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Sword brought back from Japan- Analysis?

Article about: Hello, My mother's uncle served in the Pacific and saw quite a bit of combat. He brought this sword back from the war. This sword was passed along to me and I have been trying to research it

  1. #1

    Default Sword brought back from Japan- Analysis?

    Hello,

    My mother's uncle served in the Pacific and saw quite a bit of combat. He brought this sword back from the war. This sword was passed along to me and I have been trying to research it, but it's difficult. There are so many variants.

    Most swords that I have seen have a leather covering over the scabbard, this is just wood. I don't know if the cover is missing, or perhaps this was just a machine made sword for the civilian population.

    I appreciate all of the expertise that I have seen on this forum, and any information is appreciated.

    Regards,

    Steve
    Last edited by Stevecru; 02-17-2014 at 04:46 AM.

  2. #2

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    This is an Imperial Japanese Army officer's sword produced likely circa 1942/1943 when metal was bring conserved. It would have had a suspension ring mounted on the wood scabbard and leather covering. Blade appears to be a mass produced factory blade.

    - - ------- - -

    I did not notice that you were new. Welcome to the Forum!
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  3. #3

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    Quote by Stevecru View Post
    Hello,

    Most swords that I have seen have a leather covering over the scabbard, this is just wood. I don't know if the cover is missing, or perhaps this was just a machine made sword for the civilian population.

    I appreciate all of the expertise that I have seen on this forum, and any information is appreciated.

    Regards,

    Steve
    Hello and welcome to the forum!
    Actually, the covered scabbards are found less frequently. More often they are painted metal scabbards. This one may be a replacement.
    I like the look of the fittings on this one. They have the detail that I would expect to find on one of these. The menuki on the handle are what I would expect as well. The handle wrap is done nice and evenly also. Can we see some more and better photos of the blade?
    If you push out the bamboo pin in the handle, and remove the handle, you might find some Kanji on the tang.
    We have a few member here that will be able to help you more than I. Stu, Guy, Bob, or Alan will be along shortly.
    Ralph.
    Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stamm. Kp. Pz. Erz. Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

  4. #4

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    Attachment 647944Attachment 647945Attachment 647946Attachment 647947Attachment 647948Attachment 647949

    Thanks for the great replies. I have uploaded a few more pictures of the blade. I really don't want to take it apart. I'm afraid something will happen and I'll damage it in some way. So, I guess the consensus is that it is a late war, machine made blade, but definitely military, not civilian.

    Thanks again,

    Steve

  5. #5

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    Your latest pictures show jigane or grain in the steel. This is likely a hand forged blade and possibly older. In order to determine this, it will be necessary for you to remove the handle. It is not as difficult as you might think. There is a tapered pin in the handle. A hammer and mnail set are perfect tools for removing the pin. Once removed, you can then use a rubber, plastic or wooden mallet to knock the handle off. When photographing the sword tang, the picture should be taken with the end of the tang towards the point up and the butt of the tang down. A picture of the complete tang is necessary along with closeups of any kanji chisled in the tang.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  6. #6

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    I really like this sword.

  7. #7

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    Quote by BOB COLEMAN View Post
    ...When photographing the sword tang, the picture should be taken with the end of the tang towards the point up and the butt of the tang down. A picture of the complete tang is necessary along with closeups of any kanji chisled in the tang.
    Like this:



    --Guy

  8. #8

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    Quote by Stevecru View Post
    Thanks for the great replies. I have uploaded a few more pictures of the blade. I really don't want to take it apart. I'm afraid something will happen and I'll damage it in some way. So, I guess the consensus is that it is a late war, machine made blade, but definitely military, not civilian.

    Thanks again,

    Steve
    Hello Steve,
    There is a way to see if the handle will come off without any risk of damaging the sword.
    The pin in the handle is made of bamboo and tapered. Find the smaller end and gently tap it out with something that is a little smaller. Then hold the sword in your left hand with the tip pointed straight up as if you were going to use it, with your hand up tightly against the tsuba, (guard). Be sure to hold the sword firmly!
    With your right hand, make a fist and strike down on the top of your left hand. If this will jar the handle loose, it will only move slightly so there is no chance that the blade will go flying out or anything of the like. If it does come apart, make sure to keep track of the order that the parts come off in.
    If it does not come apart, simply tap the peg back in from the side it came out of.
    Ralph.
    Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stamm. Kp. Pz. Erz. Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

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