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Brown plastic swastika with a series of circles in the arms

Article about: Just to share this nice item, it is in good condition, There are still many of them but just a "small" nice piece of history. Plastic construction and in the shape of a brown rever

  1. #1

    Default Brown plastic swastika with a series of circles in the arms

    Just to share this nice item, it is in good condition, There are still many of them but just a "small" nice piece of history.

    Plastic construction and in the shape of a brown reverse swastika with remains of green pertina/color , and a series of circles in the arms. Pin-back type with the manufacturer's name "Klethern Kreis stade" and the city "Langobardisch UM 500". With the swastika being "reversed"
    KLETHEN KREIS STADE is not a maker mark, it is where this antique artifact was found by archelologists. Klethen is the city, Stade the greater area (also a city). The "um 500" after Langobardisch means the artifact dates back to the year 500. The Langobarden are an ancient Germanic tribe

    Those plastic pins were sold to obtain funds for the nazi benefaction campaign organized by the SS-gruppenführer Erich Hilgenfeldt
    These tinnies were given out to individuals to recognize their participation in events. The event could be a fund raiser, a celebration and a myriad of other activities
    The construction of all the German WWII tinnies can be boiled down to two basic materials: plastic or metal. Metal tinnies were very thin and were stamped. Plastic tinnies were molded. The quality of the items varies from poor to excellent. All tinies have a pin affixed to the back which allowed them to be placed in a shirt or hat. some tinnies are stamped with the manufacturer markings. however, not all of them are.

    Regards
    John


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  3. #2

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    Those plastic pins were sold to obtain funds for the nazi benefaction campaign organized by the SS-gruppenführer Erich Hilgenfeldt. These tinnies were given out to individuals to recognize their participation in events. The event could be a fund raiser, a celebration and a myriad of other activities. The construction of all the German WWII tinnies can be boiled down to two basic materials: plastic or metal. Metal tinnies were very thin and were stamped. Plastic tinnies were molded. The quality of the items varies from poor to excellent. All tinies have a pin affixed to the back which allowed them to be placed in a shirt or hat. some tinnies are stamped with the manufacturer markings. however, not all of them are.


    I am really sorry and I mean all due respect but very little of what is said here is fact. Since this site is read by many seeking factual information I felt compelled to interject.

    First, the plastic swastika piece you show is from a series of pieces sold by the Winterhilfswerk during the 3rd KWHW RSS drive on the 27th & 28th of September 1941. The history you provided of the piece and its meaning is correct...but these were not handed out to anyone other than folks that donated to the KWHW on the dates I listed above.

    Second, tagungsabzeichen, day badges, conference badges, tinnies...whatever someone wants to call them were constructed in many many different materials. You can find them in, metal, wood, plastic, amber, cloth and many other materials. Not all metal badges were stamped; there are many that are solid in construction.

    We will be covering all of this information in our upcoming book. I do not mean any disrespect but I felt that I needed to correct some inaccuracies.

    Respectfully,
    Chrys

  4. #3
    ?

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    Hey John
    How about using the white print instead of the black. It makes it much easier to read friend.

  5. #4

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    Hi Chrys
    All information is wellcome, what I wrote is just what I know more or less, so thank you for your additional info. I also got some of my info from Whermacht-Awards.com, so as you see there are always a lot og diffrent infos.
    Regards
    John

  6. #5

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    Hi Steve
    Yes I know, but sometimes I just copy my text form my Word, and I forget to change color.
    Regards
    John

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