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Japanese Sword Katana Id Needed Interesting piece

Article about: Hi, I just acquired this Vet bring back Japanese sword. But I do Not know anything about it! Can you guys tell me about this sword? (Age, Possible value, hand made? Etc) It is in Excellent C

  1. #11

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    Seems to be a good last war sword. Good find. Marty

  2. #12

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    Quote by Wblastoff View Post
    Understood
    Thanks!
    Stick around. This place is very educational. What you read here is very accurate. It is not a lot of hot air as found at other places.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  3. #13

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    I wanted to share the story of this sword...

    United States Marine Staff Sergeant Morris witnessed the signing of unconditional surrender of the Imperial Japanese North China Army in Tianjin China 1945 photographed it, and got a souvenir sword to take home.

    The story as It was told and written down by me...


    The sun shined brightly on a cool breezy autumn day in the city of Tianjin China, 1945.
    Fifty to sixty degrees was common and very much like fall in the East Coast of the United States; with the colors of amber and gold reflecting from the trees and dancing on the street.
    Hastily an old Northern Elm table was brought from inside the municipal building and placed in the middle of the street as Jeeps full of MPís in their dress uniforms began to arrive. A Marine Corporal prepared ink and placed a multi page document on the table. This document placed on the table was the unconditional surrender of the Imperial Japanese North China Army;
    to be signed by the Japanese Lieutenant General, commander of the Japanese North China Army. It was not long before the French Military Delegation arrived. There was a very old general who walked with a limp probably as a result of the many years spent carrying all of the medals on his chest most definitely a young soldier of the previous war. An orderly flanked him and a French Captain both friendly faced and very diplomatic in appearance and manor. The Chinese military and diplomats arrived and we began to talk with them, as we had known them for quite some time. A good friend of mine came up shook my hand, and smiled and said see me when this is over I have something for you. Higher ranks of Marines started to buzz out of the building like bees circling honey. Everyone seemed to swarm around the wooden desk. It all started to come together like some great orchestra that the MP's were conducting unseen in the distance. In a moment there was silence and the face of our weathered commander appeared. Things started happening fast. Once again we were Marines standing at attention assessing our surroundings and acting accordingly. From the West a group of 7 Japanese Officers marched down the street towards the table. You could have heard a pin drop. In moments that seemed like hours these Soldiers tried to show dignity in their situation. Sullen faces, eyes glazed, incoherent men on their way to death like so many of my brother marines before the morphine kicked in and they cried for mother. They marched from the west, no more from the east. The land of the Rising Sun was setting in China and it was ok with me. As the Japanese General was shown a chair and sat in it he was handed a pen. He looked up and around like a turtle emerging from its shell. I could see the consternation on his face and for a brief moment I pitied him. I pitied him for what would happen to him and his troops. This was China and the Chinese hated the Japs more than us.
    My pity lasted only for a moment as I thought of my time in the Pacific and all the friends who where once and now where no more. I thought of my wife, I thought of home. The General stood, rattling off some Japanese and his officers became erect and saluted for the first time. Before our commanderís hand reached his brow every Marineís hand was raised in salute. I know in our hearts not one of us was saluting those men, the enemy. We Marines where saluting all of our fallen brethren. I could see it in the face of every Marine.
    Then it was over and my buddy walked to me and handed me the sword and said it was from an officer. The sword sits in the attic wrapped and I donít talk about it much.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	626288   Click image for larger version. 

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  4. #14

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    I wanted to share the story...
    United States Marine Staff Sergeant Morris witnessed the signing of unconditional surrender of the Imperial Japanese North China Army in Tianjin China 1945 photographed it, and got a souvenir sword to take home.

    The story as It was told and written down by me...


    The sun shined brightly on a cool breezy autumn day in the city of Tianjin China, 1945.
    Fifty to sixty degrees was common and very much like fall in the East Coast of the United States; with the colors of amber and gold reflecting from the trees and dancing on the street.
    Hastily an old Northern Elm table was brought from inside the municipal building and placed in the middle of the street as Jeeps full of MPís in their dress uniforms began to arrive. A Marine Corporal prepared ink and placed a multi page document on the table. This document placed on the table was the unconditional surrender of the Imperial Japanese North China Army;
    to be signed by the Japanese Lieutenant General, commander of the Japanese North China Army. It was not long before the French Military Delegation arrived. There was a very old general who walked with a limp probably as a result of the many years spent carrying all of the medals on his chest most definitely a young soldier of the previous war. An orderly flanked him and a French Captain both friendly faced and very diplomatic in appearance and manor. The Chinese military and diplomats arrived and we began to talk with them, as we had known them for quite some time. A good friend of mine came up shook my hand, and smiled and said see me when this is over I have something for you. Higher ranks of Marines started to buzz out of the building like bees circling honey. Everyone seemed to swarm around the wooden desk. It all started to come together like some great orchestra that the MP's were conducting unseen in the distance. In a moment there was silence and the face of our weathered commander appeared. Things started happening fast. Once again we were Marines standing at attention assessing our surroundings and acting accordingly. From the West a group of 7 Japanese Officers marched down the street towards the table. You could have heard a pin drop. In moments that seemed like hours these Soldiers tried to show dignity in their situation. Sullen faces, eyes glazed, incoherent men on their way to death like so many of my brother marines before the morphine kicked in and they cried for mother. They marched from the west, no more from the east. The land of the Rising Sun was setting in China and it was ok with me. As the Japanese General was shown a chair and sat in it he was handed a pen. He looked up and around like a turtle emerging from its shell. I could see the consternation on his face and for a brief moment I pitied him. I pitied him for what would happen to him and his troops. This was China and the Chinese hated the Japs more than us.
    My pity lasted only for a moment as I thought of my time in the Pacific and all the friends who where once and now where no more. I thought of my wife, I thought of home. The General stood, rattling off some Japanese and his officers became erect and saluted for the first time. Before our commanderís hand reached his brow every Marineís hand was raised in salute. I know in our hearts not one of us was saluting those men, the enemy. We Marines where saluting all of our fallen brethren. I could see it in the face of every Marine.
    Then it was over and my buddy walked to me and handed me the sword and said it was from an officer. The sword sits in the attic wrapped and I donít talk about it much.

    United States Marine Staff Sergeant Morris had a heart attack an died before he hit the floor in 2010 at the age of 97.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

Name:	pictures2b.jpg 
Views:	21 
Size:	64.4 KB 
ID:	626290   Click image for larger version. 

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Views:	17 
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ID:	626291  


  5. #15

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    Great historical addition to this thread. Thanks for sharing the information and photos.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

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