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Vet signed bring back pennant

Article about: Hi All, I picked this little beauty up recently and counted 23 vet signatures on it, besides the names it is a nice 3 piece construction pennant about 17 inches long, where this would have c

  1. #1

    Default Vet signed bring back pennant

    Hi All,
    I picked this little beauty up recently and counted 23 vet signatures on it, besides the names it is a nice 3 piece construction pennant about 17 inches long, where this would have came from is anyones guess, I did research on the names and most had passed away with little info to go on besides they served in WW2, I did find a few guys who were decorated rather nicely, I also found info on one name saying that he served in the 95th Division under Patton, so it looks like I have another 95th division signed item to go along with my 95th division signed flag!! Here is some info on a few of the men who signed it and a photo of one of them riding in a jeep during a memorial day parade in 2012, sadly I learned he passed away a few month after. Hope you guys like it as much as I do!!
    Click image for larger version. 

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    He served in the U.S. Army as a Staff Sergeant during World War II and was a recipient of The American Theatre Campaign Ribbon, The Good Conduct Medal and European, African, and Middle Eastern Theatre Campaign Ribbon.

    After graduating from Old Fort High School in 1942, Don served in the US Army in WWII. His initial tour of duty took him to the Aleutian Islands before serving during the invasion of Europe, including the Battle of the Bulge in the 95th Division under General George Patton. He received the EAME Theater Ribbon with three bronze stars, Asiatic-Pacific Theater Ribbon with one bronze star, Victory Medal and the Good Conduct Medal.

    He entered the U.S. Army in October 1942 as a private and received a discharge in 1944 as 1st lieutenant of infantry. He was a graduate of the Infantry School at Fort Benning, Ga. and its Officer Advanced Course and served as tactical officer and instructor at the school. Following Army discharge, he worked as veteran's representative with the U.S. Employment Service and its War Manpower Commission until the end of the war.

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  3. #2

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    Was this one was on the classifieds a few days ago? If so, you beat me to it!!

  4. #3

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    Uh oh, I think I am going to have to plead the fifth on that one lol.

  5. #4

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    These are very interesting pieces of history. When I began collecting as a kid, these signed flags were looked upon as worthless due to their being defaced. Time has certainly changed the attitudes towards these pieces.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  6. #5

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    Very nice pennant Maximus! It sounds like it will go well with the rest of your collection!
    Thaddeus

  7. #6

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    Thanks guys, I believe this one will look nice in a frame, it is crazy that these were ever considered worthless just because the vets signed them, I believe in another 10 years when all the WW2 Vets have passed away that these will be worth even more!

  8. #7

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    Quote by maximus71 View Post
    Thanks guys, I believe this one will look nice in a frame, it is crazy that these were ever considered worthless just because the vets signed them, I believe in another 10 years when all the WW2 Vets have passed away that these will be worth even more!
    In the first 25 years after the war ended, most of your vets were alive. There was also a great amount of genuine material available. The concept of serious collecting was to find items that were in a condition close to what they were like when new. Items in damaged condition were left for the accumulaters who wanted everything as cheap as possible.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

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