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Soviet labour camp patch

Article about: I had not realised that Soviet prisoners in the Soviet labour camps were assigned number patches such as this example from the Memorial Society archive in Russia: Above: Labour camp personal

  1. #1

    Default Soviet labour camp patch

    I had not realised that Soviet prisoners in the Soviet labour camps were assigned number patches such as this example from the Memorial Society archive in Russia:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Above: Labour camp personal number, Inta, Komi Republic, 1944

    Also from the archive a
    cover (below) of a handwritten book of memoirs by a Russian inmate of Mauthausen camp. Something new also, I did not know there was ever a red political winkel with "R" for Russian inmates or is this artistic license?


    Click image for larger version. 

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    I collect, therefore I am.

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  3. #2
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    1st one that I have seen. Thanks for showing.

  4. #3

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    You just don't see gulag materials for sale but I there must be a collectors market and dealers?
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  5. #4

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    Quote by StefanM View Post
    I had not realised that Soviet prisoners in the Soviet labour camps were assigned number patches such as this example from the Memorial Society archive in Russia:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screen Shot 2014-01-07 at 15.06.44.png 
Views:	134 
Size:	308.2 KB 
ID:	625634

    Above: Labour camp personal number, Inta, Komi Republic, 1944

    Also from the archive a
    cover (below) of a handwritten book of memoirs by a Russian inmate of Mauthausen camp. Something new also, I did not know there was ever a red political winkel with "R" for Russian inmates or is this artistic license?


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screen Shot 2014-01-08 at 14.10.51.jpg 
Views:	124 
Size:	72.3 KB 
ID:	625640
    There may have been an "R" patch, as you can see there was a "P" for Poles And "T" for Czechs!..

    Click image for larger version. 

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  6. #5

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    The usual German mark for Soviet prisoners was "SU" rather than "R" but I am no expert on this subject.
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  7. #6
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    Actually, yes. There was an "R" marked winkel for such prisoners. This image was taken of a group of female inmates of KZ-Aussenlager Holleischen - a former sub-camp of KZ-Flossenbürg, shortly after liberation and reproduced to augment my recent article published in the After The Battle magazine addressing the camp. The woman to the right on the back row, clearly wears such a patch.

    The various insignia of Konzentrationslagers inmates is addressed briefly in this thread:

    Konzentrationslagers Prisoner Identification Insignia
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

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    Experienced guide and published author leading detailed study trips to the former KZ sites of Nazi Germany. Contact for further details.

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  8. #7

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    Quote by Gunny Hartmann View Post
    There may have been an "R" patch, as you can see there was a "P" for Poles And "T" for Czechs!..
    Quite right; but either these two are only meant as examples or this period chart is from the time after the Polish campaign but before the further conquests/annexations.

    There were various others. Carl is surely more knowledgable on this matter, but I am aware of the following nationality markings:

    • B [Belgier / Belgien] for Belgian prisoners
    • F [Franzose / Frankreich] for French prisoners
    • I [Italiener / Italien] for Italian prisoners
    • J [Jugoslawe / Jugoslawien] for Yugoslav prisoners
    • N [Niederländer / Niederlande] for Dutch prisoners
    • P [Pole / Polen] for Polish prisoners
    • R [Russe / Russland] for Russian prisoners
    • S [Spanier / Spanien] for Spanish prisoners
    • SU [Sowjetunion] for Soviet prisoners (possibly only for Soviet POWs?)
    • T [Tscheche / Tschechei] for Czech prisoners
    • U [Ungar / Ungarn] for Hungarian prisoners



    Sources:
    Wollheim Memorial
    http://www.jku.at/kanonistik/content...n_5_6_7_8_.pdf
    Kennzeichnung der Häftlinge in den Konzentrationslagern
    Nazi concentration camp badges - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  9. #8

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    Quote by CARL88 View Post
    Actually, yes. There was an "R" marked winkel for such prisoners. This image was taken of a group of female inmates of KZ-Aussenlager Holleischen - a former sub-camp of KZ-Flossenbürg, shortly after liberation and reproduced to augment my recent article published in the After The Battle magazine addressing the camp. The woman to the right on the back row, clearly wears such a patch.

    The various insignia of Konzentrationslagers inmates is addressed briefly in this thread:

    Konzentrationslagers Prisoner Identification Insignia
    Thanks for this interesting photo reference, Carl. Do you know specifically when this photo was taken and who is credited with taking it?
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  10. #9
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    Quote by StefanM View Post
    Thanks for this interesting photo reference, Carl. Do you know specifically when this photo was taken and who is credited with taking it?
    Not exactly Stefan. I received permission to reproduce the image from a Czech historian. From the information I gathered from him, the image was taken shortly after the liberation of the camp - so it is possible that it was taken by members of the Polish Brygada Świętokrzyska (The Holy Cross Mountain's Brigade) - who were the initial liberators, although perhaps it is more likely that the image was taken slightly later by the Allied forces who arrived soon after. There are more images of female prisoners from Holleischen, that were taken shortly after the camp was liberated. Most are scenes within the former Appellplatz (roll call area) or adjacent to the former accommodation buildings. These seem somewhat less staged than the image shown above. Some of the women did stay in the area for a while following their liberation, to recover and go through the repatriation process so it is conceivable that it was during this period that the image was taken.
    Experienced guide and published author leading detailed study trips to the former KZ sites of Nazi Germany. Contact for further details.

    www.concentrationcamptours.com

    www.concentrationcampmoney.com


    "maka akaŋl oyate maŋi pi ki le, tuweŋi wíyópeya oki hi sni"

  11. #10

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    Quote by CARL88 View Post
    Not exactly Stefan. I received permission to reproduce the image from a Czech historian. From the information I gathered from him, the image was taken shortly after the liberation of the camp - so it is possible that it was taken by members of the Polish Brygada Świętokrzyska (The Holy Cross Mountain's Brigade) - who were the initial liberators, although perhaps it is more likely that the image was taken slightly later by the Allied forces who arrived soon after. There are more images of female prisoners from Holleischen, that were taken shortly after the camp was liberated. Most are scenes within the former Appellplatz (roll call area) or adjacent to the former accommodation buildings. These seem somewhat less staged than the image shown above. Some of the women did stay in the area for a while following their liberation, to recover and go through the repatriation process so it is conceivable that it was during this period that the image was taken.
    Thanks Carl,

    Given that there is a "Russian" in the photo this is very unlikely to have been taken by anyone in Brygada Świętokrzyska

    Do you know if the "R" for "Russian" included Ukrainian and Byelorussian inmates in the camp system?

    I would think the photo was taken sometime after liberation compared to the others from camp I have seen online which are as you say less staged. The other women in the photo seem to have plain winkels without any nationality letter unless the film has not recorded the letters as is sometimes apparent in photos of forced labour patches I have.

    Does anyone know what numbering/identification system the Soviets used for various gulag inmates such as displayed in the OP photo? Would this number patch have been worn on the jacket only or were trousers also marked with such numbers?
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

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