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Marksman shooting lanyard

Article about: This one here belongs to a friend and he would like to trade it for a ww2 pano of some Canadian ww2 troops training at camp Borden, I have a few questions but my main concern is authenticity

  1. #1

    Default Marksman shooting lanyard

    This one here belongs to a friend and he would like to trade it for a ww2 pano of some Canadian ww2 troops training at camp Borden, I have a few questions but my main concern is authenticity. I am only 16 and still learning much! It looks pretty good from what I see but a second opinion is definitely needed! Also I know you guys don't like to deal with value much but what do you think a fair retail value would be on a piece like this in its present condition? Also any idea what class it is? Thank you so much in advance!

    Beau
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  3. #2

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    It's the second version - type 2 - grades 1 to 4.
    Successive grades are indicated by 'acorns'
    attached to the plain end. Looks to be
    original in my eyes.........
    Regards,


    Steve.

  4. #3

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    I agree with Steve, original.
    I wouldn't go much more than $125.
    Ralph.
    Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stamm. Kp. Pz. Erz. Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

  5. #4

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    Thanks a lot! That's what I've tended to see them sell for online, think your spot on, also I'm kind of confused by these grades or classes, what exactly was the purpose of them? I've never had any lanyards before and am quite new to the German awards in particular
    Thanks,
    Beau

  6. #5

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    Quote by BeauHarper View Post
    Thanks a lot! That's what I've tended to see them sell for online, think your spot on, also I'm kind of confused by these grades or classes, what exactly was the purpose of them?
    The purpose was simply to motivate soldiers to hone, maintain and improve their marksmanship skills.

    Creating a handsome visible distinction, particularly one in mutliple grades which could be successively attained by repeated re-qualification went a long way towards that purpose.

    These lanyards were not unique to the Third Reich period, by the way. Schützenschnüre in the modern sense date back to the imperial era; they were introduced in 1894. The post-WW1 Reichswehr broke with that tradition and utilized sleeve stripes until the Wehrmacht (re)introduced the marskmanship lanyard in 1936. The East German army (NVA) awarded marksmanship lanyards from 1957 onwards and the Bundeswehr has them since 1965.
    Last edited by HPL2008; 12-04-2015 at 06:40 PM.

  7. #6

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    Quote by BeauHarper View Post
    Thanks a lot! That's what I've tended to see them sell for online, think your spot on, also I'm kind of confused by these grades or classes, what exactly was the purpose of them? I've never had any lanyards before and am quite new to the German awards in particular
    Thanks,
    Beau
    Some very good info has been posted on this thread showing my collection. A few more have been added since then.
    My small collection of Schützenschnur
    Ralph.
    Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stamm. Kp. Pz. Erz. Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

  8. #7

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    Quote by BeauHarper View Post
    what exactly was the purpose of them? Beau
    Hi Beau,

    The purpose of the lanyards was (and is as this is still practiced in some armies the Bundeswehr for one) to give a visual indication of a soldiers "skill at arms" and therefore his status relative to his peers in a similar way to trade badges and combat awards. They show a degree of qualification within his field and therefore, within context, experience. The best way I can illustrate this is to ask how does one tell the difference between two soldiers of the same rank, one fresh from the factory and the other who has been there and done that? There are many ways if you know what to look for. Of course physical appearance and bearing are indicators but not 100% whereas service / qualification badges, jetons and awards that are earned by the soldiers experience and training are clear indicators to those not able to observe the more subtle signs!
    I hope this answers the question and I hope you continue with your collecting whether it be of Third Reich or other militaria. If you learn what is behind the atifacts you will get so much more out of the hobby that you will never get bored. I've been at it more than 40 years and feel I have barely scratched the surface!

    Regards

    Mark
    "War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. A man who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing he cares more about than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature with no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."

  9. #8

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    Thanks for all the wonderful responses! They have been very informative. I understand it for the most part but where I am stuck is did they just get the lanyard upon the first qualification then acorn for each re certification up to four? What happened after the fourth? As Walkwolf says grades 1-4 above. Also is there an exact date that the second model (one pictured) was issued from and until what date?
    Thanks!
    beau

  10. #9

    Default

    As I said,
    Quote by rbminis View Post
    Some very good info has been posted on this thread showing my collection. A few more have been added since then.
    My small collection of Schützenschnur
    Ralph.
    You didn't even go and have a look, did you?
    Ralph.
    Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stamm. Kp. Pz. Erz. Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

  11. #10

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    Quote by BeauHarper View Post
    Thanks for all the wonderful responses! They have been very informative. I understand it for the most part but where I am stuck is did they just get the lanyard upon the first qualification then acorn for each re certification up to four? What happened after the fourth? As Walkwolf says grades 1-4 above. Also is there an exact date that the second model (one pictured) was issued from and until what date?
    You really shold have a look at Ralph's link. Still:

    There were three different designs of badge worn on the lanyard which, together with the number of acorns (for small arms) or artillery shells (for artillery and tanks' turret guns) attached to the lanyard, identified the grade:

    Grade 1 to 4:
    Badge: Originally, an aluminum-colored shield with the Wehrmacht eagle. In 1939, it was replaced by the pattern seen in your original post.
    Acorns/shells: Aluminum-colored, numbering from 0 (grade 1) to 3 (grade 4).

    Grade 5 to 8:
    Badge: An aluminum-colored badge with crossed swords on a pebbled shield surrounded by a wreath of oakleaves and topped by a Wehrmacht eagle. In other words, the same elements as the second-model badge for grades 1- 4, but of different proportions with longer and more massive swords and a broader wreath.
    Acorns/shells: Aluminum-colored, numbering from 0 (grade 5) to 3 (grade 8).

    Grade 9 to 12:

    Badge: As grade 5 - 8, but gold-colored. The lanyard also had gold-colored slides.
    Acorns/shells: gold-colored, numbering from 0 (grade 9) to 3 (grade 12).

    The successively higher grades were attained by annual re-qualification for the lanyard. (So, normally, it would have taken 12 years of consistently good marksmanship achievements to reach the highest grade.) However, previously-attained Reichswehr shooting badges (and, following the annexations of 1938/1939, those of the Austrian and Czech armies) were also recognized toward the number of qualifications.

    The shooting lanyard was introduced with an order of 29th June 1936. The second-pattern badge for grades 1 - 4 was introduced with an order of 9th January 1939. Further awards were discontinued for the duration of the war with an order of 14th Feb. 1941 (already-awareded lanyards could still be worn, of course).

    Oh, and special lanyard badges for tank units were introduced with an order of 17th Oct. 1938, featuring a tank instead of the shield-and-swords device.

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