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Japanese sword help

Article about: by asterperious Nihonto are a realm unto themselves. Without holding it hard to say much about it, I have years of association with them but have yet to own one. This blade looks good, the f

  1. #11

    Default Re: Japanese sword help

    A nice genuine samurai sword and not a Chinese copy for a change. It is impossible to date the blade accurately from images when it is unsigned. It would take an in hand examination by a trained appraiser. The mounting is
    19th century but the blade is older as the three holes indicate three seperate mountings. When making a remount, more care would have been made for a signed quality blade to not punch extra holes in the nakago. The blade is definitely Edo period(post 1600)and likely late 17th century. As there was a long period of peace during the Edo period, sword making fell off and few were made during the 18th century.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  2. #12

    Default Re: Japanese sword help

    On another point mentioned on this thread, genine Japanese swords will definitely have a grain in the steel which is caused by the folding and laminating of the blade. It is far more subtle than the enhanced acid etched Chinese fakes. There are different types of grain which is causd by different methods of construction. Prior to the Edo period, this was an excellent feature to help identify the school of swordsmithing of a blade.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  3. #13

    Default Re: Japanese sword help

    Thanks very much Al and Bob a great help indeed, once again thats why this forum is brilliant and helps us thicko's out
    could anyone put a value on it please as i am trying to raise cash for another dagger and this is not my line of collecting,
    thanks again, Ronnie

  4. #14

    Default Re: Japanese sword help

    looks great to me mate rgds Dave

  5. #15

    Default Re: Japanese sword help

    Congrats on getting this one Ronnie!
    Too bad you are letting it go. No real blade collection is complete without a real Japanese sword in it.
    Ralph.
    Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stamm. Kp. Pz. Erz. Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

  6. #16

    Default Re: Japanese sword help

    Quote by rbminis View Post
    Congrats on getting this one Ronnie!
    Too bad you are letting it go. No real blade collection is complete without a real Japanese sword in it.
    Ralph.
    Ha ha you swine Ralph dont tempt me to keep it, breaks my heart to let any of my blades go
    cheers for the repl's aswell guys

  7. #17

    Default Re: Japanese sword help

    Quote by 85ronnies View Post
    Ha ha you swine Ralph dont tempt me to keep it, breaks my heart to let any of my blades go
    cheers for the repl's aswell guys
    Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stamm. Kp. Pz. Erz. Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

  8. #18

    Default Re: Japanese sword help

    Evaluating a Japanese sword can only be done with a hands on examination. Each piece is a distinct hand made item which has to be evaluated on it's own merits. I can tell you that the blade was likely part of a contract order or had a flaw in it's construction. Japanese lords would place a stock order for blades and a swordsmith would turn them out enmasse and not sign them. If a blade had a flaw, the swordsmith also would not sign it He would either destroy the blade or give it to one of his assistants to sell if the flaw was not too great.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  9. #19

    Default Re: Japanese sword help

    Quote by BOB COLEMAN View Post
    Evaluating a Japanese sword can only be done with a hands on examination. Each piece is a distinct hand made item which has to be evaluated on it's own merits. I can tell you that the blade was likely part of a contract order or had a flaw in it's construction. Japanese lords would place a stock order for blades and a swordsmith would turn them out enmasse and not sign them. If a blade had a flaw, the swordsmith also would not sign it He would either destroy the blade or give it to one of his assistants to sell if the flaw was not too great.
    Interesting information Bob, I had not heard that before. Thanks for posting this.
    Ralph.
    Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stamm. Kp. Pz. Erz. Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

  10. #20

    Default Re: Japanese sword help

    Nihonto are a realm unto themselves. Without holding it hard to say much about it, I have years of association with them but have yet to own one. This blade looks good, the furniture is all relatively modern junk and assembled to dress out the blade, likely an occupation era souvenir piece built up around a good older generic aresenal
    blade.

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