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A question.

Article about: Would a British soldier today be disiplined for carrying a FS knife as it is not regular, or would they be allowed to as an augment of personal kit ?

  1. #1
    hog
    hog is offline
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    Default A question.

    Would a British soldier today be disiplined for carrying a FS knife as it is not regular, or would they be allowed to as an augment of personal kit ?
    Many thanks.
    Last edited by hog; 12-13-2015 at 02:57 PM.

  2. #2

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    Interesting question. I wish I had an answer.
    gregM
    Live to ride -- Ride to live

    I was addicted to the "Hokey-Pokey" but I've turned
    myself around.

  3. #3

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    I think it depends on how much of a stick up his butt that his Sargeant or Officer has.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  4. #4
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    British???? US forces, In the sandbox carrying of personal edged weapons was an option.

    Semper Fi
    Phil

  5. #5

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    In the first instance it would depend on the circumstances.
    On the one hand it is not issue kit so according to the rules it should not be carried but this would not result in disciplinary sanction rather one would be told not to carry it or if circumstance warranted it might be confiscated. If at home in UK or overseas not on operations then UK or local law would apply and anything not issued and carried in accordance with the requirements of duty is likely to be interpreted as an "offensive weapon" under the law and therefore a criminal offence per se.

    However, in the field on operations overseas this would be less of an issue unless there were other factors eg carrying a "Klingon Battleaxe" would be seen as inappropriate as this would be deemed unprofessional as could anything that might contravene the rules of war but a conventional fighting knife that was not seen as ostentatious or ridiculous would likely be OK as long as it was not indiscrete and likely to bring the force into disrepute. Pretty much a matter of unit or formation policy really. Higher policy might be relevant if for instance it became apparent that members of a particular unit were all given to carrying items referred to as "g**k-killers" or such soubriquet which may attract adverse attention from public or press etc. Obviously this would not apply to things like bayonets, issue survival knives or Gurkha kukris.

    Pretty much the same policies apply as in most professional armies in the 1st world I think.

    I hope this makes sense as I am just out of bed after late shift and waiting for the gas engineer

    Regards

    Mark
    Last edited by Watchdog; 12-15-2015 at 11:32 AM.
    "War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. A man who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing he cares more about than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature with no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."

  6. #6

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    From personal experience, I can tell you that such practices are not allowed - but are tolerated. An explanation of what I mean is required I think! During both my tours in Northern Ireland in the 1970's, many of us carried sheath-knives for forcing locks when doing searches and the like - and probably just for the hell of it too! My mate, Clancy Campbell, used to carry a Bowie strapped to his leg. And on a few occasions, when cornered, he actually threatened to use it too. It was common knowledge amongst the officers that we carried these knives, and nothing was said.

    Both books which I wrote about my tours in Northern Ireland were vetted by the Ministry of Defence, and they took great exception to the mention of any 'non-authorised weapons.' If it wasn't army-issued kit, then I wasn't allowed to mention it in the book. For the purposes of the book, Clancy Campbell's Bowie was described as an SLR bayonet. So there you have it, although a blind eye is turned by the men doing the fighting, such practices are not allowed by M.O.D.

    Cheers,
    Steve.
    Author of... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack: Andersonstown.. Voices From 9 Battery Royal Artillery In Northern Ireland'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.

  7. #7

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    I know you arent allowed to take them on tours and even if you did mange to take it out with you ,it would be a bigger problem to get it back with you

  8. #8

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    Again, I think it is down more to unit policy, For most of my service in the 1980's I carried a small double edged fighting knife in the bayonet loop on the side of my ammo pouch in fairly clear site. Nothing was said and as it had a small hook suitable for taking the lid off bear bottles the CSM on more than one occasion when in dire need asked to borrow it.

  9. #9

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    [QUOTE=robin morley;1547694] it had a small hook suitable for taking the lid off beer bottles ]

    That would be "tool utility, multi purpose" in NATO stores-speak

    Mark
    "War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. A man who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing he cares more about than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature with no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."

  10. #10
    hog
    hog is offline
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    Many thanks Gents, it has always been a question of mine esp as the afore said knife was given the place in the British Army not so long ago.

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