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Cargo Submarine U-Deutschland Artifacts and Model

Article about: Steve: Thanks for the follow-up on Mont Alto. It looks like Prusse was probably the engineer superintendent of construction on both the Deutschland and the Bremen. His official designation i

  1. #751

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    What an interesting thread.At one time I really wanted to serve in submarines I was heavily influenced by a neighbour an ex royal navy sub man(WW2)who built his own one man sub.I have heard of subs that could launch seaplanes and of course mini subs but never heard of a purpose made cargo sub,Thanks for posting.



    Jon

  2. #752

    Default

    Claas,

    I am intrigued by your HANDELS U-BOOT DEUTSCHLAND hat ribbon in the image below (and found in posting No. 529)

    Quote by UBremen View Post



    Regards
    Claas
    The letters appear to be stamped onto the cloth ribbon instead of embroidered, unless the faded portions of a few letters seem to have been soiled. Which might it be, please? Also, I have a question about the flag. Was it embroidered directly onto the ribbon or was it made as a separate piece and sewn to the ribbon?

    I don't recall seeing photographic images of any of the crew wearing the traditional navy flat hats, have you?

    Danke,

  3. #753

    Smile

    Port of Baltimore, MD, U.S.A. -- September 15, 2013: -- From the decks of the World's first nuclear-powered merchant ship, Savannah, the Baltimore & Chesapeake Steamboat Company (B&CSC) and the German Society of Maryland co-hosted the 80th anniversary observance of a maritime pioneer, U-Boat skipper Paul Lebrecht Koenig (1867-1933).

    Why such an honor? As a maritime pioneer, Captain Koenig commanded the world's first merchant submarine, the 1916-launched U-Deutschland, a vessel he had helped develop and test for the German Ocean Navigation Company, a venture created by Alfred Lohmann.

    Captain Koenig skippered the first-ever cargo-carrying submersible on its maiden trans-Atlantic voyage. Much like the nuclear cargo/passenger merchant vessel N.S. Savannah, Deutschland became the first submarine freighter ever to cross the Atlantic Ocean unaided, travelling from Bremen, Germany, arriving at Baltimore on July 10th, 1916, to enthusiastic crowds. Koenig and the crew of Deutschland would make a second merchant voyage to America in November of 1916, putting in at New London, Connecticut.

    Two presentations were given at the recent memorial. The first was “An Historic Voyage: Koenig and the U-Deutschland,” by Maizie Rocke, vice president of the B&CSC, and historian Valerie Mathers, which included readings from Captain Koenig’s 1916 book about his exploits, Voyage of the Deutschland: the First Merchant Submarine. Historian Walt Mathers then presented “Of Maritime Pioneers,” which included insights placing Koenig’s achievements within the larger context of maritime accomplishments.

    In connecting the dots, Mathers added that "Many of the systems that are said to have gone in to constructing the Deutschland came directly from designs invented by American-born Simon Lake. Like Koenig, both Lake and his major competitor, John P. Holland, were maritime pioneers. They built first-ever innovative submarines at the Port of Baltimore during the turn of the 19th century."

    A memorial wreath was cast from the decks of N.S. Savannah, which is moored across from Quarantine Point, the location where U-Deutschland first dropped its anchor in American waters. Words were also offered for Deutschland's sister ship, U-Bremen, lost-at-sea on its maiden voyage.

    Wherever Koenig or the crew of Deutschland were known to be traveling, bands of musicians would magically appear to play the popular "Wacht am Rhein" ("Watch on the Rhine"). At various times the crew themselves were called upon to sing a few verses, a capella. At Sunday's anniversary memorial, the Dockenspielers provided musical selections accompanied by singer Ms. Beth Schlegel, courtesy of the German Society of Maryland. “Die Wacht am Rhein”, offered during the seaside ceremony was presented as a slow march and caused attendees to reflect on the perils of the sea associated with being pioneers.

