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Currency used

Article about: Hey guys..not sure if this is the right place for it but what currency would US troops have used to buy local products once they had crossed the rhine? Would they have used reichsmarks or US

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    Default Currency used

    Hey guys..not sure if this is the right place for it but what currency would US troops have used to buy local products once they had crossed the rhine? Would they have used reichsmarks or US dollars? and same sort of question but in the Philippines..would US troops fighting through the Philippines use pesos or US dollars? Thanks Sean

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    MAP
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    Maybe helpful, maybe not but check out this link about Occupation currency in Germany. Starting on page 336

    Chapter XVIII: The Occupation Troops

    But no matter, I'm sure US dollars, or Sterling was happily accepted as a form of payment. Could be wrong.

    Michael
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

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    That's a very interesting article..particularly the part about fraternisation..i was just wondering about the initial crossings and what was used money wise,i can see what you mean about US dollars as some is better than none..just curious if there was an official currency

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    Food and supplies would have been used as currency. I wouldnt think the old Reichsmark (swastika included) would have been used by the incoming troops..https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allied_Military_Currency PS i have the 5 mark

  5. #5
    MAP
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    Don't know. But found another link selling coins minted by the US for the Philippines once they boot Japan out

    World War II Coins and Currency

    "This attractive Brilliant Uncirculated bronze 1 Centavo was produced at the San Francisco mint in 1944 inpreparation for the liberation of the Philippines from Japan. One side of the coin shows an Eagle atop the Philippine arms and the legend "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA", along with the famed "S" mintmark of the San Francisco Mint. The other side shows a seated man with a hammer and anvil in front of a volcano. In 1946 the Philippines gained independence, making it one of the last coins the United States made for its onetime colony of the Philippines. "
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  6. #6

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    Allied soldiers had "Liberation Money" for each country that they entered. They would take their military issued scrip notes and purchase Liberation Money with them for whatever country they happened to be in at the time.

    A superb book on the subject was written by Boling and Schwan titled "WWII Remembered: History in Your Hands-a Numismatic Study"

    And, yes-in the Philippines, when US troops landed with MacArthur on Leyte Island in 1943, they carried special "Victory Notes" with them to spend. They were in circulation, I believe, until 1949 when the new government finally issued new currency(they overstamped the Victory notes with their own stamp). They were still being honored as late as 1967. Previous to the Victory notes, the US soldiers had special notes for their use. They were printed in January of 1943 in 1,5 and 10 Peso notes. They also had special notes printed up dated 1936 of 5,10, 20 and 100 Pesos.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

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    Thanks guys...by scrip notes do you mean some kind of pay receipt?

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    Scrip notes = Allied Military Pay notes. Soldiers did not carry normal currency, as it was not allowed in case of capture and use by the enemy, etc, so they were issued special currency notes that could be either spent in military channels or exchanged for local currency.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

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