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K98 Bayonet Question - Restoration Complete

Article about: This is my 3rd installment concerning the recent K98 bayonet I recently purchased. I have soaked the handle, screws, & flash guard in vinegar as suggested and it worked great. It removed

  1. #11

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    Great work, glad to have been able to help.
    "and when he gets to heaven,
    to saint peter he will tell:
    "Just another marine reporting, sir
    I've served my time in hell."

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  3. #12

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    Does anyone know what the number on the tang means? Should there be any other numbers or markings on the tang?

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  4. #13

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    Quote by wpheaton View Post
    Does anyone know what the number on the tang means? Should there be any other numbers or markings on the tang?
    While there are some differences between makers and the different time periods, it's probably an assembly number. Matched to hidden assembly numbers on the bayonet catch presumably for speeding up the re-assembly of the components after bluing. With some earlier period bayonets also having the flash guards and grips etc. numbered for the same purpose. With some especially earlier period bayonets having identifier markings from the forging dies (they eventually wore out and had to be replaced), Waffenamts etc. Best Regards, Fred

  5. #14

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    Quote by Frogprince View Post
    While there are some differences between makers and the different time periods, it's probably an assembly number. Matched to hidden assembly numbers on the bayonet catch presumably for speeding up the re-assembly of the components after bluing. With some earlier period bayonets also having the flash guards and grips etc. numbered for the same purpose. With some especially earlier period bayonets having identifier markings from the forging dies (they eventually wore out and had to be replaced), Waffenamts etc. Best Regards, Fred
    Thanks Fred, always appreciate your wisdom & insight.

  6. #15
    SRB
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    very good ...... like new.

  7. #16

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    Quote by SRB View Post
    very good ...... like new.
    Thank You, it did come out rather well and excellent for the price.

    Do you know what size spanner fits the nuts on this bayonet? A friend had several a size 6, 8, 10, & 12 and none of the fit. Either the space between the prongs was too small for the screw shaft or the thickness of the prongs was too large for the slots in the nut.

    Thanks,

    William

  8. #17

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    Quote by wpheaton View Post
    .............Do you know what size spanner fits the nuts on this bayonet? A friend had several a size 6, 8, 10, & 12 and none of the fit. Either the space between the prongs was too small for the screw shaft or the thickness of the prongs was too large for the slots in the nut............
    William, Everything from that period was metric, and as in the factories German (Wehrmacht) armorers had tool kits (or in a factory setting selected tools) that were depending on the tool, either standard tools or custom made to service their weapons. Virtually impossible to find, I don't think offhand that I've ever seen an armorers tool kit that is 100% complete. That said, a Vermont American (brand name) #10 insert tool bit (part number 15442) is probably the closest you will find in an off the shelf tool for the spanner nut. But that won't get the job done unless it's ground/shaped to fit exactly. Also being a good idea IMO to have a custom made screwdriver for the screw slot, or at a minimum a proper size gunsmiths type of screwdriver. Best Regards, Fred

  9. #18

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    A very conscientiously done job. Always nice to see restoration work done the right way, and the end results are always obvious as well. Now, just slap it on a Mauser and you'll be all set! Well done!
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  10. #19

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    Quote by Wagriff View Post
    A very conscientiously done job. Always nice to see restoration work done the right way, and the end results are always obvious as well. Now, just slap it on a Mauser and you'll be all set! Well done!
    I've got to get that Mauser now. Next on the wish list.

  11. #20
    SRB
    SRB is offline
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    i dont know what nuber is,but im make my tool and work
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    Last edited by SRB; 05-07-2016 at 01:00 PM.

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