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Die Deutsche Ehrendenkmünze des Weltkrieges

Article about: For lack of a designated Weimar-era sub-forum, I felt it most appropriate to post this thread in the “Imperial Germany and Austro-Hungary” one. Here is my latest acquisition: A nice example

  1. #11

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    Just in, here is a three-place medal bar combining the Ehrendenkmünze with the 1914 EK2 and, again, the Kriegsdenkmünze 1914/18 des Kyffhäuserbundes. These two medals were often seen side by side:


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  2. #12

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    Thank you for posting these Andreas!
    One I had not known about, nor noticed before. I like this award and will likely keep my eyes open for one now.
    Ralph.
    Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stamm. Kp. Pz. Erz. Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

  3. #13
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    Great topic and nice bars etc - Just wondering why these were called "Ehrendenkmunze" - the word "munze" translated indicates "Coin" not medal - Just a question on my part -
    Horst
    "He who hesitates is lost - is not only lost but miles from the next exit"

  4. #14

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    Quote by Horst View Post
    Great topic and nice bars etc - Just wondering why these were called "Ehrendenkmunze" - the word "munze" translated indicates "Coin" not medal - Just a question on my part -
    A good question (which, of course, means "I have no idea, even as a native speaker of German").

    Apparently, it is a traditional/archaic use of the term Münze by which it can refer to a medal rather than a coin.

    Various 19th century medals awarded by German states for the wars of 1813-15, 1864 and 1870-71 had been also been called Kriegsdenkmünzen.
    The creators of the Ehrendenkmünze and the Kyffhäuserbund's 1914/18 Kriegsdenkmünze surely considered their own medals to be in this long and proud tradition.

  5. #15

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    Well, it didn't take long before the next addition (but the price was good): A two-place medal bar once more combining the Ehrendenkmünze (with Kampfabzeichen) and the Kriegsdenkmünze 1914/18 des Kyffhäuserbundes.


    Obverse view. The bar is clearly showing its age, with patina on the medals and wear and fading to the ribbons:

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    Obverse view, with the bar turned around and the medals flipped over to show their reverse sides. A different, yellow-and blue medal ribbon can be made out behind them:

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    Reverse view. A few pinholes are visible as is a less-faded spot where a label of some kind (perhaps just a dealer's price tag) once was:

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    The bar is lacking any kind of pin-and hinge assembly or other means of attachment. Perhaps it was attached with safety pins, or it was not actually worn at all: I would consider it possible that the medals have been removed from a longer bar after they were banned from further wear in 1934 and then assembled into this mounting to be kept as souvenirs, perhaps displayed in a frame or case. (The backing is cloth-covered cardboard, by the way.) All just speculation, of course...

  6. #16
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    Nice bar. Once I had two place Weimar bar (EK2 and Kyffhäuser) that was without reverse hardware as well. And as soon as EK2 was not banned for further wear in 1934, I think these were regular bars probably attached with safety pins, as you already mentioned.

  7. #17

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    Quote by Miro View Post
    And as soon as EK2 was not banned for further wear in 1934, I think these were regular bars probably attached with safety pins, as you already mentioned.
    I'm afraid I can't quite follow you... The EK2 was not banned from wear during the Weimar years.

  8. #18
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    Quote by HPL2008 View Post
    I'm afraid I can't quite follow you... The EK2 was not banned from wear during the Weimar years.
    Did I really say it was? Then sorry, English is not my native language. I meant the opposite. EK2 1914 was never banned for wear. And because I had it on similar bar (i. e. without reverse hardware), I think these bars (without reverse hardware) were not souvenir displays (of banned pieces), but regular (probably low cost) medal bars. I hope now it makes sense.

    Miro

  9. #19

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    Quote by Miro View Post
    Did I really say it was? Then sorry, English is not my native language. I meant the opposite. EK2 1914 was never banned for wear. And because I had it on similar bar (i. e. without reverse hardware), I think these bars (without reverse hardware) were not souvenir displays (of banned pieces), but regular (probably low cost) medal bars. I hope now it makes sense.
    Sure does. Thanks for clearing it up.

  10. #20

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    There were two different basic types of award document for the medal (with minor variants each). A large one of very elaborate design, and a somewhat simpler and smaller one introduced in 1923. I have recently acquired an example of the latter.

    Obverse of the document, which is made out to Mr. Hermann Petry of Cassel (older spelling of Kassel). The rank designation Oberjäger was used by the Jägertruppe (light infantry) instead of Unteroffizier [Corporal].
    The facsimile signature is that of the Legion's Ordenskanzler [Order Chancellor], Rudolf-Hering Deutschwehr, a former army Hauptmann [Captain]. It measures 24 x 17 cm:

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    The reverse certifies the award holder's membership in the Ehrenlegion, into which he was accepted on 11th June 1924 with membership no. 891,092. Only the handwritten date and number are clearly legible, the stamps having faded away over the decades:

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