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Eickhorn army dagger with glass grip

Article about: Hi guys! Here's one of my latest additions to my collection. It's a nice army dagger by Eickhorn with a beautiful glass grip. It has the 1935-1941 etched trademark. The tang is tapered and t

  1. #11

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    This is very nice Danny..these glass gripped daggers always amazed me..on a few points.

    #1 the thoughts of the producer....on why they made this type of grip.
    #2 The dexterity..of the grip..and how long it will last
    #3 the thoughts of the owner..why he chose a glass grip....maybe vanity?

    I have to worry about protecting my glass screen..on my cell phone with a whole protective cover..so it doesnt crack or chip the screen when I accidentally drop it. This is..Im very sure..as humans are all the same..in all time periods..of either being clumsy..or accidentally bumping it.

    A glass gripped Heer dagger is one of many key pieces to have in this type of collection. Ivory grips,, slants etc. Regards Larry
    It is not the size of a Collection in History that matters......Its the size of your Passion for it!! - Larry C

    One never knows what tree roots push to the surface of what laid buried before the tree was planted - Larry C

    “The farther back you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see.” - Winston Churchill

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  3. #12
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    Danny,


    Love the glass grip

    Sweet Eickhorn heer dagger !!!


    Congrats !




    Mac 66

  4. #13
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    Hello,
    What a great dagger and a great grip.

    Jody

  5. #14

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    Your 1st glass grip? I'm thinking that you just voluntarily gave yourself a new addiction! That one Is a beauty by any standards you want to look at! (And, yes-I always thought the glass grips were amazing!)
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  6. #15
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    I have a question for you all.........

    The grip colour debate has been going on as long as I can remember and I have to say that I am a firm believer that the standard trolon grips change colour over time. With this in mind, how do you go about manufacturing a glass or silica grip in a colour that not only would have stood out like a sore thumb at the time, but also matches tonally perfect 60+years later..........

    They are an enigma to me and a very debatable argument for the pro-non-colour changer theorists out there .

  7. #16

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    Quote by Degens View Post
    I have a question for you all.........

    The grip colour debate has been going on as long as I can remember and I have to say that I am a firm believer that the standard trolon grips change colour over time. With this in mind, how do you go about manufacturing a glass or silica grip in a colour that not only would have stood out like a sore thumb at the time, but also matches tonally perfect 60+years later..........

    They are an enigma to me and a very debatable argument for the pro-non-colour changer theorists out there .
    I can see where our thinking has crossed the same pathways, years ago asking the same question. Also being a believer that the cast phenolic resin grips do in fact change color, with technical documentation to support that fact. With the simplest answer perhaps being that no glass or silica is involved. And that the resins (which were available from different makers besides Dynamit Nobel GmbH - Troisdorf) where this is seen were more translucent giving the appearance of glass - but instead are from batches of plastic that has aged in this fashion. And before I forget - this is a really nice Army dagger. Best Regards, Fred

  8. #17
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    So a basically translucent form of phenolic resin or plastic that has also reacted with light?.
    why didn't I think of that. What was the factory colour then in your opinion Fred?, orange or just a basic translucent plastic?, or have I grabbed the wrong end of the stick . The metallic flakes added to the mix to give them that sparkly effect that you see on many of these, surely suggests that the grips where intentionally orange from the outset.

    Based on sheer appearance and the chipping / damage that occurs to these grips, I was always under the impression that glass or silica was the main ingredient. I have learnt something today!.

  9. #18

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    In the Us, this type of plastic was known as "Catalin" and many radios and costume jewelry were made of this material. To begin with, when new, the color was usually a white or white-ish color, but when exposed to Sunlight , it can change into some amazing different colors over time. The bright pumpkin orange is usually the end result, but it can also be any number of shades of the same, depending on how much sunlight it has seen and for how long. This color change was totally unintended and uncontrolled. Aside from being more expensive than normal plastics, it was also discovered to be quite Brittle and would crack naturally ,even without injury to cause it, and so it was eventually discontinued for general use in the US. By the mid-to late 40's it had pretty much vanished from the marketplace.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  10. #19

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    All of the verifiable period evidence to date indicates white was the original color. With different batches (all mixed individually) reacting to ultraviolet light - one of the old tests was to see how long a particular formulation might keep its color - literally hundreds were tested with only a small percentage passing. With the black supposedly "funeral" daggers just white painted Bakelite grips that have had the paint stripped off. And, as William noted, "Catalin" a brand name outside of Germany it was made in various colors that tended to also change color with time. All of which applies to the cast resins which were relatively low temperature creations made using lead molds (with the liquid resins poured into them) that after curing were broken into pieces to remove the plastic. But the differently formulated molded Bakelite plastics were another completely separate matter - found to be quite suitable for extended use with pistol and rifle parts, bayonet grips, etc. Best Regards to both, Fred

  11. #20

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    Excellent quality dagger. The grip only adds to it's
    beauty and desireability, IMO. - Congrats.........!
    Regards,


    Steve.

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