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Shin Gunto Naval Ground Sword Info Needed

Article about: Hello, I have a Shin Gun to Naval sword similar to the one posted here. I have removed the everything and found the attached writing. I am hoping to identify where or who the sword came from

  1. #1

    Default Shin Gunto Naval Ground Sword Info Needed

    Hello,
    I have a Shin Gun to Naval sword similar to the one posted here. I have removed the everything and found the attached writing. I am hoping to identify where or who the sword came from. Thanks! Carl



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    Just interesting --
    --Guy[/QUOTE]

  2. #2

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    Hello and welcome to the forum!
    I have moved your post and started a new thread for your sword. Someone will be along shortly to help you. If not, please be patient, someone will come.
    Ralph.
    Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stamm. Kp. Pz. Erz. Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

  3. #3

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    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	989945Here are some more pictures...

  4. #4

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    武泰作
    Takeyasu Saku
    Made by Takeyasu

    The lacquered numbers are factory assembly numbers. I can't clearly see the numbers when magnified, but they look like
    一三三〇
    1330

    Yours is a kaigunto [navy military sword], and is made of stainless steel; the temper line is cosmetic, not real.


    --Guy

  5. #5

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    The saya (scabbard) being brown makes it a bit rare, so quite cool! Looks like the handle has the laquered canvas under the wrapping, which makes it late-war. Is there not writing on the other side of the tang (nakago)? There will often be a date or round naval arsenal stamp.

  6. #6

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    Quote by Bruce Pennington View Post
    The saya (scabbard) being brown makes it a bit rare, so quite cool! Looks like the handle has the laquered canvas under the wrapping, which makes it late-war. Is there not writing on the other side of the tang (nakago)? There will often be a date or round naval arsenal stamp.
    Thanks for all the great info. My grandfather got this sword in WW 2. You confirmed most of my thoughts on it. There isn't anything in the other side of nakago. I thought there should be more writing too but there isn't. How old do you think this is?

  7. #7

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    Quote by ghp95134 View Post
    武泰作
    Takeyasu Saku
    Made by Takeyasu

    The lacquered numbers are factory assembly numbers. I can't clearly see the numbers when magnified, but they look like
    一三三〇
    1330

    Yours is a kaigunto [navy military sword], and is made of stainless steel; the temper line is cosmetic, not real.


    --Guy
    It does have the 1330. You are correct.

  8. #8

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    Thanks for all of the info and for letting me finally know what the writing says. Any thoughts on how old the actual sword is? And maybe why there are no other markings. I appreciate it!

  9. #9

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    The blade is WW2 era
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  10. #10
    ?

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    As Bob says your Imperial Japanese Navy Officer Kai-gunto in Type 97 mounts is WW2 vintage and likely early 1940s from what I see.

    Regards,
    Stu

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