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Type 3 Japanese Tunic

Article about: I recently bought 2 WW2 Japanese tunics, my first venture into this area of collecting. I know what types they are, but would appreciate any input from the experts on this forum. In particul

  1. #1

    Default Type 3 Japanese Tunic

    I recently bought 2 WW2 Japanese tunics, my first venture into this area of collecting. I know what types they are, but would appreciate any input from the experts on this forum. In particular the translation of the ink stamps, and also who was this Type 3 issued to?
    I have seen some discourse as to badges being put on after the war, so have taken pics of the stitching.
    Cheers,
    Tony
    Type 3 Japanese TunicType 3 Japanese TunicType 3 Japanese TunicType 3 Japanese TunicType 3 Japanese Tunic

  2. #2
    ?

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    Can't comment on branch of service chest insignia. Chance collar tabs are period applied. I like the "invisible" tack stitch but black thread is iffy & would prefer to see olive drab thread. Still like to see photo of reverse collar to see stitch attachments. Tunic has two owners names so at least it was actually issued.

  3. #3

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    Named to Yorizane (surname) Naoji. The name is written twice, once using older kanji , the other in newer kanji .

    頼実直司
    Yorizane Naoji


    Size Small

    昭和十九年製
    Manufactured in Showa 19 [1935]

    大支検定

    Osaka Branch Arsenal Inspected/Approved

    Rank tab:

    Gunsō (軍曹) Sergeant

    I don't know if the rank tab is attached period, or later.


    --Guy

  4. #4

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    Thanks for the info. Isn't Showa 19 equal to 1944?

    Thanks for the kanji translation of the name, Guy. Any idea what the kanji above the surname represent?

    Cheers,
    Tony

  5. #5

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    Quote by bestmsdt View Post
    Thanks for the info. Isn't Showa 19 equal to 1944?

    Cheers,
    Tony
    Ach! My bad ... yes, 1944.
    Attached Images Attached Images Type 3 Japanese Tunic 

  6. #6

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    Quote by bestmsdt View Post
    ... Any idea what the kanji above the surname represent?
    Tony, when I first looked at those, they looked like some sort of designator like "A", "B", etc. using katakana. But I'm not certain.
    The entry that is crossed out looks like "chi" , and the last entry looks like "i" .

    I'm not certain (1) about the use of the katakana; and (2) if the crossed-out one is (I'm just guessing here).
    I am certain (1) that both names are to the same person, and (2) the katakana is definitely .


    --Guy

  7. #7

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    Thanks Guy. Why the first one was crossed out is the interesting question. Would it have been done just to rewrite the name with the simplified kanji? Or are those kana indicators of rank or some kind of role/position?
    Cheers,
    Tony

  8. #8

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    Quote by bestmsdt View Post
    Thanks Guy. Why the first one was crossed out is the interesting question. Would it have been done just to rewrite the name with the simplified kanji? Or are those kana indicators of rank or some kind of role/position?
    Cheers,
    Tony
    Tony,

    I have no idea why the first name was crossed out or what the leading katakana would mean.

    Sorry,
    --Guy

  9. #9

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    Thanks for the input so far. Had another look at the tunic at the weekend (work away), and took some more pics.

    I do think that 'chi' is correct above the first name entry. The branch of service does appear to be stuck on, so not good. More pics of the collar tabs (mostly the black thread does not make the back of the collar).

    Cheers,
    Tony
    Type 3 Japanese TunicType 3 Japanese TunicType 3 Japanese Tunic

  10. #10

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    If you are new to Japanese items, you need to know that unlike German uniforms, insignia on Japanese uniforms were all meant to be detachable, because they needed to be removed every time they were washed.

    The same applied to cap linings, which were meant to be removed and washed regularly. These are all no-nos for German collectors, but was a requirement and taken for granted in Japan.

    I show below some basic stitches an IJA soldier needed to learn to take care of his own uniform in this way. Even when someone returned from the war in uniform, it would be standard to keep the uniform without insignia, as you cannot store a worn uniform in humid Japan without washing it first, as it will otherwise get all mouldy.

    Grade 1 uniforms as Sunday best may be found with insignia attached and named, as they were kept in storage by the company, but uniforms regularly worn in the field, contrary to common belief would normally not be left with insignia.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Type 3 Japanese Tunic  

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