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Eickhorn heer dagger for review

Article about: I have started a separate thread on the aluminum dagger to avoid hijacking this thread. Of course the textbook daggers are the backbone of every collection, and I do make sure I have at leas

  1. #11
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    Like Larry said if you prefer textbook daggers then this mid period dagger is not for you.
    Like Danny stated its very uncommon to find a gen.guard during this period on an Eick.
    Its a bit like William says: some dealers can sell a white box as a dark grey or even black one, depending how hard they want to sell it, BUT selling the same dagger to him for sure its now a partdagger and of a lower price range.
    So dont believe all they state...after all they are in for the money

    If we state that every thing is possible then the forum quickly will not have any viewers left.
    In this case my 2 cents are: replaced cross guard, not an all original Eickhorn dagger.

    Ger

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  3. #12

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    I can´t agree with you, many things are impossible when we are talk about army daggers... But it is possible that Eickhorn ran out of its own crossguards and purchase some generic , several similar daggers with same configuration exist, so I still think it is possible and I believe in this theory. Bigger producers such W.K.C., E. Pack, Alcoso also occasionally use generic "A" and generic "B" crossguards on its army daggers, so why can not Eickhorn?

    Regards Peter

  4. #13

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    I have no problem with generic "A" crossguards on Eickhorn daggers. Here is an example obtained directly from the original owner.

    Wolfgang

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  5. #14
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    Wolfgang, When I look at the scabbard of the dagger you show, I also notice that the scabbard is not a typical Eickhorn scabbard. Just an observation. Btw I love your photography!

    Danny

  6. #15

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    You are of course correct Danny. However, since this was a gift from the original owner, I can accept the piece as it is. All manufacturers, including Eickhorn did some things we can not explain. Here is a photo of another unusual Eickhorn. It is all aluminum, with an integral throat. I have two of these, identical from different sources. One is much more worn than the other. You would never guess this to be an Eickhorn. These are not textbook pieces and will be questioned, but they are interesting for study.

    Wolfgang

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    Here is another strange early Eickhorn with early "Generic" guard. Arguments could be made that it is a parts piece. I have not had the time to make a good photo of this piece.

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  7. #16
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    Very interesting indeed Wolfgang! Are you saying the entire scabbard is made of aluminum or are you only referring to the crossguard and pommel?

    Danny

  8. #17

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    The entire scabbard, including the bands are made made from aluminum. The very heavy silver plating did not adhere very well, hence the bubbles in the finish. Guard and pommel are in aluminum as well.
    Wolfgang

  9. #18
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    Thx for your contribution Wolfgang!

    unfortunate lots of collectors cant buy/ or get daggers directly from the former owners family like you did with this one.
    I have to agree with Peter that a lot is possible with Heer daggers.
    but i also said that my reply is: my 2 cents
    I prefer a textbook dagger instead of a great sales story of a Militaria Seller, but he thats just me

    I think those Alumium Eickhorn's are very interesting!
    Thx for showing them here.

    Ger

  10. #19

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    Hi friends, I also notice, like Danny, that the scabbard on Wolfgang´s dagger with Generic "A" crossguard is not Eickhorns, so in my opinion don´t belong to this piece, but if it is from original owner, I accept it too Daggers which Wolfgang shows are very interesting - both! Especially early Eickhorn with 1. type of crossguard - really all the fittings are made from aluminum? I already has two Eickhorn 1. type dagger, but crossguards and pommels are too heavy, so your dagger is really anomaly to me. Can you tell me which type of Eickhorn mark is on blade - early double oval ?

    I forgot something, here is R E P R O D U C T I O N of Eickhorn dagger with Generic parts, probably made in Spain - it is interesting to note, that Spanish decide to make reproductions of Eickhorn daggers with generic "A" crossguards. Photos are from my copy archive.

    Regards Peter
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  11. #20
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    I agree with Ger. I prefer the textbook pieces too. I love to see the specific details in a dagger that are typical for a certain maker. The way the daggers are constructed (you can take them apart very easily) makes it very simple to replace parts. If all parts are from the same manufacturer you can be fairly sure that that didn't happen to your dagger. Another aspect is that I always take into account that there might come a time that I have to sell some daggers. If that time comes, I know it will be alot easier to sell a textbook piece than to sell a story

    Danny

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