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"Feuerwehr"?

Article about: Years ago, I knew a man who had served in Breslau during the closing days of the war when the city had been surrounded by the Soviets. He later spent a number of years in a Russian POW camp

  1. #1

    Default "Feuerwehr"?

    Years ago, I knew a man who had served in Breslau during the closing days of the war when the city had been surrounded by the Soviets. He later spent a number of years in a Russian POW camp and ended up in the US having immigrated as a DP sponsored by a Catholic charity.
    Needless to say he had some hair-raising stories of his time in Breslau as a 17 yr old machine gunner. He mentioned being part of a "Feuerwehr" unit that rushed to plug holes in the line. Is there any way of finding out what unit he might have belonged to? (He has passed away) I know the Grossdeutschland used the "Feuerwehr" name but did other units use it as well? Perhaps SS?

  2. #2

    Default Re: "Feuerwehr"?

    I'm not 100% sure but i think that the Feuerwehr soldiers were just that.....fire fighters sent to plug a gap (not literally fire-fighters)

    It roughly equates to the British Army's QRF (Quick reaction Force) The boys that go and "look see"........Every unit in the front line would have them

  3. #3

    Default Re: "Feuerwehr"?

    I think the SS used a different term but i'm far from sure on it. Stewy S

  4. #4

    Default Re: "Feuerwehr"?

    Hi Guys,

    Panzer regiment 'Grossdeutschland' were colloqually known as "The fire brigade" by other regiments in a jokey kind of way, because of the daring, even suicidal looking actions they were often called upon to perform by the General Staff during the Ostfront retreat.

    Another regiment dubbed the same later in the war was SS Panzer Regiment 'Hohenstaufen' for similar actions performed during the retreat from Budapest back towards Berlin.

    In the early 19th century, the British army often used bands of volunteers for particularly dangerous or likely fatal missions such as storming city/fort walls on ladders or breaches therein. There was, surprisingly, no shortage of officers and soldier volunteers for these hazardous operations because the oppurtunity of rich plunder and rapid promotion(if they survived) would never arise for many years of 'normal' service.These men were known throughout the army as 'The Folorn Hope'.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  5. #5

    Default Re: "Feuerwehr"?

    Ned
    Very interesting, and great information, I didn't know that was were the folorn hope originated from
    Thanks

  6. #6

    Default Re: "Feuerwehr"?

    Forlorn Hope goes back to at least Napoleonic times. Probably further. Stewy S

  7. #7
    ?

    Default Re: "Feuerwehr"?

    Watch Sharpe and you'll learn all about the Forlorn Hope
    The gates of hell were opened and we accepted the invitation to enter" 26/880 Lance Sgt, Edward Dyke. 26th Bn Northumberland Fusiliers , ( 3rd Tyneside Irish )

    1st July 1916

    Thought shall be the harder , heart the keener,
    Courage the greater as our strength faileth.
    Here lies our leader ,in the dust of his greatness.
    Who leaves him now , be damned forever.
    We who are old now shall not leave this Battle,
    But lie at his feet , in the dust with our leader

    House Carles at the Battle of Hastings

  8. #8

    Default Re: "Feuerwehr"?

    Quote by Paul E View Post
    Watch Sharpe and you'll learn all about the Forlorn Hope
    Listen to Ned and you'll learn more!!

    I'm surprised my post has been so interesting to some of you fella's.

    Last bit, for now. The French at the same time during the early 19th century, had an almost identical system as the 'Forlorn Hope' and used in the same way along almost the same lines. Volunteer rankers led by at least one junior officer were guaranteed promotion to officers should they be lucky enough to survive the extremely hazardous/suicidal orders given to them. These men were greatly respected in Boney's army, and were known as "Les Enfants Perdue"....The Lost Children...And you won't see that on 'Sharpe'!

    Vive la entente cordial!! Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

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