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Nahkampfspange in Bronze FLL

Article about: The backplates on some close combat clasp's are held in place only by very tenuous means at times, like this example by Friedrich Linden. The only apparent crimping on this particular type i

  1. #11

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    The backplates on some close combat clasp's are held in place only by very tenuous means at times, like this example by Friedrich Linden. The only apparent crimping on this particular type is a shallow vertical slot either side of the backplate that has been struck to open it up a little and 'squeeze' the sides of the plate tight. Hence it's easy to see how these could easily come loose and fall out under normal wear conditions, never mind combat ones.

    Indeed, S&L started producing this award using an almost identical crimping method, but later in the war it can be noticed that they switched to producing clasps with an INTEGRAL backplate, actually part of the die pressed blank that was later painted/ chemically coloured(?) black. This would appear to indicate that they were aware that the securing method of the original backplate was not a particularly good and so redesigned it.

    There were various methods that were used to fix backplates by different manufacturers, some better than others, for example the use of small pressed 'tabs' as seen below on my AGMuK example were found to be more efficient. It's not often that you'll find a clasp using this method of securing the backplate with it missing, and if you do it needs looking at closely to ensure it's not fake. The same goes with backplates that are too small, allowing them to be glued in after the fake clasp with tabs has been cast.

    When you look at it, the methods used to secure a plate probably came down to the cost of the design, the tooling required and the ease of production, and sometimes it was improved on, and sometimes left as is. That's my theory anyway!
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

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    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

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  3. #12

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    Hi Ned,

    good job as always from you!

    Regarding the clasp with the integral backplate who is attributed to S&L:Militaria321.com - Auction - LOGIN

    My personal opinion is that this clasp could be produced after the war.I have never seen a clasp like this coming from a private vet purchaise.Thatīs my personal reason,why i have this type not in my collection.I think there is no last proof and maybe i am wrong,but my feeling says me postwar.

    However,the different crimping methods of the backplates are interesting enough.

  4. #13

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    A lovely Nahkampfspange Nick.

  5. #14

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    Congrats Nick!
    Unfortunate about the missing back plate.
    Soon you'll be looking for "Mint" examples of some of the awards that you are now starting to purchase.
    I also have a bit of a theory why some are found without back plates.
    With some of the crimping methods used, and with the amount of bend found in some of the different makers products, it is possible that when the ones with minimal crimping are pressed straight, there is not enough of the back plate caught under the crimp. During fighting it is quite possible that enough pressure has been put on the badge to straighten it some. This would mean that it is quite possible for the back plate to become loose. If you don't mind, I will post a few photos to show what I mean.
    I will start with my example of an AGMuK. This one has minimal crimp but, we can see how tight the back plate fits. It has actually bulged the back plate when the crimp was done. This badge is quite straight.
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    Next is my example of the one you have just aquired, a FLL. This one shows not very much of the back plate is under the crimp. This badge is more curved than the AGMuK.
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    Last is my example of a F&BL. This one is the one I aquired to complete the medals for my father. This one shows that the back plate is quite a bit smaller than the space provided for it and there is virtually none of the back plate under the crimp. This example is actually the one with the most curve.
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    Here is a couple of photos showing the amount of curve to these awards.
    Ralph.
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    Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stamm. Kp. Pz. Erz. Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

  6. #15

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    Your "FLL" clasp is a killer Ralph!The other two clasps are also very nice,but a "FLL" to find in this condition is very very hard.

  7. #16

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    Quote by Kradmelder View Post
    Your "FLL" clasp is a killer Ralph!The other two clasps are also very nice,but a "FLL" to find in this condition is very very hard.
    Agreed, very nice example, Ralph!

  8. #17

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    Thank you Ned and Ralph for your interesting views !

    @Ralph they are wonderful examples !

    Nick
    "In all my years as a soldier, I have never seen men fight so hard." - SS Obergruppenfuhrer Wilhelm Bittrich - Arnhem

  9. #18

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    Quote by Kradmelder View Post
    Your "FLL" clasp is a killer Ralph!The other two clasps are also very nice,but a "FLL" to find in this condition is very very hard.
    Thank you Joachim!
    Ralph.

    - - ------- - -

    Quote by youthcollector1 View Post
    Agreed, very nice example, Ralph!
    Thank you as well!
    Ralph.
    Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stamm. Kp. Pz. Erz. Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

  10. #19

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    Quote by Woolgar View Post
    Thank you Ned and Ralph for your interesting views !

    @Ralph they are wonderful examples !

    Nick
    Thanks Nick!
    Ralph.
    Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stamm. Kp. Pz. Erz. Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

  11. #20

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    nice one NIck.

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