    The B&CSC presented Captain Michael Setzer, German Navy and Naval Attaché stationed in Washington, DC, and Naval Architect Erhard Koehler, Project Manager for the N.S. Savannah, with copies of _20,000 Leagues Under the Sea_, written by Jules Verne. Ms. Rocke stated that, “It is only right that we end this observance on an appropriate nautical note, for another pioneer captain, Captain Koenig, received this book upon leaving Baltimore on August 2, 1916, to make his return trip to Germany.“

    Also in attendance were Dr. David Denisch, a collateral descendant of Captain Koenig and Lottie and Howard Hirsch, who operate the Live and Learn toy store in Ownings Mills, Maryland. Mr. Hirsch is the grandson of Ludwig Schwarzschild, the youngest crew member of the U-Deutschland, Schwarzschild served as a mechanic in the engine room.

    There were numerous memorial services held in 1933 upon the death of Paul Koenig. Only two locations known outside of the German-speaking countries held services for Captain Koenig. Both tributes were rendered in America with one at New York City and the other in Baltimore.

    Captain Setzer, a former submarine commander himself, rang 8 bells on Savannah’s ship bell, a signal for a changing of the watch. Thus ended the 80th anniversary remembrance ceremony for Paul Koenig, a true maritime pioneer.

    Sic Transit Gloria Mundi

    __________________________________________________ ___________________________

    Plans to host U-Deutschland’s centennial are currently 'underway' at the Port of Baltimore, and are set to occur during early July of 2016. Those interested in serving on the U-DEUTSCHLAND Centennial Cyber-Committee are asked to contact the Baltimore & Chesapeake Steamboat Company below. The 2016 event committee would stand to benefit by having agent-representatives on both sides of the Atlantic.

    The Baltimore & Chesapeake Steamboat Company, formed in 2004, is an all-volunteer non-profit educational organization that preserves, interprets and supports industrial maritime heritage efforts at the Port of Baltimore and throughout the Chesapeake Bay Region. Contact them at: steamboatcompany at yahoo dot com, or visit their website at: BayHeritage.org They are also on Facebook and would be happy should you wish to friend them.

    The nonprofit German Society of Maryland, established in 1783 and incorporated at Annapolis, Maryland in 1817 maintains offices at: 15 W Mt Vernon Place, Baltimore, MD, 21201. Visit them at: www.germansociety-md.com

    ~~30~~

  4. #754

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    I am going to reopen a can of worms and ask for your thoughts and opinions. I don’t mean that your thoughts and opinions are a can of worms, what I mean is that the subject is a can of worms. I am in the process of writing the chapter on collecting Deutschland artifacts. But I have reservations about including these two items because I think that they might not actually be Deutschland artifacts
    First up is this pendant, an example of which is displayed in the Deutsches Schiffahrtsmuseum in Bremerhaven. It has the sharp detail and general appearance of the Hans Schuler designed pendant that Interboro Medal and Badge Company made in New York. Unlike the identified Schuler design, this pendant has a different likeness of the Deutschland, makes no claim of having been made from Deutschland ballast, and omits the 9 in the July 1916 date. And unlike the Schuler design, the text is entirely in German. There is little doubt that this device was sold to raise money for aid to POWs in Siberia inasmuch as the phrase, In Anerkennung Ihrer den Sibiriengefangenen Erwiesenenhilfe means In recognition of your proven aid to the Siberian prisoners, and Kriegsgefangenen Fuesorge New York (War Prisoners Relief New York) appears to be the Prisoners of War Relief Committee in New York. I think that this pendant was struck from some metal other than the Deutschland’s cast iron ballast, and is not a genuine Deutschland artifact.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    This 3.25 inch by 2 inch tablet might be a fantasy item, but I am not sure of that. There are two versions of this that have been floating around since at least 1990. Both are very similar to one another, but each has an entirely different likeness of the Deutschland. The boxed example purports to have been made under the auspices of the Prisoners of War Relief Committee headquartered at 24 North More Street in New York City. But it features the oncoming submarine that is identical to the Schuler design used on the pendant that Interboro made. But that design was done for the American Relief Committee for Widows and Orphans of the War in Germany not for the Prisoners of War Relief Committee.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    This second version has a sort of gold color and features the Deutschland likeness that is used on the pendant shown above, and might have been commissioned by the Prisoners of War Relief Committee.
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    Some of the tablets appear to have the Interboro stamp in the lower left corner, but Interboro did not make cast items. Their products were die stamped. Since the Deutschland carried no lead aboard, and her ballast was entirely cast iron, any of these that are not made of cast iron are fakes. And regardless of the metal from which they are made, if they are cast and have the Interboro stamp, they are also fakes. But my question is: has any one actually seen and handled one of these that was not made of lead or pewter? If you have, please post photos showing the detail and especially the Interboro stamp. And test it with a magnet to be sure it’s ferrous metal. At the moment I have real reservations about using these as examples of Deutschland artifacts. Dwight
    Last edited by drmessimer; 09-25-2013 at 07:44 PM.

