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When did the Red Army/Soviet Army adopt...

Article about: ...the ribbon bar method of displaying awards? I am curious if such a ribbon bar is correct for use on a GPW era uniform? Was it used in lieu of displaying the medals, or in conjunction with

  1. #1

    Default When did the Red Army/Soviet Army adopt...

    ...the ribbon bar method of displaying awards?

    I am curious if such a ribbon bar is correct for use on a GPW era uniform? Was it used in lieu of displaying the medals, or in conjunction with the display of medals.

    Was it only used on dress, or parade uniforms (which is what the photographic evidence tends to suggest)?

    Any information is appreciated.

    Spaceba

    Boridin
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  3. #2

    Default Re: When did the Red Army/Soviet Army adopt...

    19 June 1943

    I do not own, or have seen any period images of them being worn in combat - only on service/everyday wear; postwar.
    .

    Fellow collectors are NOT adversaries to be bested...

    ☭ "Ричик, я не понимаю, почему, почему ты тратишь деньги на эти вещи!" ☭

  4. #3

    Default Re: When did the Red Army/Soviet Army adopt...

    Richie;

    I agree, I have seen no evidence that they were worn on combat uniforms. do you know if they were worn in lieu of medals, or in conjunction with?

    Spaceba

    Boridin

  5. #4
    comrade coffin
    ?

    Default Re: When did the Red Army/Soviet Army adopt...

    In Alexander Pyl'cyn's memoir 'Penalty Strike', he mentions the fact that he knew the award(s?) of an officer sent to his straffbat by the medal ribbon(s?) on his uniform. The incident took place in the late war period. However, he does not mention whether the uniform was combat fatigues, or parade, although it seems unlikely that a sentenced officer would be sent to a penal battalion in his kitel & galiffes. I shall try & dig out the book form my tottering piles of literature & type the exact text into this post.

  6. #5

    Default Re: When did the Red Army/Soviet Army adopt...

    Here is the only image I have found with them in use on a field uniform. IMO, definitely postwar...
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    .

    Fellow collectors are NOT adversaries to be bested...

    ☭ "Ричик, я не понимаю, почему, почему ты тратишь деньги на эти вещи!" ☭

  7. #6
    ?

    Default Re: When did the Red Army/Soviet Army adopt...

    Quote by RedHorseman25 View Post
    ...the ribbon bar method of displaying awards?

    I am curious if such a ribbon bar is correct for use on a GPW era uniform? Was it used in lieu of displaying the medals, or in conjunction with the display of medals.
    I could have sworn I've seen a few GPW-era photos of ribbon bars in wear, but if Richie says "no" than no it is; he's got a lot more experience than I. Of the photo's I have seen the bars are always worn in lieu of medals.
    The 'capture of' medals were instituted after the war was over (well, technically not because Japan had not surrendured yet) so I'd guess that there's a .01% chance a bar like that could be worn during war time. But considering it's apparent condition I'd expect it would have been made up in the last 20 years (or days).

  8. #7

    Default Re: When did the Red Army/Soviet Army adopt...

    Quote by RichieC View Post
    Here is the only image I have found with them in use on a field uniform. IMO, definitely postwar...
    Quote by RichieC View Post
    19 June 1943

    I do not own, or have seen any period images of them being worn in combat - only on service/everyday wear; postwar.
    Again, this is ONLY from my experiences - It is entirely possible that these were used during wartime and in combat conditions. Perhaps someday, one of you all, somebody else, or even myself may come across evidence pointing to this...
    .

    Fellow collectors are NOT adversaries to be bested...

    ☭ "Ричик, я не понимаю, почему, почему ты тратишь деньги на эти вещи!" ☭

  9. #8
    ?

    Default Re: When did the Red Army/Soviet Army adopt...

    Ya know, one would naturally assume that the troopers, especially those on the front lines, would rather have a small bar instead of big medals that jingle and jangle, reflect sunlight and get caught on webgear and branches.
    But I think the reality of the Soviet side is that the be-medaled troopers, especially the enlisted men didn't have the cash to buy ribbonbars, even if they were available at the front. I also think they were expected to wear any decorations awarded by the State as propaganda of the State.
    And not only that I think that the Soviet troopers were extremely proud of defending their homeland and wore their decorations with pride.
    At least that's the vibe I get.

  10. #9

    Default Re: When did the Red Army/Soviet Army adopt...

    Well I know from my conversations with Ivan, the vet who told me about the unit he was in, that his Regiments policy was that NO ONE was to wear any medals, awards, or decorations on their field uniforms. The only exception was wound stripes. As a Mounted unit, the concern was that the medals would glint, and draw sniper fire.

    Now they did allow a trooper to wear his newly awarded medal(s) for the day that they were awarded, but that was usually in the rear anyway, so the sniper issue was not as much of a concern. By the next day, they were to be off the uniform. Most of the troopers had small wooden boxes, in which they carried all their medals, and the supporting documents, and they kept them either in their saddlebags, or in their meshok, or similar ruck.

    When the various troops (units, not individuals) were withdrawn from the front for animal maintenence, the troops (individuals, not units) would be allowed to display all awards, and decorations, after the uniform had been cleaned, and passed inspection. This was to honor the sanctity of the awards. No awards (other than the wound stripes) were to be displayed on a dirty uniform.

    Now, again, this is a Regimental policy, of a Ukrainian Territorial Defense Army unit, not necessarily the policy of the overall Red Army, or even the overall policy of the Ukrainian Territorial Defense Army.

    Boridin

  11. #10

    Default Re: When did the Red Army/Soviet Army adopt...

    Just as an aside, Ivan also told me that unlike Russian units, wound stripes were issued once. IE, one red, and/or gold stripe. If the recipient was granted a subsequent award, then a numeral was awarded, not an additional stripe.

    This meant that you might have one red, and one gold stripe, then numerals to annotate subsequent awards.

    Boridin

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