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Gebirgsjäger Artillery Training Company Battalion 99 - Erkennungsmarke

Article about: Picked up this Gebirgsjäger dog tag at the weekend. I take it to be from a Ausbildung Kompanie Gebirgsjäger Ersatz und Artillerie Battalion 99 (Training Company Gebirgsjäger Replacement and

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    Default Gebirgsjäger Artillery Training Company Battalion 99 - Erkennungsmarke

    Picked up this Gebirgsjäger dog tag at the weekend. I take it to be from a Ausbildung Kompanie Gebirgsjäger Ersatz und Artillerie Battalion 99 (Training Company Gebirgsjäger Replacement and Artillery Battalion 99) shrunk down Gebirgsjäger artillery training company belonging to Gebirgsjäger Regiment 99. Looked through "Lekikon der Wehrmacht" not been able to find the unit. Does any member have any further information ? am I reading it wrong ?
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    Yup Alec, you're just reading it slightly wrong; 'E. u. A.' is simply 'Ersatz- und Ausbildungs'- no 'Artillerie' in there. In 1942 I think it was, the Ersatzheer separated what were previously just Ersatz-Bataillone into Ersat-Bataillone and Ersatz- und Ausbildungs-Bataillone; one presumably doing more specific training than the other.

    I don't know specifically what the Ausbildungs-Kompanie was, but it may well have been just a 'paper' designation, like the Stammkompanie, rather than a physical group.

    So you can probably find what you're interested in by looking up Gebirgsjäger-Ersatz-Bataillon 99, and that should include the A-u E version as well. Really the most significant thing it means is that you can date the disc to after the time the unit was divided.

    It's quite a nice disc
    Ohhhhh- pillage then burn...

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    Hello Matt,
    Thanks for the post. To be frank of all the posts I may or may not have got on this dog tag, yours was the one I was looking out for. You are, of course right, I did find Gebirgsjäger-Ersatz- Batallion 99 in the Lexikon, a short piece but packed with information. According to the Lexikon this particular unit came into existence quite late, 20th July 1944, which focuses the dog tag date into a 10 month window. Thinking about the Ausbildungs-Kompanie, could it be a training company for trainers ? after all army PTI's have to be trained up, teachers trained,

    Here's a line from Lexikon der Wehrmacht
    "Das Ersatz-Bataillon wurde am 20. Juli 1944 zum Gebirgs-Jäger-Ersatz- und Ausbildungs-Bataillon 99 erweitert. "

    Again thanks for the help.

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    Quote by Matt L View Post
    [...]
    I don't know specifically what the Ausbildungs-Kompanie was, but it may well have been just a 'paper' designation, like the Stammkompanie, rather than a physical group.
    [...]
    Simply saying, it was a real "organism" - Ausbildungs-Kompanie (training company) was the unit responsible for training of the inducted untrained volunteers.

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    Cool- I was hoping you were still around Stacez

    So how does that differ from a numbered Kompanie then? All recruits are untrained and yet some go to the 1. Kompanie, etc.- and to see 'Ausbildungs Kompanie' on a disc is actually extremely uncommon...
    Ohhhhh- pillage then burn...

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    Matt L, I'm still around, maybe with a bit less time due to my 5-month old son

    The typical infantry replacement battalion (Infanterie-Ersatz-Bataillon) before Autumn 1942 was consisted of:
    - staff;
    - reception company (Stammkompanie);
    - 4 training companies (Ausbildungskompanie), the 4th was a machine gun training coy;
    - convalescent coy (Genesendenkompanie);
    - transfer coy (Marschkompanie).
    This structure applies to the other arm branches as well.

    In Autumn 1942, the "big split" occurred - pure trainings functions were separated from the pure replacement roles. Thus, original Infanterie-Ersatz-Bataillon was divided into two parts: one to handle only replacement matters (with designation "Ersatz") and the second to take care of training (with designation "Ausbildungs" or "Reserve"). These two new battalions were, in most cases, physically separated from each other. It was connected with movements of replacement units due to war progress and seizing and occupation of new territories. However, many units were not moved, they remained in their original home stations and they were not physically separated. They took a form of combined units - to handle the replacement and training at the same unit. These get designation "Ersatz und Ausbildungs".

    This is the example we have here. So, coming finally to your question Matt L, if we take a look of the structure of Gebirgsjäger-Ersatz- und Ausbildungs-Bataillon 99
    Infanterie-Ersatz-Bataillon 99 - Lexikon der Wehrmacht
    we can see four numbered coys: 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th. Behind the numbers, the designations of these coys is hidden. In order to fulfill replacement and training role of Gebirgsjäger-Ersatz- und Ausbildungs-Bataillon 99, these four numbered companies should be as follows:
    - 1st - reception coy;
    - 2nd - training coy,
    - 4th - convalescent coy;
    - 5th - transfer coy.
    In this particular case, on the EKM is written only name of coy ("Ausbildungs"), so I'm pretty sure it's the 2nd coy if you use numbers instead of coys' designations.

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    You're an absolute font of useful knowledge when it comes to unit structures Stacez- thanks very much! And congratulations on your new family addition- I can see how that will take much of your attention of late

    So the rarity is simply that the disc is marked 'Ausb. Kp.' instead of just '2./'; and all those from an A.-u. E-Btl. one might see that have a number actually indicate a type rather than being truly just a numbered Kompanie. I had always wondered exactly what the difference between the 'new' units after the split entailed- but I've never found the KStNs for Ersatz-type units.
    Ohhhhh- pillage then burn...

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    Matt L, you're welcome and thank you!

    I attached manning table of Gebirgsjäger-Ausbildungs-Kompanie (KStN 6073):

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    The interesting part is circled in red. In the first column we can see number of officers (4), then NCOs (26) and finally privates (265). Look how many conscripts such company had! 265! It was really quite big unit.

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    Oh that's brilliant Stacez- another thing I'd always wondered about is just how many recruits would be in a typical Ersatz (or Ausbildungs) Kompanie. So it's twice the size of a typical combat Kompanie- that is certainly big.
    Ohhhhh- pillage then burn...

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    Hi AlecH,

    it's my dog tag you've discovered! I choose my name because of my"opa" who served in this unit. 13 days in april 45, he was 16 1/2 years old. I have his dog tag and soldbuch. He was taken prisoner in the Ringschnait/Biberach area. But i didn't find so much informations for that time.

    Cheers

    Vincent

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