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Zero back in flight

Article about: Yesterday the Zero made the news again, as a restored fighter had its test flight at the Kanoya air base in Kyushu known as the base for many Tokko missions during the war. The plane in ques

  1. #21

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    Quote by nick komiya View Post
    They say the restoration was done in Russia and the USA. Why Russia I have no idea. The original engine was beyond restorable to flight condition, so for flying they use a P&W replacement engine.
    Possibly from equipment captured from the Japanese forces by the Soviet Army at the end of the war.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  2. #22

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    More likely just cheap labour and cost to do the engineering work-to get an airframe operational again after sitting in the tropics for decades requires almost complete rebuilding with new materials-this is more a case of a replica with some original parts-that's just the way it is with getting an airframe flyable again after what's happened to it-as I mentioned before, when an old car breaks down it trundles to a stop by the side of the road-when an old aircraft breaks down in mid flight...well that's when the crying starts.

  3. #23
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    Great to see this in the air , such a graceful aircraft when in flight .
    REGARDS AL

    We are the Pilgrims , master, we shall go
    Always a little further : it may be
    Beyond that last blue mountain barred with snow
    Across that angry or that glimmering sea...

  4. #24

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    One of WW2's most historic and important aircraft, it is so good to see everyone of these that can be rescued put back as near to original as one can get. Thank you for sharing that with us . . . but are the Yanks still so scared of the silhouette of an A6M3 that they felt it needed "watching" by another aircraft capable of dealing with it in case it got . . out of hand? If so then a good chioce!

  5. #25
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    The plane in the first post is not an a6m3 but an a6m5.....
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

Name:	a6m5 Zero.jpg 
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    JEDEM DAS SEINE

  6. #26

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    Quote by zwerge View Post
    The plane in the first post is not an a6m3 but an a6m5.....
    Yes, it was never meant to be.

  7. #27

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    Quote by zwerge View Post
    The plane in the first post is not an a6m3 but an a6m5.....
    Not saying you right or wrong but there isn't enough information in the pix, on here and elsewhere to accurately say. OK, like other Zero fans I can list the differences between an A6M3 (Type 22) and an A6M5 (Type 52) but the most visible is the external exhaust tubes exiting the cowl . . . but then this "reborn Zero" is fitted with a Pratt & Whitney engine remember?

    Does it matter? No. What matters is that it exists AND it flies too!

  8. #28
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    Quote by Hendreforgan View Post
    Not saying you right or wrong but there isn't enough information in the pix, on here and elsewhere to accurately say. OK, like other Zero fans I can list the differences between an A6M3 (Type 22) and an A6M5 (Type 52) but the most visible is the external exhaust tubes exiting the cowl . . . but then this "reborn Zero" is fitted with a Pratt & Whitney engine remember?

    Does it matter? No. What matters is that it exists AND it flies too!
    I was only pointing out that your reference to the picture in post #1 as an a6m3 was wrong,it`s an a6m5 as shown in my post #25,does it matter,only for accuracy......Pete.
    JEDEM DAS SEINE

  9. #29

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    Quote by zwerge View Post
    I was only pointing out that your reference to the picture in post #1 as an a6m3 was wrong
    Once again, I did not make such a reference, though I can see why you mistook it as such. I simply provided a link to photos and video of the restored and flying Zero, and provided a flying Zero photo from a separate source, as the photos from the event could not be cut and pasted. So the photo in post 1 is not from the event and related only in topic.

    Dwarf has been nitpicking a statement never made.

  10. #30

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    @zwerge, I stand humbly corrected yet I am also right. How does that happen? The Zero in the photo you link to most definitely is a Type 52 . . . but the Zero that this thread is about and took to the air again only days ago is, I very much believe, a Type 22. A lot of confusion is being created by the fact that virtually all information presently available on that plane is in Japanese. Does any reader know somebody who can read/speak Japanese that can decode the YouTube videos and the web-site? The web site is : https://www.zero-sen.jp/

    The Zero shown in the image referred to, tail fin # 61-120, relates to one rebuilt and flying again around 2009. It seems to have been sponsored by Tamiya Inc. . . which explains the presence of strange white stars on it's fuselage, a unique example of “product placement”? The Zero that has just flown is tail fin # A1-112 and here the “gumf” is still in Japanese. There is also the fact that for flying it is fitted with a Pratt & Whitney engine so it's possible it was fitted for flight with a modified engine cowling to suit? It does appear though to have the Type 22 cowl in this video of it's first flight : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImRD...oly-Lw&index=2 When shown still in parts in the news footage : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwJN...oly-Lw&index=3 the one there does appear to show air intake characteristics matching the Type 22. For me the best evidence is the wings, A1-112 has the shorter ailerons and folding wing tip of a Type 22. Totally different to the later and possibly more numerous Type 52.

    So . . if it's a Type 22 is it possible that during it's war career it actually flew from one of IJN's carriers? Most Type 52 flew from land bases. Tantalising, isn't it? How much history there could be that nobody yet can read! It also seems that during the last 20 years quite a few Zero's are starting to appear . . . has the stock of old P51 and Spitfire airframes run out and the millionaires are looking further afield? If so then that is good news! There was a reconstructed Zero, a A6M3 Type 22 with fin # X-133, used in the film “Pearl Harbour”. That one was recovered from New Guinea in 1991.

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