Become our sponsor and display your banner here

View Poll Results: How do you approach displaying your pieces? (flags, uniforms, etc.)

Voters
93. You may not vote on this poll
  • I don't usually show people, or display it.

    11 11.83%
  • I don't display it, but will show people I know will understand. and find it interesting

    22 23.66%
  • I display it, but only in an office or back room.

    37 39.78%
  • I display my stuff proudly for all to see.

    23 24.73%
Page 8 of 11 FirstFirst ... 4567891011 LastLast
Results 71 to 80 of 104

How do people react when they see your Nazi displays?

Article about: I stopped caring for other peoples opinions a long time ago. The only people that see my collection are my family members anyway, but I don't see a reason to hide my items if someone else co

  1. #71

    Default

    I have deleted a post dealing with assigning political views from other countrys that have nothing to do with this thread. Keep this thread on topic or it will be closed.
    BOB

    LIFE'S LOSERS NEVER LEARN FROM THE ERROR OF THEIR WAYS.

  2. # ADS
    Circuit advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    Age
    2010
    P
    Many
     

  3. #72

    Default

    Displaying a collection is a tricky business. A long time ago, I had a shop that I ran, and I had hung on the wall for sale an original Civil War Confederate Stars and Bars battle flag and next to it was a WWII silk Japanese Naval Rising Sun flag. I Immediately began to notice a change in people and then the rumors began to fly. Finally, I had a friend come in and whisper confidentially that people in town "did not Like the fact that I had the 2 flags hanging", and so, I eventually had to take them down and Fold them inside my glass fronted counter. They both sold very quickly after that-it was like they were okey to Buy but not to Show. To this day, I still have no clue as to what the town people were thinking. I'm not Japanese and I don't have a Ozarks Southern style accent, so what in the name of Pete they thought, I have no clue! lol But, yes-people can and always will be strange over the oddest things, so, by all means, be careful. If you choose to display or show selected people different things, make sure you Know the person well before you do. Idiotic reputation slurring like this can haunt a person for decades.(One guy once called me a "Nazi-Commie", and I never did decipher that one. Is it like a Democratic-Republican"??)
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  4. #73

    Default

    'Nazi-Commie'? Thats a good one! Kind of like a right-wing lefty?

  5. #74

    Default

    Quote by Wagriff View Post
    One guy once called me a "Nazi-Commie", and I never did decipher that one. Is it like a Democratic-Republican"?
    This brings absurdity to a whole new level... Right, we interrupt this thread for a call to arms:

    Islamist Zionists and Secessionist Unionists unite! Only you can fight the Nazi-Communist threat to the Anarcho-Feudalist principles and Atheist Christian values of the European-Antarctic continent!

    Sorry, just couldn't resist it. Some people's stupidity is quite remarkable.

  6. #75

    Default

    IMO what comes across strongly in this thread is that there appears to be a hign degree of socially imposed secrecy about collecting and displaying these particular artifacts outside of a small number of pre-vetted people who are alowed in to the secret or inner sanctum of the Nazi era collector. Maybe the social notoriety is all part of the growing attraction for some collecting Nazi era memorabilia, like belonging to a taboo cult or group that society at large does not approve of.
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  7. #76

    Default

    Is it OK to collect memorabilia with a morally dubious past?
    Herald Scotland 2009:

    "Does it matter whether adults wish to collect, or even adorn themselves with, objects associated with the Nazi regime? I think it does and, while I am not in favour of legally proscribing such activities, we are entitled to take a view about their wider social implications.

    These days, the far right prefer not to wear uniforms in public. Those jackboots would tend to give the wrong impression – or rather, the correct impression. Yet any discussion of the rights or wrongs of collecting Nazi memorabilia must begin in the context of the rise of the politics of people like Nick Griffin.

    Such an interest tends to be justified on either historical or aesthetic grounds. Garlasco has defended himself on the former, saying he and others “collect war paraphernalia because we want to learn from the past”. One could learn from, say, Ian Kershaw’s biography of Hitler, but it is not clear what can be learned from close proximity to a uniform or a medal, since historical knowledge is not transferred by osmosis.

    Nor is aesthetic appreciation a valid argument. Bryan Ferry was criticised recently for expressing admiration for the cinema of Leni Riefenstahl and the architecture of Albert Speer. But as George Orwell wrote: “The first thing that we ask of a wall is that it shall stand up. If it stands up, it is a good wall, and the question of what purpose it serves is separable from that. And yet even the best wall in the world deserves to be pulled down if it surrounds a concentration camp.”

    The urge behind the fascination with Nazi memorabilia is, I suspiect, the thrill of transgression, of admiring that which is almost universally despised. This impulse led, during the 1970s, to several leading punks wearing swastikas as a shock tactic. This was, and is, a form of moral imbecility. Certain words and symbols are now inescapably associated with the Nazis and the Holocaust – they are not free-floating signifiers to be given any meaning we choose; nor can they be pulled from the context of Hitler’s Germany and treated as examples of, say, 1930s costume design.

