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Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

Article about: Steve: Thanks for the follow-up on Mont Alto. It looks like Prusse was probably the engineer superintendent of construction on both the Deutschland and the Bremen. His official designation i

  1. #591

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    St.Baltimore,

    I am good, but I am also having a hard time making a connection between our two U-boats of interest and the WW ll, Nazi, cruiser Emden. Other than both vessels were German made, and crewed by Germans I am at a loss. I am good, but that’s pushing it. If you can keep it in the same war, I promise I can come up with a good connection.

    By the way, Dwight I ordered that chart of the Orkney Islands yesterday. I think it will work nicely for what we need.



    Zuke

  2. #592

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    The connection was not only with the landmark feature of the Recreation Pier, but in the 20 year timeline since the DUETSCHLAND made its visit.

    The fact that Koenig had been dead but three years and (even though I didn't say it in my post) that Mayor Jackson was at both the arrival of the EMDEN and the September 1933 memorial service for Paul Koenig, is as noteworthy as Koenig and his daughter arriving for touring visits in the United States on numerous occasions or Koenigs final resting place.

  3. #593

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Steve and others: I'll be glad to send you photos of the ships I have built, but like the Emden, the HMS Baralong is a bit of a stretch for this thread. To use an appropriately nautical term, Stay the Course. Dwight

  4. #594

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    This is the translation of Paul König's radio address on 31 August 1916 that Claas provided. Dwight

    Narrator: A commercial submarine brings essential supplies from the USA. On its return, the commander, Captain König says:

    König: The old enterprising Hansa spirit applied its driving force to the world's first commercial submarine, Deutschland, that despite the English blockade, went to America and back to the homeland. I thank the local providence and the crew for its sense of duty and courage to undergo the strains of the voyage. Serving the cause of peaceful trade in the middle of the World, the pro-German feeling in America, and Deutschland's voyage are-three fold evidence that Germany has an unbroken supply line, and our first duty is to maintain the ideals of the Freedom of the Seas in our future voyages.

  5. #595

    Thumbs up Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Quote by drmessimer View Post
    This is the translation of Paul König's radio address on 31 August 1916 that Claas provided. Dwight
    We thank you both for sewing up another piece of the U-DEUTSCHLAND fabric

  6. #596

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    New London, Conn. 16: -- A persistent report that the German submersible Bremen would arrive here within a wk. gained credence by the arrival in the city today of the manager of the German Ocean Transportation Company which operates the submarines, and of G. Prusso [sic] who is credited with having constructed the Deutschland and who was a passenger on that submarine when it arrived in Baltimore.

    Source: The Tribune, Nassau Bahamas, Tues, Sept 19, 1916 pg 2.

  7. #597

    Arrow Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Quote by drmessimer View Post
    STBaltimore: Great looking model and undoubtedly built from scratch. Where did you find it? Dwight
    You simple have to revisit post 575 and click on "Seite 3" to see the rest of the site images. When you first see the link it doesn't seem to make itself readily apparent does it? Sorry about that,

  8. #598

    Unhappy Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    Quote by drmessimer View Post
    I'll add a distressing note to St Baltimore's interesting post regarding UC42...

    The site, first and foremost, is a war grave, with up to 27 individuals having drowned when it sank in September 1917.

    To date, [there have been] reports of the structure being recently damaged by divers attempting to remove parts of it, of items that belonged to the crew being taken off the site and that one of the propellers was being made ready to be recovered, as evidenced by recent work to it.

    The site has a particular sensitivity due to it being a relatively recent German naval loss with crew who are known by name, many of who are likely to have close living relatives. The German Embassy has indicated its legitimate interest in its protection, preservation and non-disturbance.

    Dwight
    The above is interesting. Seems, however, that not all wreck sites are quite as revered:

    "WASHINGTON (NNS) -- The Navy announced Feb. 21 [2013] that the March 8 graveside interment ceremony of the remains of two unknown Sailors recovered from the USS Monitor shipwreck will be open to the public at Arlington National Cemeterey [sic].

    The unknown Sailors were lost along with 14 of their shipmates when Monitor sank off Cape Hatteras, N.C. on Dec. 31, 1862.

    All 16 Sailors will be memorialized on a group marker in section 46 of the cemetery, which is between the amphitheater and the USS Maine Mast memorial.

    The specific date of the interment was chosen to recognize the Monitor's role in the Battle of Hampton Roads 151 years ago.

    It is Navy custom and tradition to honor the service member's final resting place by conducting an official burial ceremony. [I somehow always thought that the final resting place for these sailors would have been at the U.S.S. MONITOR'S wreck site off of Cape Hatteras]

    The chapel service is by invitation only. Members of the public may attend the interment, which begins at approximately 4:30 p.m., but will not be involved in and/or participate directly in the funeral procession or graveside service. [The above was not the case when the third and final Confederate Submarine HUNLEY crew were buried at Charleston, SC - It was totally a public procession and burial - I attended]

    Driving to the gravesite will not be permitted. Attendees may park in the ANC Welcome Center parking garage and either walk or take, for a fee, the Martz tour tram to the Amphitheater. [for a fee?]

    For those wishing to attend in period costume, cemetery regulations stipulate that no weapons, to include historic weapons [even ceremonial swords?], are allowed.

    Groups should contact Stuart McLean, director, Ceremonies and Special Events for Naval District Washington at (202) 433-4690.

    For more information on the cemetery location, parking and transportation, visit www.arlingtoncemetery.mil."

    Zuke, Dwight and others, might want to take the above comments into especial consideration whilst conducting on-going chart searches for U-BREMEN, somewhere on a course to America.

    Quote by Steve Zuke View Post
    By the way, Dwight I ordered that chart of the Orkney Islands yesterday. I think it will work nicely for what we need. Zuke

  9. #599

    Default Tangibles For U-Deutschland 100th - Artifacts, Models, Landmarks und More

    I have the honor to provide our kind readers with a worthy image showing the extant Baltimore pier where Captain Koenig and his crew were received, where the captain had a medal bestowed upon him and from whence the captain, the city's mayor and the German ambassador to America embarked for a July of 1916 tour of U-DEUTSCHLAND, then moored at South Locust Point.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The view is from an alongside vessel showing the second deck pier entrance into the ballroom.

    The vessel used for the tour is the city's 1906 municipal Steam Tug BALTIMORE. She still bobs about across the harbor and in sight of the Broadway pier.
    Last edited by STBaltimore; 03-01-2013 at 05:34 PM. Reason: grammar

  10. #600

    Default Re: Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

    STBaltimore,
    I really would not worry about us finding the U-Bremen in our paper search. Even if we did, we don’t even have a paper sub to go looking for it. Now with that said, I got the chart we were looking for, and it is a good one. The problem is it does not tell you what the bottom is like, mud, sandy, bedrock, coral, etc.. “IF” the U-Bremen sank in the channel between Scotland and the Orkney Islands, what are the chances of it being buried in the sea floor? Would any of our forum readers have any first hand knowledge they would be willing to share?

    Steve

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