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Replacing broken pin on an enamel NSDAP party badge

Article about: There is a transitional RZM period party badge I've came across that I can get quite cheaply. Problem is, the pin is broken. The round mounting plate is still present, as well as a small pie

  1. #1

    Default Replacing broken pin on an enamel NSDAP party badge

    There is a transitional RZM period party badge I've came across that I can get quite cheaply. Problem is, the pin is broken. The round mounting plate is still present, as well as a small piece of the original pin. I've read about people replacing broken pins on these badges, and I am curious how it is done. Is the mounting plate soldered or glued on? Where might I be able to obtain a new pin? It doesn't necessarily have to be a period pin, that would be great, but even a modern pin that's the same design as an original period would satisfy me.

    Thanks everyone for the help!

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  3. #2
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    A picture is a must for any advice.

  4. #3

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    Pin plates are soldered onto the badge. It can be done, obviously, but carefully and not by me. If you're capable, a hobby grade soldering iron should do the job well.

    To offer an opinion on your badge, it must be posted as SteveR eluded to.

    Mark

  5. #4

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    Here are photos of the badge. I know it's in rough shape, but I can get it cheap enough that it doesn't matter. It'll look good with my other "been there" pieces. Also I would like to see what I can do restoration wise, just a little project. Restoring old jewelry is a hobby of mine, and these badges are essentially jewelry. I'd say I can make it look a lot better with some work, buff off all that messy glue and such. I'm fairly good at soldering, and I do have a soldering iron. I'm more interested in finding a cheap replacement pin 2 or 3 bucks that matches the original style. I'd hate to just put a ghetto looking safety pin in there.




    So the pin plate is soldered on. Well, that should just me a matter of heating it to the melting point, removing it, put a new pin in, and resolder.

    Thanks for the replies fellas.

  6. #5
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    It looks nice from the front! Personally, I'd just remove the glue on the back and leave it as-is, but actually, some do prefer to replace the pins. As for the replacement pin, I'd look around on eBay or something for a cheap postwar German pin of some type and use the pin from that. Many manufacturers used the same type of pin plate after the war.

  7. #6

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    Quote by Erno View Post
    It looks nice from the front! Personally, I'd just remove the glue on the back and leave it as-is, but actually, some do prefer to replace the pins. As for the replacement pin, I'd look around on eBay or something for a cheap postwar German pin of some type and use the pin from that. Many manufacturers used the same type of pin plate after the war.
    I think I'm going to buy this badge on eBay, $4.99 shipped, and remove the pin from it. The pin design 'looks' the same, but I'm now wondering if the pins on the NSDAP enamel badges are actually a part of the mounting plate. I believe the pin just slides into the raised groove right down the middle of the pin plate but I can't be sure.

    Last edited by RailwayEagle; 04-22-2014 at 03:39 PM. Reason: Forgot picture

  8. #7

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    I had one come loose once. I have done soldering in my work as a gunsmith here in my shop. So I thought I would try it. It came out well for me. The key is not too much heat and a low temp solder. The hardest part is centering it and using a very small torch tip to reduce heated area. I would Recommend a soldering gun to those who has not done a lot of this. It is like trying to solder on your finger nail.
    Just my thoughts on this.

    John
    I specialize in M1 carbines and Lugers.

  9. #8

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    Quote by guns ltd View Post
    I had one come loose once. I have done soldering in my work as a gunsmith here in my shop. So I thought I would try it. It came out well for me. The key is not too much heat and a low temp solder. The hardest part is centering it and using a very small torch tip to reduce heated area. I would Recommend a soldering gun to those who has not done a lot of this. It is like trying to solder on your finger nail.
    Just my thoughts on this.

    John
    I'm hoping my soldering iron will work on this. I don't want to have to invest money into tools since I'm trying to save money by buying a badge with a broken pin and replacing it. I haven't ordered the badge yet, having second thoughts about it now though.

  10. #9

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    I think you'll be fine with cleaning the glue off and putting a similar pin back onto the badge. Personally, I'd look for a closer match, there's no rush

    The badge has a nice obverse, good find.

    Mark

  11. #10

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    Quote by Greenhorn View Post
    I think you'll be fine with cleaning the glue off and putting a similar pin back onto the badge. Personally, I'd look for a closer match, there's no rush

    The badge has a nice obverse, good find.

    Mark
    Waiting for the PayPal invoice from the seller right now ; I imagine the badge will look better in person, the camera flash really brings out every little scratch, nick, and imperfection in the enamel. I mainly want it because it's a transitional period badge.

    I'll definitely be keeping an eye out for a good replacement pin.

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