  5. #755

    Question Commemorative Centennial Ribbon Question

    Quote by UBremen View Post
    Hello my friends,
    [The ribbon below] ... is a Vivat band:


    Regards

    Claas
    We'd like to make 100 year vivats (remembrance ribbons) leading up to the U-DEUTSCHLAND and U-BREMEN Centennial in 2016. They could be produced both in German and English. Anyone want to suggest appropriate text for the layout? It would be great to retain most if not all of the artwork above.

    Thanks for sharing the image Claas. -- STB

  6. #756

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    Quote by STBaltimore View Post
    Claas,

    I am intrigued by your HANDELS U-BOOT DEUTSCHLAND hat ribbon in the image below (and found in posting No. 529)



    The letters appear to be stamped onto the cloth ribbon instead of embroidered, unless the faded portions of a few letters seem to have been soiled. Which might it be, please? Also, I have a question about the flag. Was it embroidered directly onto the ribbon or was it made as a separate piece and sewn to the ribbon?

    I don't recall seeing photographic images of any of the crew wearing the traditional navy flat hats, have you?

    Danke,
    The letters and the flag are directly stiched on the ribbon. The flag is not a separate part.
    The crew members does not worn that flat hat, because they are civilian sailors.

    Regards
    Claas

  7. #757

    Default U-Deutschland Game

    Here’s an advertisement from a November, 1916 issue of The Fatherland magazine selling a U-Deutschland game.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  8. #758

    Thumbs up

    Quote by Lord Page View Post
    What an interesting thread.... never heard of a purpose-made cargo sub,Thanks for posting.

    Jon
    The longer we live, the more we learn. Ain't life great?

  9. #759

    Question

    Quote by UBremen View Post
    The letters and the flag are directly stiched on the ribbon. The flag is not a separate part.
    The crew members does not worn that flat hat, because they are civilian sailors.

    Regards
    Claas
    Hallo Claas,

    If the ribbons weren't produced to serve as adornment on flat hats as tallys, I wonder what purpose they would have served? How were these ribbons used if not on head gear. They weren't designed to be vivats were they?

    http://www.fundomsmilitary.com/img/prod/120-1.jpg

  10. #760

    Default

    Claas might have a specific answer to StBaltimore's question, but my guess is that it's a fantasy piece that sold on Ebay at one time or another. The fact that it exists doesn't mean it's genuine or that it actually had any purpose than to make a buck through sales. Claas is right when he says that the Deutschland crewmen did not wear the flat hat while assigned to the Deutschland. When they were returned to active naval duty in February 1917 they did again wear the navy flat hat but the tallies represented whatever units they were assigned to, and the Handels-U-Boot-Deutschland was not one of them. Dwight

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