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A free Japanese sword...

Article about: The cherry blossom WAS a reverse threaded screw! The sword is apart and there ARE markings! VICTORY!! Stand-by for photos!

  1. #61

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    Hi Joe-
    This form of mounting was still being carried during the Japanese campaign in China. Please remember that the dating I gave is an educated guess based upon pictures, which is not the best way to appraise a blade. The modification to the tang of this sword will greatly impact the value of the piece. It is what it is. My first experience with one of these threaded tangs came back in the mid 1970's when I bought a collection of nine swords from a vet. I was very confused when I removed the handle of a shingunto mounting(WW2 era)to find the threaded tang. In all of the swords I have owned over the years, I have only owned three with this nakago modification.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  2. #62

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    Quote by BOB COLEMAN View Post
    ...The Kanemoto were known for the sanbonsuji temper line(three cedars). ...
    Bob, that was a very educational post. Here is Giz's sanbonsugi; does it tell you anything?


    Not three sharp trees ^^^; only the middle "cedar" is sharp, more like this: ∩^∩

    I'll bet it would polish up nicely if one had about $5k or whatever the rate is today [of course, not National Treasure class polishing].

    --Guy

  3. #63

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    It is typical of the hamon found on blades from the later generations. The early generations had a larger, more robust and crisp sanbonsuji. Due to the nakago alteration and also the fact that the blade is now a wakizashi length, the blade would not be worth investing in polish and shirasaya.
    This is likely a valid signature. It strongly resembles one I had on a katana many years ago. That piece was judged to be mid 17th centruy.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  4. #64

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    Did you include the habaki [collar]? If so, you can subtract about another inch [from point to back-notch only]; so, approximately 18" long. That length is roughly 1-shaku 6-sun? Pretty short -- even if it were 24". The sword my teacher used when he was teaching army sword techniques in the 1930-40s was 2 shaku 2-sun 6-bu (about 26") and he was only 5'1" tall.

    --Guy

  5. #65

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    BUT IT WAS FREEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEe

    What a great gift!

    --Guy

  6. #66

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    Thank you so much, Bob and Guy! I have A LOT to learn, but you gents have provided me with a wealth of info and also key words that will help me learn more about this piece of history.

    Bob, could you provide a ballpark value? The age of the blade has me thrilled... but I am having trouble catching the vibe of how desirable this sword is based on your responses.

  7. #67
    ?

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    Well Joe you certainly didnt disappoint us with this one, certainly an out of the norm and a terrific addition to your japanese collection ,also fascinating info from our forum members and educational to boot, congrats

  8. #68

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    Quote by ghp95134 View Post
    Did you include the habaki [collar]? If so, you can subtract about another inch [from point to back-notch only]; so, approximately 18" long. That length is roughly 1-shaku 6-sun? Pretty short -- even if it were 24". The sword my teacher used when he was teaching army sword techniques in the 1930-40s was 2 shaku 2-sun 6-bu (about 26") and he was only 5'1" tall.

    --Guy
    I did not count the collar. Keep in mind I used a cheapo plastic ruler...

  9. #69

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    Hi Joe-
    I really am not comfortable evaluationg a blade from photographs. There are too many things like workmanship, flaws and defects to judge in a sword for value just from pictures.
    As to the length of the blade, that can reflect the owner's height. It can also indicate the form of fencing that he studied. Different schools of swordmanship reflected different lengths of blade. The famous Yagyu school for instance favored shorter blades as they favored a quick draw technique. The masters of the Yagyu school made the mistake of challenging the famous samurai Miyamoto Musashi out for a duel and he killed all three. For revenge, some of their students ambushed Musashi for revenge and he killed all of them also.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  10. #70

    Default Re: A free Japanese sword...

    Quote by GIZMO8Z View Post
    I did not count the collar. Keep in mind I used a cheapo plastic ruler...
    Close enough for government work.*

    --Guy



    *I'm authorized to say that since I've been with the military & federal government since 1973

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