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Help on type 95 NCO

Article about: This one looks like a good one to me but wanted second opions. Thanks! https://www.lakesidetrader.com/item.php?ID=6017

  1. #11

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    I have added the pics for future reference.

    Cheers, Ade.
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  2. #12
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    A good sword in great condition

  3. #13

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    Quote by Gunto View Post
    Wasnt it only Suya that made the thick tsuba?
    Anyone else see an issue with this?

    Thanks

  4. #14

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    Quote by Adrian Stevenson View Post
    I have added the pics for future reference.

    Cheers, Ade.
    Thanks Adrian

  5. #15

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    Looking for a nice NCO sword and price seems resonable.

  6. #16
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    Quote by Gunto View Post
    Wasnt it only Suya that made the thick tsuba?
    Hi Thomas,

    Nothing I've ever come across would indicate that to be the case. My understanding is the thinner tsuba came into use as a vital material saving measure as the war progressed.

    If you have information to the contrary I'd like to find out as it would be new to me and worth learning.

    Regards,
    Stu

  7. #17
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    Hi grifflvc,
    i agree with the others, it is a nice sword!
    However, it is mid war, not early war, going by the serial number range and the Arsenal stamps, -so i'm a little confused about the tsuba thickness issue??
    Ern

  8. #18
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    Hi Ern,

    There's no issue in my view. I just know that the first run aluminum tsuka brass tsuba top latch versions had the 11mm thick tsuba and the second run the 9mm. Either way I consider the brass tsuba version to be early war if you consider when the Japanese entered China well before the Allies, and later the U.S., got into WW2. I think of mid war as being 41/42 when the iron tsuba was used on the top latch and then the side latch. Late war for me begins the wooden tsuka variations of which there are several as you are aware.

    For me the question I posed was just one of curiosity.

    If you see these time lines differently let me know. I'm aware you have an interest in NCO swords, as I have, and I'm always interested in additional information.

    Regards,
    Stu

  9. #19
    Rod
    Rod is offline
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    Quote by stegel View Post
    Hi grifflvc,
    i agree with the others, it is a nice sword!
    However, it is mid war, not early war, going by the serial number range and the Arsenal stamps, -so i'm a little confused about the tsuba thickness issue??
    Ern
    Hi Ern,

    Copied and pasted (I hope that's ok) from Stu's article pinned to the top of this forum...

    Quote "Authorized for production in 1935 and into production in 1937, they first appeared with copper tsuka (handle) and thick (11 mm) brass tsuba (hand guard). These early models are scarce, quite desirable and I'm sorry to say I can't show you a photo of my own as I don't have one. Hopefully I'll be able to rectify that situation in time. ***Next in the line of development was a version with an aluminium tsuka and thick (11 mm) brass tsuba. ***That was followed by a model with aluminium tsuka and thinner (9 mm) brass tsuba and eventually, in mid 1941, an aluminium tsuka and iron tsuba. Late war versions of the Type 95 can be found with wooden tsuka and are poorly constructed in comparison to those that preceded them in the development line."

    So an aluminum handle and iron tsuba by the time of the attack on Pearl Harbour. I have an earlier one (of the same type) if the serial numbers are consecutive with different maker marks and a 9mm thick tsuba but this type was only made between 1937 and 1941.

    I hope that helps.

    Regards, Rod

  10. #20
    Rod
    Rod is offline
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    Hi Stu,

    Now you know how long it takes me to compose a post. Good to hear it firsthand!

    Regards, Rod

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