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A free Japanese sword...

Article about: The cherry blossom WAS a reverse threaded screw! The sword is apart and there ARE markings! VICTORY!! Stand-by for photos!

  1. #51

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    The cherry blossom WAS a reverse threaded screw!

    The sword is apart and there ARE markings! VICTORY!!

    Stand-by for photos!

  2. #52

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Marking:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    The other side of the tang appears unmarked...

  3. #53

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    Hmmmmm .... it is signed:

    兼元


    Kanemoto

    Here's a list of some swordsmiths named Kanemoto [the first 14].

    Your sword would have had a retaining pin as well, making it much more secure in a combat mode. The two OLD holes indicate it was cut down at least once when it was a bonafide "samurai" sword. Additionally, it looks like the tang screw was welded onto the butt of the tang and not that the tang was "cut down" and threaded -- one (I think!) can see the natural ending of the nakago-jiri.

    I have no indication of values, because that is not my field. Hopefully Stu or others can help.

    --Guy

    p.s. I just noticed MORE Kanemotos on the previous page on the link I supplied. 25 more. Starting with KAN1557 .

  4. #54

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    Thank you so much for the help, Guy! Would it be possible to determine when the blade was made... or too many Kanemoto's to know for sure?

    I would like to know the value of this sword if someone could help!

  5. #55

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    I've just noticed [being as brilliant as I am!] that the "belly" portion of your tang was shaved down as well, giving it a noticeable concave curve.

    As far as swordsmiths ... we can probably rule out the four who were active in the 1900s; just looking at the rust I would guess around 1850s or so. Again ... I am NOT qualified to judge blades. I can't really see how dark the rust, and even then, I couldn't tell. The general base rule is "the darker the rust, the older the sword."

    Let's wait for Stu and the others who have studied swords and get their better informed opinion. I knew Paul Martin when he was in the SF Bay area last year; he presented a sword appreciation lecture my dojo, then later at San Jose State University. Too bad he's not here now. He's a Brit who lives in Japan and is a qualified judge [recently took high honors in the Sword Preservation Society contest]. I would trust his judgement; alas .....

  6. #56

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    Thank you so much, Guy. I am in your debt!

    Unfortunately, I am taking photos inside with my phone... plus the harsh fluorescent lighting isn't the best...

    I'll be sure to post better quality photos as soon as possible!

  7. #57

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    The Kanemoto school of swordsmiths worked in Mino Province, the area around Seki City which was the source of the majority of WW2 factory and hand made blades. The Kanemoto were known for the sanbonsuji temper line(three cedars). They would have two smaller and then one large pointed line in the temper resembling three cedar trees. The lineage of the Kanemoto line starts in the mid 15th century and continued through the WW2 period. I believe there is a current smith still forging swords from this lineage. Judgement of age from the tang patina is difficult from photos. The forging and type of steel utilized is also a factor in dating a blade.. Then we have the question is the signature valid or fake. Some of the evidence has been destroyed with the reshaping of the nakago. From your pictures, the blade is likely 17th century. The best of the Kanemoto were the first three generations. They would never have butchered a blade by one of these men like this. Final judgement, which is the case with 99% of old hand forged blades requires a hands on examination.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  8. #58

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    Giz,

    What is the straight-line distance from tip to the notch at the habaki? This is how Japanese swords are measured.

    Borrowed from Richard Stein.

    Yours looks very beefy:


    Something I would want in a combat situation.

    Cheers!
    --Guy

  9. #59

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    So... my sword could have been made in the 1600s?! Cut down to military standards for the Russo-Japanese War and potentially brought back by a WW2 PTO vet?

  10. #60

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    Quote by ghp95134 View Post
    Giz,

    What is the straight-line distance from tip to the notch at the habaki? This is how Japanese swords are measured.

    Borrowed from Richard Stein.

    Yours looks very beefy:


    Something I would want in a combat situation.

    Cheers!
    --Guy
    Not counting the tang, the sword is roughly 19.5 inches long ... (using a cheap plastic ruler)

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