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German cross in gold (Deutsches Kreuz)

Article about: German cross in gold. How rare are this cross in gold? I see that around 26000 was given this award during 2ww. Are they hard to find i todays collector marked?

  1. #1

    Default German cross in gold (Deutsches Kreuz)

    German cross in gold. How rare are this cross in gold? I see that around 26000 was given this award during 2ww. Are they hard to find in todays collector marked?

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  3. #2

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    Actually, I think that I see more Gold ones for sale than Silver(the silvers being one tenth as many issued). They are quite costly awards, but are generally available out there somewhere at most given times. They are, I believe, one of the most impressively designed German awards issued and despite the numbers, every collector would love to have one.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  4. #3

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    Ok. Thank you for your helpfull answer. How rare are it to find german cross in the original presentation box compered to the one without this box?

  5. #4

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    Generally is it not hard to find a nice german cross i.G (look in the sale area here). For example a light cross made by Zimmermann is often to get, also in good condition. The early crosses for example made by Godet are harder to find and the price is also much higher for a cross in good condition.

  6. #5

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    The cases you can usually find with, perhaps, 1/2 of the awards you come across. It does add some to the overall value, of course.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  7. #6

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    The gold version is not rare by any means my friend, there's a lot out there including some in excellent as new condition. Silver examples are less common due to fewer being awarded (under 2,500) but it should be remembered that at the end of the war there were still large stocks of high end awards including DK's that had not been awarded and were "liberated" from these stocks by allied troops (mainly American) from places like the noted Schloss Klessheim, a castle outside Salzburg, Austria,where the Prasidialkanzlei (PKZ) moved their supply of high level awards from Berlin in 1944.

    The German Cross was manufactured by several known makers from late 1941 onwards, and it's the various makers who can cause a price variation due to the rarity of some of these types, especially the earlier ones, that are somewhat uncommon. Examples include Juncker, Godet and early Zimmermann LDO (marked L/52) crosses. Later crosses like those of the PKZ numbered Zimmermann and Klein (20 and 134) are far more readily found, and very often cased and near mint having probably come from the Klessheim horde. With these more common later crosses condition weighs heavily unless rock solid provenance connects them to a recipient of note when the worn/damaged examples are also a premium.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  8. #7

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    Quote by Wagriff View Post
    The cases you can usually find with, perhaps, 1/2 of the awards you come across. It does add some to the overall value, of course.
    Around about $1000 if in good condition.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  9. #8

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    Ned and Wagriff. Thank you very much for this very helpfull information.

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