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Samurai Sword Markings

Article about: Hey guys, is anyone fluent enough to help me identify some markings on this sword? I am not sure if it is ww2 or later.

  1. #11

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    Thanks for letting me know Stu. I hope to continue adding to my collection over time. I just have to stay away from the high dollar items and collect in my price range.


  2. #12

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    So what do the other stamps mean. I looked through a bunch of stuff and I can't find them anywhere. Is it a date or a maker?

  3. #13
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    Although these swords were largely mass produced utilizing machinery they did have some hand finishing and the two kanji would likely be the surname of that finisher. It could have been a trained smith but far more likely would have been a factory worker with some training in the finishing aspect/procedure.

    If you can show the kanji in an upright position (tip of sword upward) they can be read and although I'm away from my kanji references at the moment someone will advise you soon as to the name.

    Regards,
    Stu

  4. #14
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    By the way, when I referred to them being made utilizing some machinery I was not meaning that they were made wholly by machines from steel as are the IJA Type 95 NCO swords. Your Officer sword has a greater degree of hands on work than does the Type 95.

    Regards,
    Stu

  5. #15
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    Quote by JerryB52 View Post
    So what do the other stamps mean. I looked through a bunch of stuff and I can't find them anywhere. Is it a date or a maker?
    Hi Jerry , if you look back to post number 3 you will see that Guy has very kindly translated the two kanji for you ......KANETADA .
    REGARDS AL

    We are the Pilgrims , master, we shall go
    Always a little further : it may be
    Beyond that last blue mountain barred with snow
    Across that angry or that glimmering sea...

  6. #16

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    The small stamp is the "showa" stamp. All sources I've read indicate that it means the blade was "non-traditionally made." I don't know why some non-traditional blades have the showa stamp and some don't, because I've seen plenty of blades that were clearly non-traditional, but had no showa stamp. I believe I read somewhere that they stopped using the stamp after a certain year???

    You didn't show us the other side of the nakago. There is often a date on the other side.

  7. #17

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    Thanks Stu, Bruce and Alan for your valuable information. I expect to have the blade in a few days to examine further. There was apparently a bend to the blade that I have to get straightened. It is apparently a very simple process.

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