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Victory Bell

Article about: Not sure where this fits ,.. didnt see a category in the Allied section here for this sort of thing? ... one of those items I guess there is know way of really knowing if it is smelted from

  1. #1
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    Default Victory Bell

    Not sure where this fits ,.. didnt see a category in the Allied section here for this sort of thing? ... one of those items I guess there is know way of really knowing if it is smelted from Genuine downed German Aircraft as claimed? ... has Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill's faces placed around the body, and Victory V on handle

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Victory Bell

    I doubt, that its from airplane aluminum.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Victory Bell

    Quote by Scout View Post
    I doubt, that its from airplane aluminum.
    Actually they were. They were cast by the Buckinghamshire Die Casting Co. Ltd of Burnham, from the remains of shot down German aircraft in the U.K. The design was from an American bell founder Conrad Parlanti of Berkeley, San Francisco, there were 3 slightly different designs that I know of, but may be more. The content was not solely aluminium, other metals contaminated some of the batches produced, which were sold in aid of the Royal Airforce Benevolent Fund directly after VE day in 1945. Indeed, the first ones auctioned were at the first Battle of Britain Dinner attended by survivors, and were auctioned off for as much as 1200, at the time a huge sum, by Chesney Allen of 'Flanagan & Allen' fame.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Victory Bell

    If that is so, might there not have been (a very good deal of) other metals put in deliberately (instead of 'contaminating' the batches of alu).

  5. #5

    Default Re: Victory Bell

    Quote by Scout View Post
    If that is so, might there not have been (a very good deal of) other metals put in deliberately (instead of 'contaminating' the batches of alu).
    Let me try to make it clearer. By using the word 'contaminated' I was referring to the fact that it would be certain that the metal, or as it would be more closely described as alloy when mixed, was not 100% aluminium. Other metals and alloys from the aircraft would also have been thrown into the furnace to produce these bells. They actually state on them that they are cast from 'METAL of German aircraft shot down over Britain 1939-1945'.

    If you are suggesting that the amount of metal available was, shall we say, 'deliberately' bulked out by using old iron railings or pots and pans as were collected during the 'Spitfire Fund' drives, there is no evidence that I can find that this was the case. If you can research it yourself for evidence that proves this I would be interested to hear of it, but as far as it goes I have little reason to doubt otherwise.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Victory Bell

    Nah, Ive no reason NOT to believe you.
    Merely suggesting that it might not have much of a impressive 'clang,' but then the symbolic value of the bell is of course far greater than any practical ringing value.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Victory Bell

    Quote by Scout View Post
    Nah, Ive no reason NOT to believe you.
    Merely suggesting that it might not have much of a impressive 'clang,' but then the symbolic value of the bell is of course far greater than any practical ringing value.
    You're right there, they don't 'clang', I've handled a few, and the term 'rattle' or 'clatter' springs to mind! they were as you say, purely symbolic in nature.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Victory Bell

    A nice item, it's a shame I haven't got one yet.
    I was round the carboot with my brother last year and I saw one sitting on a table. My brother beat me to it and got it 2.50 and he had no idea what it was -_-
    As Ned has already stated, there are numerous designs although I only recalling seeing three different ones. The main differences being the handle.

    Thank you for showing it, Glen.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Victory Bell

    Quote by big ned View Post
    Actually they were. They were cast by the Buckinghamshire Die Casting Co. Ltd of Burnham, from the remains of shot down German aircraft in the U.K. The design was from an American bell founder Conrad Parlanti of Berkeley, San Francisco, there were 3 slightly different designs that I know of, but may be more. The content was not solely aluminium, other metals contaminated some of the batches produced, which were sold in aid of the Royal Airforce Benevolent Fund directly after VE day in 1945. Indeed, the first ones auctioned were at the first Battle of Britain Dinner attended by survivors, and were auctioned off for as much as 1200, at the time a huge sum, by Chesney Allen of 'Flanagan & Allen' fame.

    Regards, Ned.
    And this is what makes the experience here so satisfying .. Thankyou very very much Ned, ...


    Scout
    Re: Victory Bell


    Merely suggesting that it might not have much of a impressive 'clang,' but then the symbolic value of the bell is of course far greater than any practical ringing value.
    Hi Scout


    Funnily enough it has nice clear "tone" when rung ,... although it definately doe's not "ring on" as a brass bell will, the note is "dampened" instantly.



    Glennyboy619
    Re: Victory Bell

    A nice item, it's a shame I haven't got one yet.
    I was round the carboot with my brother last year and I saw one sitting on a table. My brother beat me to it and got it 2.50 and he had no idea what it was -_-
    As Ned has already stated, there are numerous designs although I only recalling seeing three different ones. The main differences being the handle.

    Thank you for showing it, Glen.
    Hi Glen

    I'll keep an eye out , if I see another one about I'll give you a hoy .... one of the main e-trading sites down here is restricted to Aus-NZ participation only, quite a few interesting bits and pieces do the rounds that dont get out to the wider Global community, as the people who have them are not enthusiast's, as such, of Militaria, and happen by them usually on the passing of an elderly relative etc


    Here's a couple more "bits" I have .. cheers

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  10. #10

    Default Re: Victory Bell

    Nice,Kiwi63
    I reckon they are cool too.Heres mine for comparison.
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