Page 1 of 8 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 73

Blood grooves on Bayonets

Article about: by Bochmann But you have to remember too the historic element of the dagger(s) in question as their purpose was originally to be used on it's own or in conjuntion with a sword or to finish a

  1. #1

    Default Blood grooves on Bayonets

    I hope this does not sound morbid,, but what is the purpose of the blood groove on a bayonet? Is it as sinister as it sounds what the meaning could be?...or is it something else,, and just called that. I have seen blood grooves on all different size blades,,, so the theory of the blade being lighter goes out the window when I see short boot knives with a blood groove,
    What are your thoughts on this... and is it as sinister as it sounds. Regards Larry
    It is not the size of a Collection in History that matters......Its the size of your Passion for it!! - Larry C

    One never knows what tree roots push to the surface of what laid buried before the tree was planted - Larry C

    “The farther back you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see.” - Winston Churchill

  2. # ADS
    Circuit advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Age
    2010
    P
    Many
     

  3. #2

    Default Re: Blood grooves on Bayonets

    "blood grooves" are purely for the purpose of lightening a blade. they don't have any effect on speed or severity of blood loss.

    as far as small blades also having this feature and that meaning that the intent of lightening the blade would not apply, when i say "lightening", i mean (as do blade manufacturers), achieving the same strength of blade while saving on manufacturing costs in terms of material used per blade. this savings is very large when you start considering the number of blades manufactured. companies will do everything they can to be efficient and the beauty of the blood groove is that it allows a large reduction in terms of cost without any loss whatsoever in quality... a rather rare combination.

  4. #3

    Default Re: Blood grooves on Bayonets

    Hi Larry. It stiffens the blade and it lightens the blade.

    Eric

    Edit Tempelhof beat me.
    [h=3]e plu·ri·bus u·num[/h]

  5. #4
    ?

    Default Re: Blood grooves on Bayonets

    I'd have to go with - The "blood groove" is actually called a fuller and its intent is to give the blade strength while reducing the weight and material used in construction.

  6. #5

    Default Re: Blood grooves on Bayonets

    Whilst I agree with tempelhof, I also think that by using the grooves, the maker can achieve a better balance to the weapon, which is an added bonus.

  7. #6

    Default Re: Blood grooves on Bayonets

    I read that myself,, but I wanted to see if there was more to it than just a material issue.....a spike bayonet can leave a wound that will never heal, as I have one of these type bayonets on my SKS. Why is it called blood groove?
    It is not the size of a Collection in History that matters......Its the size of your Passion for it!! - Larry C

    One never knows what tree roots push to the surface of what laid buried before the tree was planted - Larry C

    “The farther back you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see.” - Winston Churchill

  8. #7

    Default Re: Blood grooves on Bayonets

    strength and balance... two advantages i did not know. i always think in terms of profit and efficiency and all that kind of thing. just my background i guess.

  9. #8

    Default Re: Blood grooves on Bayonets

    It's all in the wrist action-engage, disembowel, disengage.
    Unlike your spike bayonet, when you pull it out, the blood will still be left on the blade and if you do not remove it properly will remain in the grooves.

  10. #9

    Default Re: Blood grooves on Bayonets

    One thing I am glad of when the design for the daggers we collect ,, did not have this money saving feature as i think an SA or SS dagger would look kind of silly,,, but in respect of the 2nd Model naval dagger,, which has similarities of such.. but it looks classy.
    It is not the size of a Collection in History that matters......Its the size of your Passion for it!! - Larry C

    One never knows what tree roots push to the surface of what laid buried before the tree was planted - Larry C

    “The farther back you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see.” - Winston Churchill

  11. #10

    Default Re: Blood grooves on Bayonets

    I read somewhere years ago that the purpose of the so-called blood grooves was to prevent "vacuum" from forming when inserted into a body and causing suction to "grab hold" of the blade, making it harder and slower to quickly withdraw it from the body. Personally, I rather doubt it, but this is what I was always told, in any case...
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

Page 1 of 8 12345 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Blood or rust?

    In Discussions
    04-11-2017, 06:31 PM
  2. blood rust

    In World Firearms
    03-23-2014, 12:50 AM
  3. Blood red snow

    In History and Research Third Reich and WW2
    04-17-2012, 04:50 PM
  4. US Blood Chit example #3 ORIGINAL?

    In Doc's, paper items, photos, propaganda
    02-22-2012, 05:21 PM
  5. US Blood Chit example #2

    In Doc's, paper items, photos, propaganda
    02-17-2012, 02:31 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •