Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22

How the Nazis Stole Christmas

Article about: An interesting article in the Independant today. I would love to visit the museum in Cologne and see this private collection of Nazi Christmas Memorabillia How the Nazis stole Christmas - Eu

  1. #11

    Default Re: How the Nazis Stole Christmas

    im sure no-one would notice the cartpet unless there were a few iron crosses and maybe a mp40 as the angel

    tom

  2. #12

    Default Re: How the Nazis Stole Christmas

    Here's a couple of...er... 'festive' items corrently for sale at Beck Militaria.

    An SS Julleuchter for 475 Euro's and a boxed set of six glass Swastika baubles for the tree for 355.

    Regards, Ned.


    Name:  indexCA35ZKDS.jpg
Views: 234
Size:  9.8 KBClick image for larger version. 

Name:	indexCACE6Z67.jpg 
Views:	71 
Size:	51.0 KB 
ID:	234231Click image for larger version. 

Name:	indexCAZFGGZB.jpg 
Views:	84 
Size:	67.8 KB 
ID:	234232Click image for larger version. 

Name:	indexCAQUZCX8.jpg 
Views:	128 
Size:	65.0 KB 
ID:	234233
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  3. #13

    Default Re: How the Nazis Stole Christmas

    i wonder if anywon collects these and has there own nazi christmas theme duering winter?

  4. #14

    Default Re: How the Nazis Stole Christmas

    Quote by HistoryIsMe View Post
    i wonder if anywon collects these and has there own nazi christmas theme duering winter?
    I know a guy who has one bauble (no, not Hitler...) and he put's it on his tree every year. Not my cup of tea though.

    Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  5. #15

    Default Re: How the Nazis Stole Christmas

    Well as Christmas was grafted on to the old pagan festval of the "Winter Solstice" or even the old Roman pagan fesival of Saturnalia, you could argue that it was the Christians' who stole Christmas and that the Nazis (also pagan) were just stealing it back !

  6. #16

    Default Re: How the Nazis Stole Christmas

    Quote by Stickgrenade View Post
    An interesting article in the Independant today.

    I would love to visit the museum in Cologne and see this private collection of Nazi Christmas Memorabillia

    How the Nazis stole Christmas - Europe, World - The Independent
    This article is wrong on multiple levels. Most all of the symbols associated with Christmas Pre-date the birth of Christ and are in fact Pre Christian Pagan symbols that were incorporated into Christianity when it took a hold under Constantine some around 350. It was the Christians that stole the symbols of Pagan ritual. Not the other way around.

    It is also untrue that the Nazi's stole Christmas, even under the SS with its Pagan ritual it is clear that there was a co-existence with the church to some degree. The N.S.D.A.P did rough up the church like they did with everything else under National Socialist rule but Hitler understood that Christianity was not going anywhere.

    Most all of the symbols and most all of the rituals of Christmas are in fact Pagan and Germanic or Nordic. These guys who write this stuff really crack me up. The Christians incorporated everything over into Christmas, Himmler sought to take it back. That is the history. And the post above me that I missed is totally accurate.

    Everyone wants to bash the history and revise it, the article is wrong.

    Kris

  7. #17

    Default Re: How the Nazis Stole Christmas

    Few people realize that the origins of a form of Christmas was pagan & celebrated in Europe long before anyone there had heard of Jesus Christ.

    No one knows what day Jesus Christ was born on. From the biblical description, most historians believe that his birth probably occurred in September, approximately six months after Passover. One thing they agree on is that it is very unlikely that Jesus was born in December, since the bible records shepherds tending their sheep in the fields on that night. This is quite unlikely to have happened during a cold Judean winter. So why do we celebrate Christ's birthday as Christmas, on December the 25th?

    The answer lies in the pagan origins of Christmas. In ancient Babylon, the feast of the Son of Isis (Goddess of Nature) was celebrated on December 25. Raucous partying, gluttonous eating and drinking, and gift-giving were traditions of this feast.

    In Rome, the Winter Solstice was celebrated many years before the birth of Christ. The Romans called their winter holiday Saturnalia, honoring Saturn, the God of Agriculture. In January, they observed the Kalends of January, which represented the triumph of life over death. This whole season was called Dies Natalis Invicti Solis, the Birthday of the Unconquered Sun. The festival season was marked by much merrymaking. It is in ancient Rome that the tradition of the Mummers was born. The Mummers were groups of costumed singers and dancers who traveled from house to house entertaining their neighbors. From this, the Christmas tradition of caroling was born.

    In northern Europe, many other traditions that we now consider part of Christian worship were begun long before the participants had ever heard of Christ. The pagans of northern Europe celebrated the their own winter solstice, known as Yule. Yule was symbolic of the pagan Sun God, Mithras, being born, and was observed on the shortest day of the year. As the Sun God grew and matured, the days became longer and warmer. It was customary to light a candle to encourage Mithras, and the sun, to reappear next year.

    Huge Yule logs were burned in honor of the sun. The word Yule itself means "wheel," the wheel being a pagan symbol for the sun. Mistletoe was considered a sacred plant, and the custom of kissing under the mistletoe began as a fertility ritual. Hollyberries were thought to be a food of the gods.

    The tree is the one symbol that unites almost all the northern European winter solstices. Live evergreen trees were often brought into homes during the harsh winters as a reminder to inhabitants that soon their crops would grow again. Evergreen boughs were sometimes carried as totems of good luck and were often present at weddings, representing fertility. The Druids used the tree as a religious symbol, holding their sacred ceremonies while surrounding and worshipping huge trees.

