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Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

Article about: Steve: Thanks for the follow-up on Mont Alto. It looks like Prusse was probably the engineer superintendent of construction on both the Deutschland and the Bremen. His official designation i

  1. #371

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Gentlemen,

    I posted this photo on another thread and drmessimer ID'd it as being the Deutschland, So I thought I'd post it here on the correct thread

    Anton


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	German fleet surrendering to the English. First German U-boat near the Towerbridge. London, Engl.jpg 
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  2. #372

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Thanks for sharing Your image shows the U-155, former submersible U-DEUTSCHLAND at St. Katharine Docks on the Thames River. Contributors to this thread had a great time identifying and sharing their knowledge of this tucked away location.

  3. #373

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Thought you ought you'd like to know that there is somewhat of an excitement here on Chesapeake Bay to be on the trail of a few descendants of those involved with escorting into or docking the U-DEUTSCHLAND at Baltimore in July 1916. Who can tell? If interviews are granted, our U-DEUTSCHLAND Centennial Committee may actually come up with some new images, first-hand written or passed-down accounts or mementos never before seen, heard or shown in public.

  4. #374

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    STBaltimote: I don't see the point of all this. König's written report to the Admiralstab on 28 August 1916 was in German and never appeared in any US newspaper or any other newspaper. It's among the Records of the German Navy, 1850-1945, MFP T1022, Roll 658, PG75197, NARA. In that report, he named the pilot boat Relief and Capt. Fred Cocke as the pilot he took aboard. If there was a change en route Baltimore he apparently didn't feel it warranted mention. As for the foot-high letters. They simply do not appear in any of the many photographs we have, and if they did exist, I don't see what importance that would be. In the photo below are her name and home port. Why would they paint the name on the deck? Dwight

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	5 baltimore quarantine 4.jpg 
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  5. #375

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Quote by drmessimer View Post
    I don't see the point of all this. König'... named the pilot boat Relief and Capt. Fred Cocke as the pilot he took aboard. If there was a change en route Baltimore he apparently didn't feel it warranted mention.
    After further review of my information I too admit to being wrong with using the name Cooke instead of Cocke, in fact it was Captain Frederick D. Cocke.

    Perhaps you will see the point as I progress with what is now known.

    Fred Cocke was the first American to board the U-DEUTSCHLAND upon it entering US waters. Interesting enough Cocke, who had no business boarding the submarine (and actually knew better) did so nonetheless, simply because he was nosy (and it paid off for him with subsequent newspaper notoriety).

    Upon passing the Capes, König had several blasts sounded on DEUTSCHLAND'S air whistle located on the fore edge of the superstructure. This signal, when entering Chesapeake Bay is a signal to the Maryland Pilots' Association boat stationed near the Capes to supply a pilot for a Baltimore-bound vessel. Captain C.O. Coleman was boarded on DEUTSCHLAND and the Virginia pilot, Captain Frederick D.Cocke departed. This was the account given by at least one crew member from a vantage point aboard the ST THOMAS F. TIMMINS.

    Quote by drmessimer View Post
    As for the foot-high letters. They simply do not appear in any of the many photographs we have, and if they did exist, I don't see what importance that would be...
    Looking down at a U-Boot's deck from Aeroplanes and Zeppelins perhaps? Might make a difference.

    Here again, just because you or I haven't actually seen such lettering, we ought not rule out an eye witness account of it, should we? As a case in point... Some might say that our recent timeline U-BREMEN/DEUTSCHLAND thread comparison photos have been most beneficial.
    Last edited by STBaltimore; 04-24-2012 at 08:05 PM. Reason: Reworking Code For Quotations

  6. #376

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    While we're on the subject of lettering and painting, allow me to offer something new to those in search of unique photographic images. May we continue to have fun as we re-discover many aspects of U-DEUTSCHLAND and her times.

    “Officials of the Eastern Forwarding company would give no information concerning the sailing of the Deutschland, or as to how far the stowing of the cargo had progressed…”

    “The painting of the Deutschland’s hull so that it harmonizes with the waters of the Atlantic, even to the whitecaps, has been completed.”

    Source: Geneva Daily [NY] Vol 22., No. 42., Tues. July 18, 1916, p. 1.

  7. #377

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    STBaltimore: With regard to historical research and which sources to accept as reliable and which sources to question, Eyewitness accounts and newspapers fall into the latter category and must be vetted against supporting evidence before they can be described as reliable. Maybe they did paint the boat's name on the deck, but we don't ave any verifiable sources to support that. And there is the question of why do it? If the reason is for identification by aircraft, the letters would have to be a lot larger than one foot high. In the end, it really doesn't matter if they did or did not paint the name on the deck, other than providing a pedant point of little or no historical value. I agree with you that turning up such pedant information is fun, but it still has to be established as factual before we can accept it at face value. Dwight

  8. #378

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    At all:

    Forget what I just wrote. It was rubbish! Sorry!

    Regards


    Claas
    Last edited by UBremen; 04-24-2012 at 08:01 PM. Reason: Removed my unqualified observations

  9. #379

    Talking Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Quote by drmessimer View Post
    Claas's collection humbles me, but I did find a few odds-and-ends in the garage.
    You're correct about that Herr Messimer and I especally like the image Claas has shared showing Paul and his daughter Mary at dockside, NYC. You too have a treasure trove of items Dwight and we thank you for them. Your attachment above, for instance, shows a great lineup for the health inspector at Quarantine Point and are respectively, from left-to-right, Baltimore City's Municipal Tug E.CLAY TIMANUS, the freighter U-DEUTSCHLAND, Escort Tug THOMAS F. TIMMINS and the little Launch EFCO. The Tug GREYHOUND should also be close at hand and a few others too. But what a great lineup, eh?

    Can I come play in your garage sometime?

  10. #380

    Cool Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Quote by drmessimer View Post
    STBaltimote: I don't see the point of all this... In the photo below are her name and home port. Why would they paint the name on the deck? Dwight

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	5 baltimore quarantine 4.jpg 
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    Ah! yes. and a fine picture it is too. But we mustn't take a photo at face value. If we did, we'd see three separate tuboats in the background of your image attachment above instead of three inserts of tugs, the THOMAS F. TIMMINS I'd think in two of the inserts and perhaps the E-CLAY TIMANUS (having a whitesided lifeboat) in the other.

    That is, of course, unless the tug wheelhouse shown on the left of the background grouping is itself either diving or surfacing. I must say that the wheelhouse cuts a fine wake though.

    Does anyone else see this as an early 20th century attempt at photo shop touch-up?

    Our site indicators show that "There are currently 24 users browsing this thread. (4 members and 20 guests)".

    Where are they all coming from?

    Did someone sound a klaxon horn perhaps? I hope so!

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