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98 sword

Article about: Hello Gents, I just found this sword and the seller offered me some photos as below. Is it good? The maker mark seems to be "固山宗兵衛宗次

  1. #11
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    You really need to present those you ask for an appraisal with much MUCH better pics/close-ups taken in natural light.

    We are talking about guys who knows their field and you owe it to them to provide quality pics...

    ....just saying

  2. #12

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    Hello Stu,
    Many thanks for your information & links about the books and knowledge!
    For sure, I need go through these "gold mines".
    Hehe
    And it seems to me that there are so many fakes here in China.
    Really tough task to make choices and decision.
    But I will not spend any money until i know something about the swords.
    Of course, the swords have to be approved by our forum EXPERTs before I make the payment.
    I really enjoy the time when I chat with all of kind gents like you.
    Have a nice weekend!
    Best regards,
    Wolfgang

  3. #13

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    Hello Scout,
    Yes, of course, you are right.
    Close-up photos in good natural light should be offered by the seller.
    I will push him to take photos with much better quality for the gents.
    Cheers,
    Wolfgang

  4. #14
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    Hello Wolfgang,

    You may find these two linked sites of assistance as you learn more about gunto.

    a13N藤RR Army commissioned officers Shin-Gunto 1938

    And

    JAPANESE MILITARY SWORDS - I

    Regards,
    Stu

  5. #15

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    Wolfgang-
    Real Nihonto can not be evaluated from photographs as a hands on examination of the work is necessary. It is easier to evaluate standard military issue swords. With detailed pictures, we can at least confirm a couple of these swords are modern Chinese made.
    Even with detailed pictures, it is possible to have a an excellent forgery of a blade. I once came across a blade with a form of signature used by the smith indicating a custom made blade. It was dated early 16th century and had the correct work for the swordsmith. I made detailed rubbings of the tang and sent them to two seperate experts in Japan for their opinion. Both said the signature was correct. I bought the piece, that was quite expensive and sent it to Japan for restoration and certification. I received a response from one of the two men that the blade was a perfect 19th century copy of the man's work and signature. It was returned to me and I sent to the other sensei only to receive the same response. The blade had been made out of old Japanese steel contemporary to the swordsmith. I mention this only to demonstrate the real difficulty with judging real Nihonto without a hands on examination.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  6. #16
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    Quote by BOB COLEMAN View Post
    Wolfgang-
    Real Nihonto can not be evaluated from photographs as a hands on examination of the work is necessary. It is easier to evaluate standard military issue swords. With detailed pictures, we can at least confirm a couple of these swords are modern Chinese made.
    Even with detailed pictures, it is possible to have a an excellent forgery of a blade. I once came across a blade with a form of signature used by the smith indicating a custom made blade. It was dated early 16th century and had the correct work for the swordsmith. I made detailed rubbings of the tang and sent them to two seperate experts in Japan for their opinion. Both said the signature was correct. I bought the piece, that was quite expensive and sent it to Japan for restoration and certification. I received a response from one of the two men that the blade was a perfect 19th century copy of the man's work and signature. It was returned to me and I sent to the other sensei only to receive the same response. The blade had been made out of old Japanese steel contemporary to the swordsmith. I mention this only to demonstrate the real difficulty with judging real Nihonto without a hands on examination.
    This.

    Seems faking swords is both a global business and one that echoes through time.

    The 'Vlfberth' swords to sought after by the Vikings were also faked in their own time.

    Bummer to believe you'd bought a genuine 'Vlfberth' only to have it shatter in your hands during first contact with the steel of the enemy.

  7. #17

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    Quote by Scout View Post
    This.

    Seems faking swords is both a global business and one that echoes through time.

    The 'Vlfberth' swords to sought after by the Vikings were also faked in their own time.

    Bummer to believe you'd bought a genuine 'Vlfberth' only to have it shatter in your hands during first contact with the steel of the enemy.
    At least, you would not likely have a long time to think about being defrauded!
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  8. #18
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    Quote by BOB COLEMAN View Post
    At least, you would not likely have a long time to think about being defrauded!
    True.
    The short burst of disappointment might very suddenly have been replaced by oblivion.

    NOVA | Secrets of the Viking Sword

    http://jenny-rita.org/Annestamanus.pdf

  9. #19
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    [QUOTE= ...
    By the way, could you please suggest the acceptable price for the 98 sword, which is shown in the first image? ... Wolfgang[/QUOTE]

    I am viewing the photos on an iPad so the order may be different than on a computer screen. For the sword shown here, if an authentic Showato and in good condition, I'd suggest something in the area of 1500-1600 USD as a starting point and if it includes what appears to be a Company Grade Army Officer tassel. Values do differ though based on availability in different location around the world.

    I should mention that on extremely rare occasions a Yasukunito will surface or perhaps an ancestral blade in gunto mounts. That would, of course, change the value of the sword considerably and require an in hand examination as Bob has mentioned.

    Regards,
    Stu
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  10. #20

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    Hello Stu,

    Many thanks for your information!

    Yes, I asked the seller to offer me more close-up photos with clear details.
    But up to now, I have not received any reply from him.
    I will upload all the photos right after I receive them.

    One of my friends knows the seller quite well and they are neighbors.
    I will ask my friend to double check whether that one is a genuine sword or not, "privately with his neighbor".

    At the same time, I have bought the book named as "Samurai Sword: A Handbook, John M. Yumoto".
    I was told that the book will arrive at my office today or tomorrow.
    I am looking forward to learning the basic knowledge to start my collection of IJA swords.

    Yes of course, I really appreciate the kind & professional support from you and all other gents from the forum.
    Many thanks to all!

    And a Happy New Year!

    Greetings from Beijing!

    Best regards,

    Wolfgang

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