    In 350, Pope Julius I declared that Christ's birth would be celebrated on December 25. There is little doubt that he was trying to make it as painless as possible for pagan Romans (who remained a majority at that time) to convert to Christianity. The new religion went down a bit easier, knowing that their feasts would not be taken away from them.

    Christmas (Christ-Mass) as we know it today, most historians agree, began in Germany, though Catholics and Lutherans still disagree about which church celebrated it first. The earliest record of an evergreen being decorated in a Christian celebration was in 1521 in the Alsace region of Germany. A prominent Lutheran minister of the day cried blasphemy: "Better that they should look to the true tree of life, Christ."

    Christmas' Pagan Origins

  8. #18

    Default Re: How the Nazis Stole Christmas

    III. The Origins of Christmas Customs

    A. The Origin of Christmas Tree
    Just as early Christians recruited Roman pagans by associating Christmas with the Saturnalia, so too worshippers of the Asheira cult and its offshoots were recruited by the Church sanctioning “Christmas Trees”.[7] Pagans had long worshipped trees in the forest, or brought them into their homes and decorated them, and this observance was adopted and painted with a Christian veneer by the Church.

    B. The Origin of Mistletoe
    Norse mythology recounts how the god Balder was killed using a mistletoe arrow by his rival god Hoder while fighting for the female Nanna. Druid rituals use mistletoe to poison their human sacrificial victim.[8] The Christian custom of “kissing under the mistletoe” is a later synthesis of the sexual license of Saturnalia with the Druidic sacrificial cult.[9]

    C. The Origin of Christmas Presents
    In pre-Christian Rome, the emperors compelled their most despised citizens to bring offerings and gifts during the Saturnalia (in December) and Kalends (in January). Later, this ritual expanded to include gift-giving among the general populace. The Catholic Church gave this custom a Christian flavor by re-rooting it in the supposed gift-giving of Saint Nicholas (see below).[10]

    D. The Origin of Santa Claus

    a. Nicholas was born in Parara, Turkey in 270 CE and later became Bishop of Myra. He died in 345 CE on December 6th. He was only named a saint in the 19th century.

    b. Nicholas was among the most senior bishops who convened the Council of Nicaea in 325 CE and created the New Testament. The text they produced portrayed Jews as “the children of the devil”[11] who sentenced Jesus to death.

    c. In 1087, a group of sailors who idolized Nicholas moved his bones from Turkey to a sanctuary in Bari, Italy. There Nicholas supplanted a female boon-giving deity called The Grandmother, or Pasqua Epiphania, who used to fill the children's stockings with her gifts. The Grandmother was ousted from her shrine at Bari, which became the center of the Nicholas cult. Members of this group gave each other gifts during a pageant they conducted annually on the anniversary of Nicholas’ death, December 6.

    d. The Nicholas cult spread north until it was adopted by German and Celtic pagans. These groups worshipped a pantheon led by Woden –their chief god and the father of Thor, Balder, and Tiw. Woden had a long, white beard and rode a horse through the heavens one evening each Autumn. When Nicholas merged with Woden, he shed his Mediterranean appearance, grew a beard, mounted a flying horse, rescheduled his flight for December, and donned heavy winter clothing.

    e. In a bid for pagan adherents in Northern Europe, the Catholic Church adopted the Nicholas cult and taught that he did (and they should) distribute gifts on December 25th instead of December 6th.

    f. In 1809, the novelist Washington Irving (most famous his The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle) wrote a satire of Dutch culture entitled Knickerbocker History. The satire refers several times to the white bearded, flying-horse riding Saint Nicholas using his Dutch name, Santa Claus.

    g. Dr. Clement Moore, a professor at Union Seminary, read Knickerbocker History, and in 1822 he published a poem based on the character Santa Claus: “Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse. The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, in the hope that Saint Nicholas soon would be there…” Moore innovated by portraying a Santa with eight reindeer who descended through chimneys.

    h. The Bavarian illustrator Thomas Nast almost completed the modern picture of Santa Claus. From 1862 through 1886, based on Moore’s poem, Nast drew more than 2,200 cartoon images of Santa for Harper’s Weekly. Before Nast, Saint Nicholas had been pictured as everything from a stern looking bishop to a gnome-like figure in a frock. Nast also gave Santa a home at the North Pole, his workshop filled with elves, and his list of the good and bad children of the world. All Santa was missing was his red outfit.

    i. In 1931, the Coca Cola Corporation contracted the Swedish commercial artist Haddon Sundblom to create a coke-drinking Santa. Sundblom modeled his Santa on his friend Lou Prentice, chosen for his cheerful, chubby face. The corporation insisted that Santa’s fur-trimmed suit be bright, Coca Cola red. And Santa was born – a blend of Christian crusader, pagan god, and commercial idol.

  9. #19

    Default Re: How the Nazis Stole Christmas

    Hi Kris, very interesting and informative posts. Few who sit down to their Christmas dinner will have ever heard of all of this....

    Cheers, Ade.

  10. #20

    Default Re: How the Nazis Stole Christmas

    Fascinating reading Kris

    Nick
    "In all my years as a soldier, I have never seen men fight so hard." - SS Obergruppenfuhrer Wilhelm Bittrich - Arnhem

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Merry Christmas!

    In Cloth Headgear
    12-25-2011, 01:53 AM
  2. Merry Christmas

    In Search technology and metal detecting
    12-19-2009, 12:07 PM
  3. Merry Christmas

    In Bayonets and trench knives of the world
    12-16-2009, 09:17 PM
  4. 12-26-2008, 09:06 PM
  5. Merry christmas

    In Discussions
    12-25-2008, 11:32 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •