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Jersey enigma machine

Article about: Just found these on file and thought you'd like to see them. D.

  1. #1

    Default Jersey enigma machine

    Just found these on file and thought you'd like to see them.

    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	258151   Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #2

    Default Re: Jersey enigma machine

    Wow!How does it work.
    I guess it must be expensive

  4. #3

    Default Re: Jersey enigma machine

    Lovely Thanks for the shots

  5. #4

    Default Re: Jersey enigma machine

    Rare and historically significant machine.........!

    You have been showing some tremendous
    items from your collection/museum !


  6. #5

    Default Re: Jersey enigma machine

    This deserves a pic rotate love it thanks for showing Sir.

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    [h=3]e plu·ri·bus u·num[/h]

  7. #6

    Default Re: Jersey enigma machine

    Quote by lianshangzheng View Post
    Wow!How does it work.I guess it must be expensive
    This machine worked like a typewriter and had a series of interchangeable wheels.
    It was a very sophisticated code machine for it's time, and the code transmissions
    were considered 'uncrackable'. There was a major breakthrough when a complete
    U-boat was captured by the British Navy in the North Sea with one of these
    machines on board. Once the code was broken, it spelled the 'begining
    of the end' of the war in the Atlantic.........


  8. #7

    Default Re: Jersey enigma machine

    Name:  10209.jpg
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Size:  11.9 KBI agree with Steve here is more detail though. The mechanical parts act in such a way as to form a varying electrical circuit. When a key is pressed, a circuit is completed with current flowing through the various components in their current configuration and ultimately lighting one of the display lamps, indicating the output letter. For example, when encrypting a message starting ANX…, the operator would first press the A key, and the Z lamp might light, so Z would be the first letter of the ciphertext. The operator would next press N, and then X in the same fashion, and so on.

    The detailed operation of Enigma is shown in the wiring diagram to the right. To simplify the example, only four components of a complete Enigma machine are shown. In reality, there are 26 lamps and keys, rotor wirings inside the rotors (of which there were either three or four) and between six and ten plug leads.

    The scrambling action of Enigma's rotors is shown for two consecutive letters with the right-hand rotor moving one position between them.Current flowed from the battery through a depressed bi-directional keyboard switch to the plugboard . Next, it passed through the (unused in this instance, so shown closed) plug via the entry wheel through the wiring of the three (Wehrmacht Enigma) or four (Kriegsmarine M4 and Abwehr variants) installed rotors , and entered the reflector . The reflector returned the current, via an entirely different path, back through the rotors and entry wheel proceeding through plug 'S' connected with a cable to plug 'D', and another bi-directional switch to light the appropriate lamp.
    The repeated changes of electrical path through an Enigma scrambler, implemented a polyalphabetic substitution cipher which provided Enigma's high security. The electrical pathway changed with each key depression, which caused rotation of at least the right hand rotor. Current passed into the set of rotors, into and back out of the reflector, and out through the rotors again. The greyed-out lines are some other possible paths within each rotor; these are hard-wired from one side of each rotor to the other. Letter A encrypts differently with consecutive key presses, first to G, and then to C. This is because the right hand rotor has stepped, sending the signal on a completely different route; eventually other rotors will also step with a key press.

    Last edited by Eric Zentner; 10-31-2011 at 07:29 AM.
    [h=3]e plu·ri·bus u·num[/h]

  9. #8

    Default Re: Jersey enigma machine

    Way cool!!! thanks for sharing

  10. #9

    Default Re: Jersey enigma machine

    Nicely explained gents, well done. The capturing of an intact enigma was indeed a crucial turning point of the Atlantic war. From then onwards, life for the Grey Wolves became very difficult. The emphasis on how important this event was is often underestimated, Churchill himself famously said that "the only thing that truly scared me were the U-Boats." The example shown above is in wonderful condition, it truly is a treasure. Thanks again to D for showing yet another special item from what must be a superb museum over there in Jersey.



  11. #10

    Default Re: Jersey enigma machine

    Very nice conditon for a very rare peice of sopshicicated machinery what else do you have hidden away im expecting a tank to pop up soon
    you really do have a brilliant collection
    thanks for sharing


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