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Reichsarbeitsdienst weibliche Jugend broach

Article about: This was the badge worn on the neck scarf by former members of the female section of the RAD. The silver wash finish often survives better on the back of the badge. Cheers, Ade.

  1. #11
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    Picked this up recently, and thanks to Ade's link I now know it's a RADwJ 3rd pattern
    Jeff

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  3. #12

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    Nice one Jeff, any idea on maker?

    Tom

  4. #13

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    I take it this one below is the 1st type, or is it
    a lower grade.........?
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    Regards,


    Steve.

  5. #14

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    Quote by Walkwolf View Post
    I take it this one below is the 1st type, or is it
    a lower grade.........?
    Neither.

    This badge was worn by young women serving in the RADwJ's Kriegshilfsdienst (KHD), a half-year extension of labor service duty proper that was spent working in some capacity that directly or indirectly contributed to the war effort. (For example with public health/welfare services, the armaments industry, public transportation and communicatIon, clerical work for the armed forces etc.)

    The badge was typically worn on civilian clothing or - if applicable - the specific duty clothing/uniform that went with that occupation, for example, in case of the railways or postal service.

  6. #15

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    I wasn't sure - Thanks for the clarification.........!
    Regards,


    Steve.

  7. #16
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    Quote by StuG III View Post
    Nice one Jeff, any idea on maker?

    Tom
    Hi Tom, I'm still learning but I think '40' is Berg & Nolte...

  8. #17

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    I think the "40" would be more likely to indicate year of manufacture than maker, but I could be mistaken. Reason I ask is because I have one with identical markings.

    Tom
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  9. #18

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    Quote by StuG III View Post
    I think the "40" would be more likely to indicate year of manufacture than maker, but I could be mistaken. Reason I ask is because I have one with identical markings.
    This is not my area of expertise, but I would tend to agree that "40" is the year of manufacture and "U" the maker's mark.

  10. #19
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    I believe according to Litlejohn and Angolia in the book "Labor organizations of the Third Reich" "U" de-notes Arbeietsmaid Sonderfurerin or "U" for Unter or lower.. I am still trying to piece this together though and could be absolutely wrong...G
    I'd rather be A "RaD Man than a Mad Man "

  11. #20

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    Quote by Gwar View Post
    I believe according to Litlejohn and Angolia in the book "Labor organizations of the Third Reich" "U" de-notes Arbeietsmaid Sonderfurerin or "U" for Unter or lower.. I am still trying to piece this together though and could be absolutely wrong...G
    Pure nonsense. Never the sort of rank was included at the reverse. Not
    according to regulation anyway, but I doubt the both gentlemen ever
    had seen the original publication/regulation from the RAD.

    The number included is always the year of manufacturing; the U is the manufacturer,
    which I do not know right now. Yes, I remember again, as a short while ago it was also
    asked with another RAD badge: the concern Heinrich Ulbricht's Witwe
    from Kaufing near Schwanenstadt (this is Austria). Also the official sign is included.
    "U" was one of the official manufacturers!
    "Wir sollen auch unser Leben für die Brüder lassen" (1.Joh.3.16):
    zum Gedächtnis Wilhelm Schenk. Er starb fürs Vaterland am 13. Juni 1916

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