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Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

Article about: Steve: Thanks for the follow-up on Mont Alto. It looks like Prusse was probably the engineer superintendent of construction on both the Deutschland and the Bremen. His official designation i

  1. #391

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    STBaltimore: Either I'm missing something or I have already gone blind. But the link you provided shows only one photo, that of the tug and the U-Deutschland approaching her berth. But what I did see, is that as the U-deutschland approaches her berth, the Neckar appears to be in place on the opposite side of the berth where she was stationed. I find that interesting because in the photo I posted earlier of the U-Deutschland being pushed alongside the pier, there is a huge open area off her port side where the Neckar should be. What's happening here, other than probably camera angle? But if the Germans were trying to keep the public from seeing the U-Deutschland in her berth, why is there all that open space? Dwight


  2. #392

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Dwight: I just holding a book in my hand, called "The Merchant U-Boat, Adventures of the Deutschland" Look on page 52. There you can see the Neckar in the background and on side of U-Deutschland the Georg May
    I hope, I understood the problem...

    Regards
    Claas

  3. #393

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Claas,

    Thanks for cranking us back up. I lack having a copy of Dwight's tome, however, I suspect you are describing the image that shows the barge GEORGE MAY in the foreground, partially obscuring the U-DEUTSCHLAND from view. And, as you say, the NECKAR is looming visibly in the background.

    If this is the same photo I suspect it is, the scene you are describing was captured looking generally east while the picture-taker was on shore but in the vicinity of (or perhaps even aboard) the nearby pile driver.

    The image Dwight and I were earlier commenting on could have been taken by someone standing out on the south end of the McLean pier looking north (showing S.T. THOMAS F. TIMMINS on the port side of U-DEUTSCHLAND easing the sub into her Baltimore berth - starboard side to). The smaller motor-tug named EFCO, also belonging to and was operated by the Eastern Forwarding Company (hence its name E.F.C.O.), had already cast off from the sub's starboard side and may have been preparing to position a nearby scow aft of the submarine's stern once the TIMMINS had released her lines and slipped out away from the pier. As subsequent images show, the scow then was placed aft of U-DEUTSCHLAND'S stern, and tied between the GEORGE MAY and the pier's west side. This manœuvre , effectively created a physical security box around the submarine.

    For nautical purposes, inbound (or up river) at this pier, situated on the south side of the peninsular, would be to the west while outbound would, conversely, be east (travelling in the direction of Fort McHenry). I believe that the S.S. NECKAR would have been placed at the next pier outbound of the U-DEUTSCHLAND, but I am not certain of this, and would appreciate comments for others on that point.
    Last edited by STBaltimore; 05-01-2012 at 01:09 PM. Reason: Added link to additional EFCO history and photo image.

  4. #394

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Quote by drmessimer View Post
    ...in the photo I posted earlier of the U-Deutschland being pushed alongside the pier, there is a huge open area off her port side where the Neckar should be. What's happening here, other than probably camera angle? But if the Germans were trying to keep the public from seeing the U-Deutschland in her berth, why is there all that open space? Dwight
    In the image description you are referring to above, it is the GEORGE MAY (not the S.S. NECKAR) that has been moved out of the way and up river from the McLean Pier in order that the S.T. THOMAS F. TIMMINS can bring the U-DEUTSCHLAND in on the west side of the McLean Pier.

    The MAY was then nestled up to and secured on the sub's port side. Once that move was completed, the short stubby scow was moved in and secured aft of the submarine's stern. The NECKAR would have been outbound (and out of view in the image you are referring to) from McLean's Pier --- e.g. down river.

    Hope that helps explain the moves.
    Last edited by STBaltimore; 05-01-2012 at 01:12 PM.

  5. #395

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Claas: You're absolutlely right, the Neckar is where she belongs in the photo you described. I must have expressed myself poorly because I wasn't saying she wasn't in place. I thought the issue was when she took that position, and the photo I posted was just an attempt to help determine that. Sorry for the confusion. Dwight

  6. #396

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Look at numbers 5, 16, 17, 19, 25 and 26 and estimate their ages. For comparison, # 3, Eyring is 29; # 2, Krapohl is 37, and # 1, König is 49. I think that many of them look older than they are because of the way they are dressed and their mustaches. Three of the men in question are engineroom members, one is an ABS, one is a cook, and one is a steward. The press described the crew as "military age, except for two old salts." I think the two "old salts" are # 5 and 16, respectively a steward and a machinist. Let me know what you think. Dwight

  7. #397

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    While searching online for some U-Deutschland information, I came across this photo in a 1937 issue of The Coast Artillrty Journal. It was with an article on the defenses at Helgoland, and the caption is, "The submarine Deutschland returning from her first trip to America." Dwight
    Click image for larger version. 

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  8. #398

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Say BREMEN Started Aug. 14
    Germans Also Admit Renting Pier at New London

    Norfolk, Va., Aug. 21. – Captain Cullison of the tug HANSA, formerly the THOMAS F. TIMMINS, said today that it was true that the Eastern Forwarding Company, to which the cargo of the German submarine merchantman DEUTSCHLAND was assigned, had leased a pier at New London, Conn. Previous reports that such a step had been taken in anticipation of the arrival there of the BREMEN, sister ship of the DEUTSCHLAND, have been denied.

    It was reported in German circles here that the HANSA, which convoyed the DEUTSCHLAND in American waters, would go to New London before the end of the month and that much of the movable property of the Eastern Forwarding Company would be taken there from Baltimore. According to this story, the BREMEN left a German port Aug. 14.

    Source: NY Newspapers August 22nd 1916 (vessel name emphasis is mine)
    __________________________________________________ ______________________

  9. #399

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Recently, I had read that Krupp’s Germania Werft in Kiel was to have built the U-DEUTSCHLAND while Weser A.G. in Bremen built the smaller U-BREMEN. If the U-BREMEN at 500 tons capacity, in fact was a smaller version of the 700 plus ton capacity U-DEUTSCHLAND, wouldn’t this make the pair of submersibles a bit less than sister ships?

  10. #400

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    STBaltimore: Did you find that in Tin-Pots and Pirate Ships: Canadian Naval Forces and German Sea Raiders 1880-1918? I saw it too. I have not seen the reference, but both boats were built under the auspices of Germaniawerft with the pressure hulls done by A.G. Weser and Germania doing the final fitting-out. The basic design was drawn by Krupp's Oberingenieur, Rudolf Erbach, and both boats were essentially identical. That small differences existed between the boats, we know from our observations and discussions on this forum. Dwight

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