Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27

edo tsuba demon;s

Article about: hi i am new to this and am looking at my first tsuba that i quit like . they are asking \\$350 so any input would be a great help . sorry just seen this is ww2

  1. #11

    Default

    Quote by ghp95134 View Post
    Your comment might also apply to Bob ... well, maybe he's not been at it THAT long!

    --Guy
    Guy-
    That gave me an audible chuckle that was needed on a gray, depressing day. The other source must be pushing 90 as he has been at it since the year I was born!
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  2. #12

    Default

    Quote by BOB COLEMAN View Post
    Guy-
    That gave me an audible chuckle that was needed on a gray, depressing day. The other source must be pushing 90 as he has been at it since the year I was born!
    I think I started as most have with some interest in some form of weapons. Mine was: KNIGHTS IN ARMOR. Since at age 15 (1945) I could not find or afford European arms and armor, I switched to buying tsuba for $1.00 and Japanese armor for $3.00 to $30.00. What came out of all this was my "first" collection. By 1960 I had been a collector for almost fifteen years and had amassed about 500 tsuba and other fittings. After I returned from my years study with Dr. Kazutaro Torigoye, in 1960, I realized that at least 300 of the tsuba that I had collected over these fifteen years would have to go. They were just not good enough for the type of collection I was now going to form. Because of my "new" knowledge of fittings, and trained by the greatest master of his day, I wished now to have a pure "Japanese" style collection. One of everything that was in the Furukawa Collection book. So for the next few years I collected only those pieces that were classic to a great collection in Japan. By 1970 I had done such a good job of this style of collecting that when Dr. Junji Homma saw the collection on display he said to me, "Haynes-san, these tsuba are equal to a fine display of tsuba in Tokyo today". Well I had my "ONE OF EVERYTHING" collection, and I was very proud of it. By 1972 I realized that this was not "MY" collection, in reality, but what I was supposed to collect by Japanese standards, not my own taste or preference. Oh, there were many pieces in this "second" collection that I liked very much and out of the 700, or so pieces, there are about a dozen I still wish I had today. For the most part when I sold them in the early seventies, I do not regret it now. Most are published in one book or catalog or another and many of my friends who now own various pieces seem to value them far more than I did when I owned them. Perhaps that is because they came so easily to me.

  3. #13

    Default

    You are quoting my old friend Bob Haynes. Bob is recognized world wide as an expert on Japanese sword fittings. He was used as the consultant on all important Japanese sword fittings auctions conducted by Christies, Southebys and Butterfield and Butterfield. He had an amazing collection which he eventually auctioned off. He is a great scholar who I was fortunate enough to know and learn from.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  4. #14

    Default

    Quote by BOB COLEMAN View Post
    You are quoting my old friend Bob Haynes. Bob is recognized world wide as an expert on Japanese sword fittings. He was used as the consultant on all important Japanese sword fittings auctions conducted by Christies, Southebys and Butterfield and Butterfield. He had an amazing collection which he eventually auctioned off. He is a great scholar who I was fortunate enough to know and learn from.
    yes after reading what you said i came across him ,, hearing that from you i must be on the right path

  5. #15

    Default

    heres one more that i have been offerd
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

Name:	307224612.jpg 
Views:	18 
Size:	66.0 KB 
ID:	676171  

  6. #16

    Default

    Quote by hawkins View Post
    heres one more that i have been offerd
    All depends on the price. It is an honest Late Edo tsuba of lower medium quality.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  7. #17

    Default

    (
    Quote by BOB COLEMAN View Post
    All depends on the price. It is an honest Late Edo tsuba of lower medium quality.
    thanks Bob $300 nz so $270 usa , i know people dont like to talk price at times but i feel its part of the process as you have proven and saved me $$. All so i have been looking at a few that are nbthk (certificate ) is this a better way to go , these are in japan them selfs ,
    the more i read the more i feel out of my depth but would be nice to own a few nice real ones ,

    i did not realize there were so many makers schools and then copes of makers and so on

    just starting out and gone mad

  8. #18

    Default

    this is another i am looking at for a first , credit to(Bob Haynes) little higher in price but to my untrained eye its lovely looking




    Oval iron plate tsuba with sukashi design of a summer half rolled curtain with tie cords and aoi leaves and stems at the top. With gold nunome half kiku blooms over the surface on both sides.

    This type of late, ca. 1800, tsuba is very hard to classify, it would seem to have much of the style of the Sunagawa school of this same period, but it might be independant work made in Edo. In any event it is very well made and shows great skill in carving and inlay." (Haynes)
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

Name:	21.jpg 
Views:	43 
Size:	211.7 KB 
ID:	676279  

  9. #19

    Default

    Compare the work of #2 with #3. The third tsuba is much better than the previous one. Collecting tsuba is an aesthetic thing. Educate yourself and then buy what you like. My personal taste goes to iron tsukashi tsuba of the early Edo period. I love the color of the iron and the fine chisel work. When ever selling tsuba, you will have more luck with very good to excellent quality guards than accumulating low end material. I used to always define tsuba as a metal sword guard that is expensive to buy and impossible to sell.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  10. #20
    ?

    Default

    Very interesting thread, thanks i'm enjoying the read!

    Here's a picture of the one i mentioned earlier, i bought it only because it appealed to me and i hoped to use it one day on a blade i have. I haven't seen any other pieces yet to go with it so it just lives on display.
    It is as i understand Raiden the god of thunder.
    Bob, i would appreciate your comments on the piece.
    Thanks in advance
    ErnClick image for larger version. 

Name:	aaP4140329.jpg 
Views:	103 
Size:	195.4 KB 
ID:	676310

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Signed Tsuba With Butterflies

    In Japanese Militaria
    06-15-2013, 07:34 PM
  2. Info on tsuba and posters

    In Japanese Militaria
    10-14-2011, 01:53 AM
  3. Transalate text on old tsuba

    In Japanese Militaria
    02-22-2010, 01:49 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •