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Private Collection Museum

Article about: Greetings all! I hope everyone is set for an awesome Christmas. I transferred jobs last June and am now in Texarkana. This past weekend, my wife and I visited a nearby town loaded with histo

  1. #11

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    Quote by swbeck55 View Post
    Would this be the correct person? http://www.japaneseswordindex.com/oshigata/kanemas2.jpg, I was unable to find any Masakane (Masakhane). I know you had told me some time ago about the poor record keeping the sword smiths maintained, was it the same with the sword makers as well? Was there a certain amount of training required then to make the swords? (certification).
    The mei you gave the link to is cut by an entirely different individual who is used to cutting a signature in to steel with hammer and chisel. As guy mentioned, the niji mei is very poorly cut.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  2. #12
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    Quote by Gwar View Post
    Regardless ... Please stress the proper way to put these delicate items in the holder.... G

    G-man I'm glad I'm not the only one who puckered on that.

    OP Please pass Gwar's words along to the museum keeper. Rest the swords on their Mune. (Back/spine)
    NEVER ON THE EDGE!

    Semper Fi
    Phil

  3. #13

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    Quote by AZPhil View Post

    G-man I'm glad I'm not the only one who puckered on that.

    OP Please pass Gwar's words along to the museum keeper. Rest the swords on their Mune. (Back/spine)
    NEVER ON THE EDGE!

    Semper Fi
    Phil

    Phil .... I've seen tachi blades on display in Japanese museums and .... they were resting on their edges, in the "tachi" position. I found this image online to support my memory! The blogger states this is
    太刀 菊御作(伝後鳥羽上皇)
    Tachi; [made by] Saku-go-Saku (Retired Emperor Gotoba).

    She has more photos HERE

    If you google-image search "japan sword museum" you'll see other images (though few seem to be from the JSM).


    --Guy
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

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  4. #14

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    Quote by ghp95134 View Post
    Phil .... I've seen tachi blades on display in Japanese museums and .... they were resting on their edges, in the "tachi" position. I found this image online to support my memory! The blogger states this is
    太刀 菊御作(伝後鳥羽上皇)
    Tachi; [made by] Saku-go-Saku (Retired Emperor Gotoba).

    She has more photos HERE

    If you google-image search "japan sword museum" you'll see other images (though few seem to be from the JSM).


    --Guy
    I concur with Guy.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  5. #15

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    Quote by BOB COLEMAN View Post
    I concur with Guy.
    The only caveat, and I think Bob would agree, is that the museum display will have a pad below the sheet so that the cutting edge is not directly against a hard object.

    Still, orientation for tachi is edge-down.

    --Guy

  6. #16
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    HMMMM. I greatly respect your Gents vast knowledge and experience with these. I'm just a student in learning and everybody who I have had contact/conversations with about this subject always stressed never on the edge and never finger **** the blades.
    I'm kind of left not knowing what to say.

    Semper Fi
    Phil

  7. #17

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    Quote by AZPhil View Post
    HMMMM. I greatly respect your Gents vast knowledge and experience with these. I'm just a student in learning and everybody who I have had contact/conversations with about this subject always stressed never on the edge and never finger **** the blades.
    I'm kind of left not knowing what to say.

    Semper Fi
    Phil
    Phil-
    You simply received incorrect information from an individual who did not know what he was talking about. In all fields of collecting, this is not uncommon. Merry Christmas to you. It is always a good thing to learn something new that is factual. Edo period katana of the Hizen smiths and the Kunikiyo of Kyoto all signed their katana tachi mei and are usually displayed with the ha down.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  8. #18

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    I cannot thank you all enough. I gave the curator the link to this page so hopefully he has everything he needs to make his display unique, interesting AND educational. Bob and Guy, you are top shelf individuals as always and have my deepest gratitude. Merry Christmas to all and I hope you all have an amazing and prosperous New Year!

  9. #19

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    Quote by ghp95134 View Post
    Faulty information corrected. If you read this earlier, I've changed it again!!!

    Sword #1: Navy stainless steel "Takayama Sword"

    高山刀正兼之作
    Takayama-to Masakane Kore [wo] Saku
    Takayama Sword, Masakane Made This

    八七
    87
    Assembly number in lacquered paint

    I've explained a similar Takayama Sword on WAF.

    ==============

    Sword #2:
    兼正
    Kanemasa
    [sounds like Kahnay-Masa]
    This was crudely chisled -- I doubt it was done by the smith .....


    --Guy
    高山刀正廣之作(服部正廣 Isobe Masahiro)This Takayama Sword made By Masahiro

  10. #20

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    The kanji you read as Isobe 服部 actually reads Hattori.

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