Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Ww1 german medals

Article about: I have the opportunity to buy some really neat ww1 and ww2 medals but their are a few i can not identify including these 2 below. Yes their are 3 altogether but the one that kind of looks li

  1. #1

    Default Ww1 german medals

    I have the opportunity to buy some really neat ww1 and ww2 medals but their are a few i can not identify including these 2 below. Yes their are 3 altogether but the one that kind of looks like a ribbon is linked to the other 2. I just put that one in their for reference. I have identified the one that looks like a ribbon but not the other 2. They all are from the same person, they all have the same name, just different dates. So if anyone could help me out on identifying what they are and what they were awarded for, that would be great. Also what they might be worth or where I could identify their worth.

    Thanks
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20160316_121804.jpg 
Views:	120 
Size:	236.5 KB 
ID:	944819   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20160316_121740.jpg 
Views:	124 
Size:	235.6 KB 
ID:	944820  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20160316_121717.jpg 
Views:	289 
Size:	237.6 KB 
ID:	944821   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20160316_121641.jpg 
Views:	103 
Size:	234.2 KB 
ID:	944822  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20160316_121746.jpg 
Views:	133 
Size:	234.6 KB 
ID:	944826   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20160316_121547.jpg 
Views:	63 
Size:	232.2 KB 
ID:	944823  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20160316_121445.jpg 
Views:	77 
Size:	230.1 KB 
ID:	944824   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20160316_121428.jpg 
Views:	87 
Size:	235.7 KB 
ID:	944825  


  2. #2
    ?

    Default

    The Prussian one is a war veteran's membership badge with a 25 year kyffhaeuser attachment at the top.

    The other two look like shooting club medals but that's only my opinion, I have nothing to back it up. Hopefully someone else can confirm whether they are or not.

    I always thought Pfand had something to do with a pawn shop (Pfandhaus), I wonder what it means on the medals?

    Tony

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote by ynot View Post
    The Prussian one is a war veteran's membership badge with a 25 year kyffhaeuser attachment at the top.

    The other two look like shooting club medals but that's only my opinion, I have nothing to back it up. Hopefully someone else can confirm whether they are or not.

    I always thought Pfand had something to do with a pawn shop (Pfandhaus), I wonder what it means on the medals?
    Correct.

    The term Pfand is used in shooting competitions of a certain traditional type, in which the target has the shape of a bird (usually an eagle), whose individual elements (head, tail, left and right wing etc.) have to be hit in a specific sequence. These elements are called Pfand (plural Pfänder), the competitions are called Pfänderschießen.

    The medals are for the first prize in the 1928 and 1931 shooting competitions held at Brauweiler near Cologne. (No military- or WW1 connection.)

  4. #4
    ?

    Default

    Quote by HPL2008 View Post
    Correct.

    The term Pfand is used in shooting competitions of a certain traditional type, in which the target has the shape of a bird (usually an eagle), whose individual elements (head, tail, left and right wing etc.) have to be hit in a specific sequence. These elements are called Pfand (plural Pfänder), the competitions are called Pfänderschießen.

    The medals are for the first prize in the 1928 and 1931 shooting competitions held at Brauweiler near Cologne. (No military- or WW1 connection.)

    Thanks for confirming my thoughts and for explaining the meaning of Pfand.

  5. #5

    Default

    Thank you so much for shinning some light on these for me. This helps a lot. I wonder why these 2 medals were in with all the other ww1 and 2 medals and these being not military related. With all the various medals in the tin can.

    Since the 3rd veterans 25 year of service medal was given why wouldn't these 2 not be military related?

  6. #6
    MAP
    MAP is online now
    ?

    Default

    Quote by theinvester View Post
    Thank you so much for shinning some light on these for me. This helps a lot. I wonder why these 2 medals were in with all the other ww1 and 2 medals and these being not military related. With all the various medals in the tin can.

    Since the 3rd veterans 25 year of service medal was given why wouldn't these 2 not be military related?
    Do you know if they were all awarded to the same person? If so, who's to say that he was not a WW1 vet who then joined shooting competitions in the 20's/30's? Maybe it was a grouping of Father/Son since some medals were from WW1 and others were from WW2. Or maybe he served in both wars.

    Unless there was some provenance/story that these came from, there are endless theories as to why they were all together.

    M
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote by theinvester View Post
    Since the 3rd veterans 25 year of service medal was given why wouldn't these 2 not be military related?
    Because they simply aren't.

    One is a pin for 25 years membership in a veteran's association (not 25 years of service in the military) and the other two for local shooting competitions. (Civilian shooting competitions.)

    None are military, trust me on this one.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote by HPL2008 View Post
    Because they simply aren't.

    One is a pin for 25 years membership in a veteran's association (not 25 years of service in the military) and the other two for local shooting competitions. (Civilian shooting competitions.)

    None are military, trust me on this one.
    Absolutely, and no mystery here to my mind.

    I understand the almost natural assumption of those unfamiliar with such items that these have a military connection as I certainly have seen many included amongst the ephemera and souvenirs of military men. However, as HPL2008 says there is no actual military link other than possibly a cultural one.

    As I recall from my time living in Germany most towns that originated independantly rather than out of larger cities, many of the size we in the UK would call villages, have something known as a Schutzverein. In English we would call this a shooting association and these originate in medieval times as a kind of local defence force or militia and survive today as social groups centred on the shooting sports. As such they tend to have festivals each year a bit like our village fetes. The homes of the association officials are usually decorated with military sounding titles such as "Hochleben (or is it Hochsitz? I can't really remember) der Adjutant / Major / Leutnant (hope I have recalled those correctly) but again none of these have any connection to military service. At festival times the whole town is decorated in typical style with flowers and ribbon and processions with association members in costume with bands etc take place. Very colourful, culturally relevant and (certainly during my time there) viewed with great respect by the people in general. All grounded in culture and history but definately not military. Similar associations exist in Austria, Switzerland and parts of Belgium (even the USA and other countries with ethnic German communities I believe).

    In terms of collecting I would put these in the same category as Freemasons "Masonic Jewels" which also have the appearance of medals.

    I hope this is helpful and not too far "off the mark" to use a shooting term

    Regards

    Mark
    Last edited by Watchdog; 03-19-2016 at 11:56 AM. Reason: typo
    "War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. A man who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing he cares more about than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature with no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."

  9. #9

    Default

    Mark has described the tradition, nature and relevance of such shooting associations very well.

    Practically every German small town or village has or used to have a veterans' association [Kriegerverein], a shooting club [Schützenverein] and a volunteer fire brigade [Freiwillige Feuerwehr].

    Nowadays, they often struggle to find new members, but back in the Imperial/Weimar/Third Reich days and the early post-war decades, these organizations were extremely important for community life, and in villages/rural areas just about every adult male was a member of at least one of them.

Similar Threads

  1. WW1 German medals

    In Imperial Germany and Austro-Hungary
    01-24-2013, 01:05 PM
  2. german medals

    In Orders & Decorations of the Third Reich
    01-14-2012, 06:46 PM
  3. German medals

    In Orders & Decorations of the Third Reich
    02-20-2011, 12:49 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •