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German units near Armentieres June 12, 1918

Article about: Any one have any idea of what German Infantry regiments were just north of Armentieres on the 12th of June 1918? I am researching an RAF pilot who was shot down and captured 13 miles north-w

  1. #1

    Default German units near Armentieres June 12, 1918

    Any one have any idea of what German Infantry regiments were just north of Armentieres on the 12th of June 1918? I am researching an RAF pilot who was shot down and captured 13 miles north-west of Armentieres. He stated that he ended up being held in a farm house that had previously been the battalion HQ for a regiment of Welsh Fusiliers. Thanks in advance for your time.
    Tom

  2. #2

    Default Re: German units near Armentieres June 12, 1918

    Quote by Croix de Guerre View Post
    Any one have any idea of what German Infantry regiments were just north of Armentieres on the 12th of June 1918? I am researching an RAF pilot who was shot down and captured 13 miles north-west of Armentieres. He stated that he ended up being held in a farm house that had previously been the battalion HQ for a regiment of Welsh Fusiliers. Thanks in advance for your time.
    Tom
    Nothing huh? Any ideas where one might begin to look?

  3. #3

    Default Re: German units near Armentieres June 12, 1918

    Tom: The reference you want is available online as a free download in PDF format. The title is, Histories of Two Hundred and Fifty-One Divisions of the German Army Which Participated in the War (1914-1918) It was prepared by the AEF HQ at Chaumont, France in 1919, and published by the Government Printing Office in 1920
    Simply enter the title in the Google search engine and you will get at least two hits on that title. Or you can go directly to www. Scribd .com where you will sign up by providing your email address, a user name, and a password. There is no charge for signing up and the download is free. The other source is Google Books which might also offer a free PDF download. Dwight
    Last edited by drmessimer; 01-11-2012 at 06:15 PM.

  4. #4

    Default Re: German units near Armentieres June 12, 1918

    Tom: I forgot to add in the above post that you should start by looking at the Bavarian 4th and 6th Divisions, both of which were under Prince Ruppricht of Bavaria's command and which fought in the area you are interested in. Dwight

  5. #5

    Default Re: German units near Armentieres June 12, 1918

    Dwight, YOU ARE THE MAN! Thank you so very much! I've been working on this book for some time now and I always thought it would be cool to try and figure out which regiment initially captured my pilot after he was shot down. The soldaten treated him very well by all accounts, especially so after they found out he was an American. One gaurd spoke a little English and explained that his brother lived in Chicago and drove a brewery wagon there. He went on to explain that he hoped to immigrate to Chicago after the wat and join his brother in his high calling. My pilot had a little fun with him and told him he should run for mayor as soon as he arrived. Thanks again Dwight!

  6. #6

    Default Re: German units near Armentieres June 12, 1918

    Tom: What is the name of the pilot you are researching? I have a small file on US citizens who were in the RFC, RAF, and the French air arm in WWI that might have information you can use. Many of the Americans who flew for the Allies, and were captured, were sent to POW camps that held primarily Americans, even though they were not flying for the Americans when they were captured. Villingen was the main American camp, though there were other POW camps for American EM. If your subject was in an American POW camp, his name and the transfer reports are probably in the Records of the American National Red Cross, 1917-34. Files Pertaining to Bureau of Prisoners Information and Communication, 6 April 1917-31 December 1918, RG200, National Archives, College Park, MD. Another possible source of information might be RG242, Microfilm Publication T1022, Roll 42, Ser. M, vols. 6-11, "Experiences of Air Service Officers Who Were Prisoners of War." But that is rather a long-shot. One last suggestion. I have a large chart showing the structure of the Royal Bavarian Army, 1914-18 (Könlich Bayerische Armee, 1914-18), which is very uiseful and is actually available online. If you enter either the English or German title in Google, it will take you to at least two sources for the chart. The online chart is a PNG file that allows you to enlarge it so that it is easily read. If you have any questions, you can email me directly at drmessimer@aol.com or through the Forum's PM system. Good luck with you research. Dwight

  7. #7

    Default Re: German units near Armentieres June 12, 1918

    From a quick search it looks as if elements of the 10th Bavarian most likely fit the bill at this point.

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