    The issue is different from those surrounding the colonial looting of cultural relics from the global South, or the collection of artefacts linked to New World slavery. The former is an ongoing injustice and the latter in poor taste, but these are arguments about history. Fascism is different; it survives, and the fact it now comes dressed in a suit and a tie means we have to treat anything which threatens to trivialise its horrific past with extreme caution.

    Reducing Nazi memorabilia to a set of collectable objects with no political content normalises them, and to normalise fascism is to prepare for its return. At best, it is naive; at worst it is the cultural equivalent of the political argument that treats contemporary fascist organisations as conventional, if right-wing political parties, rather than as the inheritors of Auschwitz they truly are."

    Neil Davidson is a senior research fellow in geography and sociology at Strathclyde University, and author of several books including Discovering The Scottish Revolution.
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  8. #77
    ?

    Default

    Soooo if i collect old bibles and other religious artifacts, then i am a hidden supporter for all the religiuos wars and evil acts we have seen thru the last hundreds of years.
    Collect ROA, Cossack, Schuma and other WW2 Volunteer militaria.

    "Be Humble and kind, for you may find that it was Odin you entertained"

  9. #78

    Default

    A friend of mine collects Catholic bibles, arteficts and documents from the period of the persecution of Catholics in Elizabethan England, he is a Knight of the Sovereign Order of Malta hence the interest rather than being a supporter of the Inquisition
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  10. #79

    Default

    Quote by StefanM View Post
    Is it OK to collect memorabilia with a morally dubious past?
    Herald Scotland 2009:

    "Does it matter whether adults wish to collect, or even adorn themselves with, objects associated with the Nazi regime? I think it does and, while I am not in favour of legally proscribing such activities, we are entitled to take a view about their wider social implications.

    These days, the far right prefer not to wear uniforms in public. Those jackboots would tend to give the wrong impression – or rather, the correct impression. Yet any discussion of the rights or wrongs of collecting Nazi memorabilia must begin in the context of the rise of the politics of people like Nick Griffin.

    Such an interest tends to be justified on either historical or aesthetic grounds. Garlasco has defended himself on the former, saying he and others “collect war paraphernalia because we want to learn from the past”. One could learn from, say, Ian Kershaw’s biography of Hitler, but it is not clear what can be learned from close proximity to a uniform or a medal, since historical knowledge is not transferred by osmosis.

    Nor is aesthetic appreciation a valid argument. Bryan Ferry was criticised recently for expressing admiration for the cinema of Leni Riefenstahl and the architecture of Albert Speer. But as George Orwell wrote: “The first thing that we ask of a wall is that it shall stand up. If it stands up, it is a good wall, and the question of what purpose it serves is separable from that. And yet even the best wall in the world deserves to be pulled down if it surrounds a concentration camp.”

    The urge behind the fascination with Nazi memorabilia is, I suspiect, the thrill of transgression, of admiring that which is almost universally despised. This impulse led, during the 1970s, to several leading punks wearing swastikas as a shock tactic. This was, and is, a form of moral imbecility. Certain words and symbols are now inescapably associated with the Nazis and the Holocaust – they are not free-floating signifiers to be given any meaning we choose; nor can they be pulled from the context of Hitler’s Germany and treated as examples of, say, 1930s costume design.

    The issue is different from those surrounding the colonial looting of cultural relics from the global South, or the collection of artefacts linked to New World slavery. The former is an ongoing injustice and the latter in poor taste, but these are arguments about history. Fascism is different; it survives, and the fact it now comes dressed in a suit and a tie means we have to treat anything which threatens to trivialise its horrific past with extreme caution.

    Reducing Nazi memorabilia to a set of collectable objects with no political content normalises them, and to normalise fascism is to prepare for its return. At best, it is naive; at worst it is the cultural equivalent of the political argument that treats contemporary fascist organisations as conventional, if right-wing political parties, rather than as the inheritors of Auschwitz they truly are."

    Neil Davidson is a senior research fellow in geography and sociology at Strathclyde University, and author of several books including Discovering The Scottish Revolution.
    Apparently an idiot and of course another example of a parchment person with built in bias and yellow journalistic tendencies, strengthened by European roots and peer mentality. No ability for open thought and just an applied opinion in blanket form to something he does not understand. Guys like this were most often breast fed too long as children and have an inner feeling of both superiority and insecurity. This combination is often found on college campus area's and with people who drive antique Volkswagen beetles with no knowledge of their history. I know this because I read it on the web.

  11. #80
    ?

    Default

    Quote by StefanM View Post
    Is it OK to collect memorabilia with a morally dubious past?
    Without getting overly political, I will say that these academics willfully retain their inability to distinguish between interest and support. He sees no difference between putting a Party flag out on the porch during Hitler's birthday and keeping one in a display case next to a helmet. This is not ignorance, but an elitism which views certain people as incapable of responsibly owning items associated with genocide.

Page 8 of 11 FirstFirst ... 4567891011 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Little Displays I just Did

    In Collections display
    10-09-2012, 02:40 AM
  2. Polizei Displays

    In Deutsche Polizei forum
    07-24-2012, 04:39 PM
  3. Post Your cap displays please

    In Cloth Headgear
    06-04-2012, 04:00 AM
  4. 02-03-2012, 01:19 AM
  5. moderators displays

    In Discussions
    05-28-2011, 02:46 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •