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Help needed with two japanese bring-backs

Article about: Here are two recent flea market finds. I paid for both. The little old lady who sold them to me said that her father brought them back from Guadalcanal. Can someone kindly translate the top

  1. #1

    Default Help needed with two japanese bring-backs

    Here are two recent flea market finds. The little old lady who sold them to me said that her father brought them back from Guadalcanal. Can someone kindly translate the top line on the Hinomaru Yosegaki? Also, is it odd that the writing is, for the most part, vertical. I read somewhere that the writing usually extends outward from the sun disk. Your help would also be much appreciated if you would translate what is written inside the wreath on the handkerchief. I assume that it is from World War II, but it looks old enough to come from the Russo-Japanese War. Any thoughts that you might have about these two objects will be most welcome.
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    Last edited by Uncle Paul; 03-08-2016 at 09:13 PM. Reason: forgot a word

  2. #2

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    First one is a Christmas 1945 gift to a GI [correction: dated to 2 December 1945 at lower right]; I won't go through the names. Pertinent elements:

    平和世界 Heiwa Sekai - World Peace
    日本 Nippon - Japan
    米国 Beikoku - America
    天皇陛下万歳 Tenno Heika Banzai [Long Live the Emperor]
    昭和廿年十二月廿五にち Showa 20, December 25

    To the left of the meatball:

    Showa 20, December 25th
    Showa 16 December 8th

    真珠湾 Pearl Harbor
    マジュロ Majuro
    ロイルモア Rirumoa
    エルウイタ Eruuita
    サイパン Saipan
    沖縄 Okinawa
    横浜 Yokohama
    横須賀 Yokosuka
    東京 Tokyo

    Bottom left looks like a poem?
    鵜流夢
    U-ryū yume
    Uryuu is a family name; yume means dream. This phrase is repeated 3 times.

    Edited to add:
    Bottom right
    昭和廿年十二月二日
    Shōwa nijūnen jūnigatsu futsuka
    杉浦 唐壽
    Sugiura ??

    1945, December 2nd
    Sugiura [??? can't figure out if I copied the kanji correctly for the given name]


    --Guy

  3. #3

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    Second one is a welcome souvenir

    奉迎記念
    Hōgei Kinen
    Welcome commemoration


    --Guy

  4. #4

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    The flag may not be what you were hoping for, but the Furoshiki https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furoshiki is indeed featuring the Mikasa, so it must have been celebrating the Emperor's inspection of the fleet back at the time of the Russo Japanese War.
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  5. #5

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    Quote by ghp95134 View Post
    Second one is a welcome souvenir

    奉迎記念
    Hōgei Kinen
    Welcome commemoration


    --Guy
    Guy,
    Thank you so much for taking the time and the trouble to comment on the meatball flag. It's good to know that the flag was a Xmas present in 1945 -- an entirely different conclusioin than I would have come to if I was just guessing. Thanks to members like yourself the War Relics Forum has proven to be a serious and respected scholarly resource.
    Uncle Paul

  6. #6

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    Thanks, Nick, for taking a look at the handkerchief and helping me to forn an opinion about it. It just has that "predates World II" look about it, but without the comments of members like yourself I would be totally in the dark. Is there any possibility that the silk might have been produced fto greet the Great White Fleet?
    Uncle Paul

  7. #7

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    Quote by Uncle Paul View Post
    ... It's good to know that the flag was a Xmas present in 1945
    Unka Paul,

    I must admit to being a bit confused about your yosegaki flag .... the date on the lower right corner is 2 December 1945 whereas the date on the left of the meatball is 8 December 1940 ~ 25 December 1945; then the various battles are listed from Pearl Harbor (Dec 8 on the Japanese calendar); then, the South Pacific to Tokyo. We can make surmises about the geographic locations mentioned, but they will always be just that: guesses. Maybe the recipient served in those campaigns; or perhaps the gifter was involved -- who knows.

    I'm just curious about the 2 December 1945 and 25 December 1945 dates.

    Regards,
    --Guy

  8. #8

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    What I was trying to tell you by the link I provided is that the second item was NOT a handkerchief, but used like a bag. No, it had nothing to do with a foreign fleet visiting Japan, but welcoming a very high ranking person like the emperor. This is clear by the special word used for "greeting".
    The poem-like inscription on the post war gift flag seems to indicate it was a present to a Carolyn.
    Last edited by nick komiya; 03-09-2016 at 10:50 AM.

  9. #9

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    Thanks, again Nick. Fascinating information. I would be completely in the dark without your help.

  10. #10

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    Quote by nick komiya View Post
    ...the second item was NOT a handkerchief, but used like a bag. ...
    Here's what Nick means:


    Google images:more.


    --Guy

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