Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 36

interesting photo

Article about: I wanted to share this photo I recently acquired. I hope you find it interesting.

  1. #1

    Default interesting photo

    I wanted to share this photo I recently acquired. I hope you find it interesting.
    Attached Images Attached Images interesting photo 

  2. #2

    Default

    Anything written on the reverse?

    --Guy

  3. #3

    Default

    No. I wish.

  4. #4
    MAP
    MAP is online now
    ?

    Default

    wish I could expand it. Can you upload a larger size? Can't see much. An Indian and Japanese soldier?
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  5. #5
    ?

    Default

    Looks like a British Sikhs solider with a Japanese solider(Good eye Michael)
    Could this be a post war pic or a POW?

    Semper Fi
    Phil

  6. #6

    Default

    Nice one,

    I am now not at home. I have other ones but maybe this one could help a little further.

    Rinteresting photointeresting photoegards
    Delibes

  7. #7
    ?

    Default

    Now that one is interesting. The Sikhs is sporting a holstered pistol and handcuffs/wrist breaker and the Japanese soldier has his sword.
    I'm looking forward to the translation of what is written on the back.

    Semper fi
    Phil

  8. #8
    MAP
    MAP is online now
    ?

    Default

    Quote by AZPhil View Post
    Now that one is interesting. The Sikhs is sporting a holstered pistol and handcuffs/wrist breaker and the Japanese soldier has his sword.
    I'm looking forward to the translation of what is written on the back.

    Semper fi
    Phil
    IMHO, the most possible location being HK or Singapore

    My knowledge of the history in this era for these locations is limited but I think they did have a large Indian minority. Maybe a Sikh police officer in "occupied" Singapore? Just a guess on my part
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote by delibes View Post
    I am now not at home. I have other ones but maybe this one could help a little further.
    Dunno if it really helps .... the original photo shows palm-like trees, yours is in Manchuria. (^_^)

    満州にて
    Manshū nite
    In Manchuria

    斉藤哲三郎氏

    Saitō Tetsuzaburo-shi
    Mr. Saito Tetsuzaburo
    ~shi is another form of "Mr." It is used only in written form and not spoken; ranks lower than san, but above kun.
    =====
    From Japanese Wiki regarding honorific speech.

    Sama [Mr., Ms.]
    Used to respect the other party. It is used both verbally and in writing, and it is a title with little discomfort when used in any scene.
    In the mass media, it is often used as the highest title for the imperial family (even if the target is a young child). Is required by each company's internal regulations. Individuals and organizations advocating the abolition of the Emperor System, including the Communist Party of Japan, avoid this title as “the one that gives people a grade of nobility”, and in related papers such as “Shinbu Red Flag”, they are written without a title, e.g., "Prime Minister Abe." When a national organization including the emperor or imperial officially refers to the imperial family, the honorary title of His Majesty or His Highness shall be used in accordance with Article 23 of the Imperial Code.

    The name tag of a patient in a hospital often uses 殿 “dono” instead of “sama” (but “san” when calling or talking to the patient).

    殿 Dono [Lord]
    When used in professional communication and public matters (office communication and official documents), “Sama” may change to “Dono”. Dono is used in written language. In conversation, the person who says “dono” is responded to as “sama” in the conversation.
    It may be used after the job title (eg, General Manager). Recently, the title of postal items sent to individuals from government offices has been changed from “Tono” to “Sama”. In documents from citizens to government offices (chiefs etc.), it is still used from the viewpoint of “public service is a public employee” (it is written on the form of the application form / notification form from the beginning), but “(destination).

    さん San [Mr., Ms.]
    The most common title. A title that can be used both verbally and in writing, with little discomfort when used in any situation. Also attach to opponents who have a certain distance or who can't measure their relationship with them for the first time.
    Suffix for general relative names. “Father” “Mother” “Brother” “Sister” “Grandfather” “Grandmother” “Uncle” “Aunt” etc.
    It is also common to use it after the job title or job title. “President”, “Store Manager”, “Tourist”, “Caddy” etc.
    It is also common to add the name of the store. “Clothing shop”, “Ramen shop”, “Toy shop”, etc. At business sites, it is often added to the organization name of the other party, such as “XX Trading”.
    Sometimes attached to a creature's type name. "Cat", "Elephant", etc.

    Shi [Mr.]
    Shi is generally not used in spoken language, but used in a modified scene such as written language or reports and reports. It was mainly used for men, but now it is often used for women.

    Kun [You; Mr.]
    Kun is the same as “san” and is to be added after the name. It is often used for peers, but it may also be used for close friends. It is often used for men, but it is also used for women when a boss calls his subordinate. It may also be used for those who are familiar with the person addressed.
    Originally, Shoin Yoshida began to use it as a unified title so that discussions could be held at an equal position at Matsushita Village School.
    In the House of Councilors, according to the House of Councilors Proceedings, “Members use '君 kun' as honorifics in the hall or committee room”. In the House of Representatives, the House of Representatives manual also states that “Members must use each other's titles.”
    Based on the idea that only Keio University's founder, Yukichi Fukuzawa, is called "先生 sensei", the faculty and staff members are described as “[surname]-kun” in Keio University documents and notices.

  10. #10
    ?

    Default

    I have always found this one funny. Shanghai, pre NLF landing. The Japanese NLF officer semi-standing while apparently seated to match the height, or be taller than, the Sikh policeman.
    interesting photo

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Interesting Photo

    In Japanese Militaria
    04-23-2019, 08:00 AM
  2. Interesting Photo

    In Doc's, paper items, photos, propaganda
    02-08-2016, 09:09 PM
  3. just an interesting photo

    In Photos - Papers - Propaganda of the Third Reich
    10-08-2015, 02:59 PM
  4. Just an interesting photo.......

    In Photos - Papers - Propaganda of the Third Reich
    02-06-2013, 02:36 AM
  5. interesting photo's

    In German photographs & Postcards
    08-25-2009, 09:49 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •