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FF33 - Variants and use

Article about: Hi all! All the credits go to Funksammler (its copyrighted, got permission to use the data). Link to the Free book:https://www.dropbox.com/s/nons1x1uvw...20WW2.pdf?dl=0 VARIANTS NO STRIPE Th

  1. #1

    Default FF33 - Variants and use

    Hi all! All the credits go to Funksammler (its copyrighted, got permission to use the data).
    Link to the Free book:https://www.dropbox.com/s/nons1x1uvw...20WW2.pdf?dl=0

    VARIANTS

    NO STRIPE

    This is the first version, 1933. Note the blank plate and the scheme (way to differ them from the later ones if the blank plate is missing. The circut of the microphone.)Most existing FF 33’s were modified to the new standard as very few examples with the old microphone coil and a non green striped writing tab survive.

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    GREEN STRIPE

    Sometimes during 1939 the type of microphone used in the FF 33 handset was changed.
    The lower impedance microphone required a different microphone transformer.
    New FF 33’s can be recognised by a green stripe on the writing tab on top of the bakelite lid.
    The new microphones also have a green cross marking. Also around this time the finish of metal part was changed from a lacquered alloy to black painted steel. Also, the ALPHABET PLATE was changed.

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    YELLOW STRIPE

    The Kriegsmarine (the German Navy) had use for a special version of the FF 33 equipped with the Navy four pin headset connection.
    The Navy headsets were designed for use in high noise environments and would keep the hands free.
    In these headsets, the Navy four pin socket was placed on the outside of the bakelite housing.
    A different microphone transformer was required for use with the navy headsets, to distinguish the navy modified FF 33’s they were marked with a yellow stripe on the writing tab.

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    Also there is a Railway version.


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    My dream - pink hue DAK M35/40 and a Jon Lord spec C3

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  3. #2

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    Parts

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  4. #3

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    USE

    The minimal equipment needed to operate the field telephones are two FF 33(or compatible) phones, two wires and two 1.5 V batteries.

    • Connect the batteries the battery terminals (polarity is not critical).

    • Connect one wire between the “La” connections of both phones and the other between the “Lb/E” connections.
    The normal mode of transmission by the German Forces was a single wire with return via earth; in this case the “Lb/E” terminal would be connected to an earth pick on each side.

    • Uncoil the handset lead and place all the wires and leads on the rubber strips

    • Close the lid and place the handset crosswise on top of the telephone.
    Alternatively the phone can be hung from a nail or tree branch using the carrying strap.
    In this case the handset is hung from the hook on the carrying strap.


    When the generator handle of one phone is cranked, the bell of the other phone should ring.
    The bell of the own telephone can be tested by depressing the white test button while turning the crank (a single telephone can also be tested in this way by shorting the La and Lb/E terminals).

    When using field telephones it must be assumed that the message can be overheard by the enemy (“Feind hört mit!”), so messaging discipline is required by using appropriate codes for names and locations.
    For weak signals and noisy backgrounds the spelling alphabet printed on the top of the lid can be used to spell out messages.
    On ending the telephone call the receiver shall be replaced and the generator should be cranked with three short movements. This “calling-off” procedure is particularly important when connected via telephone switchboards.

    The FF 33 telephone has two line terminals marked “La” (“Leitung a”or line a) and “Lb/E” (“Leitung b / Erde” or line b / earth).

    The German army often used single wire connections with the other terminal connected to earth.
    The upside is that a single cable connection only uses half the wire required for a double connection, making it cheaper and easier to build; the downside is that the return current flows through the earth, making it e
    asier to intercept. For this reason telephone connections within 3 km of the front line had to be executed as double cable connections.

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  5. #4

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    The most accurate description of the Ff33 I have ever seen - nicely done. A common mistake made is battery strength. The field phone only requires 1.5 volt as mentioned. Here is some of my phone gear in use. NH

  6. #5

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    Quote by Neil Hever View Post
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    The most accurate description of the Ff33 I have ever seen - nicely done. A common mistake made is battery strength. The field phone only requires 1.5 volt as mentioned. Here is some of my phone gear in use. NH
    Thanks for pointing that out, i know its 1.5v but maybe it says in the context like one inside the phone one in reserve?
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  7. #6

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    Leonardo - what you posted is accurate. I think those encountering field phones got confused by the size of the battery compartment. Here in the US - a large 6 volt battery can fit in the compartment. You will note the compartment has a removable bakelite battery box. I assume this was there to protect the phone components from battery leakage. Some of the original 1.5 volt batteries were activated by water. If they leaked it could cause acid to damage interior components. Batteries for this purpose were larger at that time as you can see in the one photo posted. They were larger but not less efficient. Hans Winter, a Heer veteran, advised me on my research that a good 1.5 volt German battery could last up to 6 months without replacement. NH

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