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Dress bayonet, right?

Article about: by kfssir As a relativly new collector to the TR, i learn a new thing or more every time i read this forum. Happy new year to all Paul Hi Paul Glad your here..and enjoying the walk. There is

  1. #1

    Default Dress bayonet, right?

    Here's a bayonet in rough shape. A dress bayonet I think. Grandfather found it at a garage sale and gave it to me. I didn't think much of it until this winter when I went home and took some pictures of it.

    In case anyone wondered what the insides of these things look like, I took a picture of the silly little tang maneuver the manufacturer pulled. If it's a dress bayonet I see why they wouldn't bother with a more substantial tang anyway.

    best,

    JW

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  3. #2

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    Blade has been pulled out or loose and missing leather buffer plus broken grips not worth much my friend.
    Not a good specimen IMO: and a better one could be had.

    Eric
    [h=3]e plu·ri·bus u·num[/h]

  4. #3

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    A typical example of dress bayonet, produced by Robert Klass Solingen.
    Dress bayonet served only to "decorate" the NCO soldiers, and they usually not had strong structure.
    Interesting photos.

    Regards
    Vedran

  5. #4

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    Agree typical example of KS98 dress bayonet maker is Robert Klass it has been well used or abused. Looks like the short so called NCO varation. Could be restored to a extent but not much IMO. timothy

  6. #5

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    Period catalogs list both the long and short "Dress" bayonets as "Eigentums-Seitengewehr", "Extra-Seitengewehre" etc. And I know that senior grade NCO's (traditionally) had available to them government issue swords - and could also purchase for off duty use Officer's model swords and daggers. With my question being this: Is the purchase and use of the short "Dress" bayonets for the junior grade NCO's by Army Regulations, established German Army traditions, or could the short bayonets be purchased by anyone? Best Regards, Fred

  7. #6

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    Quote by Frogprince View Post
    Period catalogs list both the long and short "Dress" bayonets as "Eigentums-Seitengewehr", "Extra-Seitengewehre" etc. And I know that senior grade NCO's (traditionally) had available to them government issue swords - and could also purchase for off duty use Officer's model swords and daggers. With my question being this: Is the purchase and use of the short "Dress" bayonets for the junior grade NCO's by Army Regulations, established German Army traditions, or could the short bayonets be purchased by anyone? Best Regards, Fred
    I think Wheeler in his book makes mention that they could be purchased and used by anyone in the armed forces, the short model may just be a name we collectors gave it however he states that the short model was primarily worn by NCO's or officers but he also points out there are period pictures of them (NCO) wearing the long model so good question Frogprince. timothy

  8. #7

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    Lower NCO had a dress bayonet - length of bayonet is a matter of choice by customer, or could have an NCO swords - they was used for parades.
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    And yes, happy new year.

    Regards
    Vedran

  9. #8

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    The saber appears to be what is described in period catalogs as the Mannschaftssäbel, Mannschaft-Eigentums-Säbel etc. Which should not be confused (IMO) with the different private purchase “plain” (no extra decorative features like engraving etc.) Officer’s model swords or the “plain” brass hilted standard government issue Officer’s model saber. And if TR era German Army traditions followed the Imperial era (which I think they did) the sword pictured was considered an enlisted man’s off duty “dress” saber for mounted troops. With said swords in the Imperial era not restricted to just the lower grade NCO”s - but available for private purchase for all of the enlisted soldiers who were considered to be ‘mounted’. As contrasted with the Infantry/foot soldiers who would have carried “dress” bayonets while off duty. Best Regards, Fred

    And a Happy New Year to All !!

  10. #9
    ?

    Default

    As a relativly new collector to the TR, i learn a new thing or more every time i read this forum.

    Happy new year to all

    Paul

  11. #10

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    NCO saber was used by all of military families, not just the cavalry units.
    Bayonet and dagger are being used, because easier to wearing when you walk, and and simplified production.
    But the saber still has primacy, during a march in the parade.
    Almost all countries in this period are followed this trend.

    Regards
    Vedran

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