspection mark of this type and was manufactured in 1940.

    Name:  I Great Britain (1940) (400x400).jpg
Views: 431
Size:  129.6 KB Name:  1374228_676041959073054_136005175_n (300x150).jpg
Views: 605
Size:  49.8 KB


    INSPECTION MARK (GREAT BRITAIN)
    Inspection marks consisting of a broad arrow above an inspector number were common throughout the Second World War. The mark shown comes from a 1941-dated British bayonet frog.

    Name:  I Great Britain (1941) (400x399).jpg
Views: 410
Size:  164.3 KB Name:  1374228_676041959073054_136005175_n (300x150).jpg
Views: 605
Size:  49.8 KB


    INSPECTION MARK (SOUTH AFRICA)
    South African Inspection marks commonly featured an inspector number next to a South African broad arrow. The pictured mark comes from a 1942-dated South African haversack.

    Name:  I South Africa 2 (1942) (400x400).jpg
Views: 431
Size:  136.5 KB Name:  1384112_676042125739704_624505388_n (300x200).jpg
Views: 425
Size:  29.4 KB


    INSPECTION MARK (INDIA)
    Indian inspection marks typically consisted of a broad arrow with a single letter to the left and a two or three digit inspector number to the right. This mark comes from an Indian pattern 1937 belt made in 1942.

    Name:  I India (1942) (400x400).jpg
Views: 417
Size:  144.4 KB Name:  1391871_676042352406348_783378496_n (300x150).jpg
Views: 407
Size:  41.5 KB


    INSPECTION MARK (AUSTRALIA)
    Inspection marks on Australian webbing often consisted of a one or two letter code surmounted by a broad arrow. These marks were usually stamped in purple or black ink, like the one pictured which comes from a 1942-dated Australian haversack.

    Name:  I Australia 2 (1942) (399x400).jpg
Views: 414
Size:  135.6 KB Name:  1381799_676042482406335_1556678480_n (300x150).jpg
Views: 386
Size:  40.9 KB


    SOLD OUT OF SERVICE MARK
    When webbing was sold out of British military service, it was often stamped with two opposing broad arrows. This sale mark comes from a 1916-dated haversack.

    Name:  Sold out of Service Mark (1916) (400x400).jpg
Views: 417
Size:  129.9 KB Name:  1374228_676041959073054_136005175_n (300x150).jpg
Views: 605
Size:  49.8 KB

  2. #2
    MAP
    MAP is offline
    ?

    Default

    Nice thread. Putting it in my reference folder!

    Michael
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  3. #3

    Default

    Fantastic reference

  4. #4

    Default

    Excellent job as always Karkee.

    Ben

  5. #5
    ?

    Default

    I'm thrilled that you guys found this post helpful!

    I hope that future webbing collectors will stumble on it and find it useful too!

  6. #6
    ?

    Default

    Well done!

Similar Threads

  1. British Empire Webbing

    In Equipment and Field gear
    10-02-2017, 01:25 PM
  2. Shell Dressings of the British Empire

    In Equipment and Field gear
    02-01-2015, 04:30 AM
  3. The First Shot Of The British Empire, 1914

    In WW1 Allies: Great Britain, France, USA, etc 1914 - 1918
    08-04-2014, 11:48 PM
  4. 05-21-2014, 08:47 AM
  5. WWI British OBE (Order of the British Empire)

    In Orders, medals and decorations
    09-09-2012, 11:24 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •