Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Heeresbergführer-Abzeichen

Article about: Hello friends, what kind of Badge is that? I know its postwar, but i cant find any informations in the internet.

  1. #1

    Default Heeresbergführer-Abzeichen

    Hello friends,
    what kind of Badge is that? I know its postwar, but i cant find any informations in the internet.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Heeresbergführer-Abzeichen   Heeresbergführer-Abzeichen  


  2. # ADS
    Circuit advertisement Heeresbergführer-Abzeichen
    Join Date
    Always
    P
    Many
     

  3. #2

    Default

    This is a reproduction of the German Army Mountain Leader (Heeresbergführer) badge. I've attached an image of an original WW2 badge, and the current embroidered badge now worn.

    The one-year Heeresbergführer course is divided into two parts, each one six months in length. Army Mountain Guides are tasked with leading mountain units and advising their unit commanders both in military and civil situations such as mountain rescue. The Mountain Guides provide the future Gebirgsjäger with the necessary ski and mountaineering training they require which will form the central keystone to all their other training as Mountain Infantry specialists. The German Army Mountain Guide course has both winter and summer elements text from this link

    Summer & winter training (in German)
    TRAINING
    Prerequisite for the training as army mountain guide:

    A temporary or professional soldier in the rank at least Sergeant or Officer in Mountaineer Brigade 23, Special Forces Command, or Mountain Medical Unit, or other NATO forces

    After completion of the training as army mountain guide at least one remaining service in the armed forces of 2 years

    SKILLS:

    • High physical condition abilities (with 10kg backpack in military uniform at an altitude of 600 meters ≤ 1 hour)
    • Sport skiing on level DSV instructor.
    • Alpine climbing level in the UIAA difficulty area V.


    Soldiers in all subject areas of mountain-specific summer / winter training in Germany and abroad.

    The ability to move in extreme terrain, even under the most adverse conditions, to be able to survive in the hostile terrain and even to be able to fight there, represents the specialization of the mountain troops. Unchanged, the members of the armed forces are the reflection of society and accordingly recruited the mountain soldiers cross-career from all federal states. In order to enable this heterogeneous group according to its specialization for use in extreme terrain and under the most adverse weather conditions, very intensive and demanding training is necessary. With the highest military alpine training level, Army Mountain Guides train beginners, advanced skiers and junior mountain guides.


    SUMMER TRAINING


    ROCK
    1. ROCK BASICS

    Depending on the implementation responsibility, this training section will be carried out in different training locations. Under German responsibility, the FELS BASIS training takes place in the Frankenjura in Franconian Switzerland.

    2. ROCK ALPINE

    The Stripsenjochhaus in the Wilden Kaiser mountain range forms the training base for the FELS ALPIN training. [Note: The Stripsenjochhaus is an Alpine club hut owned by the Kufstein branch of the Austrian Alpine Club in the Kaisergebirge mountain range in the Austrian state of Tyrol.]

    3. ROCK EXAMINATION

    The acceptance of the exam tours as well as further practical and theoretical examinations in the Dolomite Mountains form the conclusion of this section.


    ICE - MIXED
    This section will be held in two (2) training stays.

    1. ICE BASICS

    Depending on the implementation responsibility, this training section will be carried out in different training areas. Under German responsibility the ICE training takes place at the Taschachhaus in the Pitztal. Under Austrian guidance training takes place at the Oberwalder hut in the eastern Glockner group.

    2. ICE - MIXED TEST

    Chamonix on Mont Blanc forms the training base for the exams in the subject section ICE - MIXED.


    MOUNTAIN RESCUE
    Training on scheduled mountain rescue equipment and its use in different scenarios.

    In addition to the ability of spontaneous makeshift mountain rescue with few resources, the mountain soldier also has specific material for the organized scheduled mountain rescue. This can come to fruition abroad or as part of civil-military cooperation in major events. Here, the army mountain guide is responsible locally for the leadership of the military contribution to the rescue operation.


    SPECIAL LEADERSHIP TECHNIQUES
    Designate all measures to allow the troop to overcome difficult terrain.

    The Mountain Troop unit is characterized by being able to negotiate difficult terrain where the military opponent does not suspect. In order to overcome just these heavy terrain sections, the army mountain guide is able to use mountain-specific material to set up systems that enable the further existance of the troops or the transport of material. The spectrum ranges from makeshift cable railing on zip lines, to cable cars and ropes.


    SUMMER MOUNTAIN WARFARE
    Due to the complexity of the terrain and the environment, it places special demands on people, materials and tactical principles.

    Notwithstanding the increasing mechanization, the tactical challenges have not changed significantly compared to World War I, unless one can rely on extensive means of air mobility. The environment demands everything from man and material, is an ally and an enemy at the same time. As an army mountain guide, it is important to implement the acquired alpine skills and knowledge of the alpine environment spiritually on the military mission and tactically transferred to the battlefield.


    SPECIAL LEADERSHIP TECHNIQUES
    Designate all measures to allow the troop to overcome difficult terrain.

    The Mountain Fighter Squad is characterized by being able to negotiate difficult terrain where the military opponent does not suspect. In order to overcome just these heavy terrain sections, the army mountain guide is able to use mountain-specific material to set up systems that enable the further occurrence of the troops or the transport of material. The spectrum ranges from makeshift cable railing on zip lines, cable cars and ropes


    HELECOPTER TRAINING
    Rotorcraft have both tactical and in the rescue a high priority in alpine terrain In principle, it is the first choice under favorable conditions.

    In the modern armed forces and alpine rescue services helicopters are indispensable both nationally and internationally. Often, rotorcraft are the only time-optimized means of timely getting personnel and material to the site, accident victims, and wounded soldiers in time for qualified medical care. The cooperation with helicopters always requires a high coordination effort. Even more so when the environment demands more from helicopter crews as well as from flying personnel.


    WINTER TRAINING

    SKI
    Training as DSV-Ski Instructor

    A unique feature of the German Gebirgsjägertruppe is their ski mobility. The training as a DSV-Ski Instructor forms the basis for enabling the army mountain guides to master difficult terrain even in wintry weather and to train soldiers in skiing.
    [DSV = Deutscher Skiverband; German Ski Assoication.]


    SKI TOUR
    Mobility in winter is defined for the army mountain guide as an emphasis on the ascent and the departure by ski touring.

    The military mission in the winter high mountains takes place away from infrastructure and secured ski slopes. Agility with skis forms the training focus in winter; therefore, the focus of this training is to evaluate not only the correct choice of route in ascening and descening, but also to evaluate the avalanche situation and the influence of weather. The completion of the training is an examination sojourn consisting of a high-terrain tour in Andermatt and a ski crossing in the Stubai Alps.


    ICE
    Training to overcome steep ice with ice climbing techniques.

    Frozen terrain can be found not only on glaciers or iced waterfalls. Militarily, there may also be a need to overcome other icy terrain such as steep meadow slopes or streams. The training in steep ice forms the basis for being able to transfer these techniques tactically to other terrain sections.


    AVALANCHE BLASTING

    The evaluation of avalanches during training and use in wintry high mountains is an important decision criterion.

    Despite avalanche commissions and regional avalanche warning services, many avalanche victims are mourned every year in Europe. In many ski areas, the deliberate triggering of avalanches with explosives is used to minimize the avalanche danger at secured ski slopes. In military operational areas as well, the assessment and the ability to trigger an avalanche in a controlled manner can be an important factor in the decision-making process. Avalanches can inhibit movements temporarily -- even block them completely, cut off supply lines and, in the last instance, even be used directly against the enemy as a weapon.


    MOUNTAIN RESCUE
    [Displays the summer course, but this course will emphasize winter training.]


    WINTER MOUNTIAN WARFARE

    Due to the complexity of the terrain and the environment, it places special demands on people, materials and tactical principles.

    Notwithstanding the increasing mechanization, the tactical challenges have not changed significantly compared to World War I, unless one can rely on extensive means of air mobility. The environment demands everything from man and material, is an ally and an enemy at the same time. As an army mountain guide, it is important to implement the acquired alpine skills and knowledge of the alpine environment spiritually on the military mission and tactically transferred to the battlefield.
    -- Guy
    Attached Images Attached Images Heeresbergführer-Abzeichen Heeresbergführer-Abzeichen 

  4. #3
    CBH
    CBH is offline
    ?

    Default

    Thank you for showing an original badge, I think it's the first time I've seen a good colour photo of an original.
    Could you show the back?
    And here is a photo of the modern equivalent for Austria.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Heeresbergführer-Abzeichen  

  5. #4

    Default

    Hi Chris,

    Attached is a reverse image of the HBF badge. Note the use of rivets. Also, an angled shot of the obverse: note the depth of the center of the flower? Modern repros that I've seen are relatively flat and do not have this depth. This depth is about the same as that on the Austrian Alpenverein and Deutsches Alpenverein badges.

    -- Guy
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Heeresbergführer-Abzeichen   Heeresbergführer-Abzeichen  

    Heeresbergführer-Abzeichen  
    Last edited by ghp95134; 09-19-2019 at 04:17 PM. Reason: Corrected spelling

  6. #5

    Default

    Quote by CBH View Post
    ...And here is a photo of the modern equivalent for Austria.
    Does Austria still award the medal badge? In the image below it looks like a medal badge -- but you can barely see it through the major's fingers. Larger image from here.

    I love their old-style ski caps!

    -- Guy
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Heeresbergführer-Abzeichen   Heeresbergführer-Abzeichen  


  7. #6

    Default

    Yes, the metal badge is still in use by the Austrians.

    For German-speaking members, here is a four-part TV documentary on the training of the present-day HBF of the Bundeswehr:

    YouTube
    YouTube
    YouTube
    YouTube

  8. #7
    CBH
    CBH is offline
    ?

    Default

    Thank you for the extra images, a rare badge indeed lots of photos of Fakes around.
    I image the Austrians use cloth badges on combat uniform, and metal with dress uniform.

  9. #8

    Default

    Quote by HPL2008 View Post
    Yes, the metal badge is still in use by the Austrians.

    For German-speaking members, here is a four-part TV documentary on the training of the present-day HBF of the Bundeswehr:
    Thanks for confirming the metal badge. The links you kindly provided are very informative -- I'm only on the first link and it is very good. My German was never good enough ... but I can still make out about 1/4 of what is being said.

    When I was stationed at Garmisch (Ski Patrol) way back in 1978 we had a Special Forces staff sergeant who had completed the Heeresbergführer course and proudly wore his HBF abzeichen on his sweater instead of the AFRC Ski Patrol badge (below). He said that he had to wear the German uniform because [in those days] they often crossed to Austria, France, and other borders where the US presence would be a problem. From looking at recent photos, it seems there is no problem with other foreign uniforms; I wonder if the US trainees are still required to wear the German uniform?

    Many thanks,
    -- Guy
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Heeresbergführer-Abzeichen  

  10. #9

    Default

    Sorry, I don't know.

    By the way, speaking of crossing borders: The documentary portrays the 2014/2015 training course. This was the last one undertaken by the Bundeswehr alone. Since 2015, the German and Austrian armed forces have made the training of their Heeresbergführer a joint enterprise, with responsibility alternating between the two countries for every course: The 2015/16 course was held by the German Ausbildungsstützpunkt Gebirgs- und Winterkampf [Training Base Mountain- and Winter Warfare] in Mittenwald, the 2016/17 course by the Austrian Gebirgskampfzentrum [Mountain Combat Center] in Saalfelden.

    A newspaper article about the graduates of that last "national" course:

    Bundeswehr Mittenwald: Die letzten Heeresbergfuhrer ihrer Art | Mittenwald

    2015 also saw the creation of a new joint German/Austrian qualification badge, the Abzeichen für Hochgebirgsspezialisten [Badge for High Alpine Specialists], which is one qualification level below the Heeresbergführer.

  11. #10

    Default

    Quote by HPL2008 View Post
    ...2015 also saw the creation of a new joint German/Austrian qualification badge, the Abzeichen für Hochgebirgsspezialisten [Badge for High Alpine Specialists], which is one qualification level below the Heeresbergführer.
    Thanks! I didn't know about that badge .... another "want" for my collection!

    EDIT: Although the article states these men are the last of their type ... and a new joint HBS badge is made at one qualification below HBF, (1) I assume there will still be a German HBF; (2) there is somewhere a list of qualifications for the new HBS badge? All I could find on the Austrian Bundesheer site is the training lasted five weeks in the winter and summer: "...Je fünf Wochen im Winter und im Sommer dauerte die Ausbildung. ..."

    Thanks,
    -- Guy
    Attached Images Attached Images Heeresbergführer-Abzeichen 

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Heeresbergführer-Abzeichen - Real or Fake? - Help Needed!

    In Heer, Luftwaffe, & Kriegsmarine Uniforms of the Third Reich
    05-27-2019, 11:07 PM
  2. 05-29-2016, 03:50 AM
  3. 01-30-2015, 09:10 PM
  4. 07-24-2014, 02:10 PM
  5. 11-20-2013, 08:20 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •