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Is it illegal to buy medals?

Article about: Is it illegal to buy WW2 medals as a collector? I've heard some stuff about the Stolen Valor Act. Anyone have information? Thanks

  1. #1
    m85xxx
    ?

    Default Is it illegal to buy medals?

    Is it illegal to buy WW2 medals as a collector?
    I've heard some stuff about the Stolen Valor Act.
    Anyone have information?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    ?

    Default Re: Is it illegal to buy medals?

    the stolen valor act was introduced in the US only as far as i know as there were to many accounts of people trying to pass them selves off as war vets but its still legal to by WW2 medals out side of the US ??

  3. #3
    m85xxx
    ?

    Default Re: Is it illegal to buy medals?

    Hmm.
    I was going to start collecting WW2 medals as a hobby but now I'm not sure if buying falls under the Stolen Valor Act. Guess I will just wait to start my collecting

  4. #4

    Default Re: Is it illegal to buy medals?

    As NickD says, it pertains to US citizens buying or selling Valour medals,
    such as the 'Congressional Medal Of Honor', but the range has
    broadened lately. I think that the law was passed to stop
    people from claiming to be decorated heroes.

    There are still many sellers of US medals in and outside of the US.
    And the law would probably be enforced only if there were
    suspicious or fraudluent activity.

    I have a few recent US Navy Crosses that were purchased
    out of Austrailia. These are the second highest USN award.
    Regards,


    Steve.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Is it illegal to buy medals?

    Your worrys are for naught m85. The federal act 18 U.S.C. 704 was passed on 12/06/06. It originally covered only the Medal of Honor and through the years extra provisions have been tacked on that actually do make it illegal to own, transport, sell, bargain, or trade, a variety of U.S. medals. However, the additional provisions have never been passed by the U.S. House or Senate. It was administrative incentives added by the Justice Department. The intent of the law was to keep people who had not earned the Medal of Honor, Bronze Stars etc. from wearing them. Since it's inception, there have been about 60 people charged under this law. Each one of the prosecuted individuals either actually wore one of the medals or claimed in public they had earned the medal when they had not. There are currently 12 appeals against this law in various Federal Appelate Courts. Stay tuned. No one has been charged for merely collecting these medals. Just don't say you earned the darned thing and you will be golden. Now if you are the nervous nelly type, don't collect them. Hope that helps.

    Take care,
    Jay

  6. #6

    Default Re: Is it illegal to buy medals?

    Please read below. You will find that all of the fear relating to this bill is unreasonable, unfounded and unnecessary.

    Here is the text of conversation from Senator Conrad, who initiated the bill:

    Senator Conrad, Senate sponsor of the Stolen valor Act, read the following statement into the Congressional Record on 27 Feb.

    Statement of Senator Kent Conrad
    February 27, 2007

    MR. CONRAD: Mr. President, I would like to comment today on the Stolen Valor Act of 2005 that was signed into law by President Bush on December 20, 2006. I am extremely proud of authoring the Senate version of this legislation that ultimately became law. The new law that has resulted from the Stolen Valor Act strengthens and expands the protections for our Armed Forces’ military service awards and decorations.

    Since the Stolen Valor Act was signed into law, there have been reports of concerns raised by medals collectors, historians, museums, family members that inherit medals, and persons legitimately possessing, shipping, or selling military service awards and decorations. I would like to make it clear for the Record that the intent and effect of my legislation and the resulting law is only to provide the tools law enforcement need to prosecute those fraudulently using military service awards they did not earn through service to our Armed Forces. It does not in any way restrict legitimate possession, use, shipment, or display of these awards and decorations.

    Before the law was enacted, my legislation was reviewed by the Senate Judiciary Committee, the House Judiciary Committee, the Department of Justice, and the Congressional Research Service’s American Law Division. All concluded that the Stolen Valor legislation does not negatively impact those legitimately in possession of military service awards and decorations.
    Although the new law modifies Title 18 USC, Section 704, it does not impact the legitimate purchase, sale, or possession of medals. The key part of this passage is the phrase: "except when authorized under regulations made pursuant to law." That exception refers to 32 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Section 507. I believe the concerns raised by collectors and dealers of military medals and memorabilia may stem from lack of familiarity with the CFR and its relationship to statutory law. The CFR is the regulation that implements and administers statutory provisions, in this case, the provisions of 18 USC Section 704 as amended by the Stolen Valor Act.
    The CFR specifically states in Section 507.12 “Mere possession by a person of any of the articles prescribed in Sec. 507.8 of this part is authorized provided that such possession is not used to defraud or misrepresent the identification or status of the individuals concerned.” According to numerous legal experts consulted on the drafting of the Stolen Valor legislation, “mere possession” would include: family members that inherit medals, museums, collectors, approved medals dealers, historians, and other persons in possession or selling medals that do not use them for fraudulent purposes. In addition, CFR Sec. 507.8(a) indicates, “the articles listed in paragraphs (a) (1) through (10) of this section are authorized for manufacture and sale when made in accordance with approved specifications, purchase descriptions or drawings.”

    The articles listed as authorized for manufacture and sale in Sec. 507.8(a) include: decorations, service medals, ribbons, lapel buttons, and badges with the exception of the Medal of Honor. The CFR allows for the sale of all US medals (except the Medal of Honor) and insignia, provided that an official government manufacturer has made them and that the Institute of Heraldry (IOH) approved those pieces. Thus, the Stolen Valor Act does not in any way stop collectors or dealers from selling or collecting officially made medals and insignia, whether they were made yesterday or fifty years ago.

    I ask Unanimous Consent that a memo from the American Law Division at Congressional Research Service supporting this analysis be included in the Record at the conclusion of my remarks.

    In closing, I again want to assure those legitimately in possession of, selling, displaying, or shipping military service awards that the Stolen Valor Act is only directed at those who fraudulently use military service awards and decorations.

    I have been to Walter Reed Hospital, Bethesda Naval Hospital, and have awarded numerous awards and decorations to soldiers and veterans. These brave men and women have given so much to ensure our freedoms. I strongly believe protecting the meaning and valor of military service awards is a very important way we can continue to honor their service and sacrifice. "
    __________________
    [B][COLOR=Black][SIZE=3][FONT=Book Antiqua][I] Steve[/I][/FONT][/SIZE][/COLOR][/B]

    [CENTER][I][FONT=Georgia][COLOR=orange]Did you ever get the feeling that the world was a tuxedo and you were a pair of brown shoes?[/COLOR][/FONT]
    [/I][/CENTER]
    [B]
    [SIZE=3][COLOR=lemonchiffon][I][CENTER][FONT=Georgia]"Fly on dear boy, from this dark world of strife. On to the promised land to eternal life"[/FONT][/CENTER]
    [/I][/COLOR][/SIZE][/B]

  7. #7

    Default Re: Is it illegal to buy medals?

    Hi Steven, hope all is well in my beloved Texas.* Although the CFR permits us mere mortals to posssess these medals, in reality the senate version of the bill that was passed specifically forbids it.* You can read the very short amended portion on Gov.Track.* That is where the problem arises.* Every rational person knows what their intent was, but what they wrote and passed in reality says something very different.* What can or can't a Federal Law Enforcement Agency charge someone with?* IMO unless there is fraud involved, they will never prosecute anyone, but here is what it says.* I know it's pretty dry but the verbaige is a killer.

    Section 3, subsection "a" 'Expansion of GENERAL CRIMINAL OFFENSE - Subsection (9) of section 704 of title 18, United States, is amended by striking "manufactures, or sells' and inserting 'purchases, attempts to purchase, solicites for purchase, mails, ships, imports, exports, produces blank certificates of receipt for, manufactures, sells, attempts to sell, advertise for sell, trades, barters, or exchanges anything of value.

    Once again, intentions did not become a reality with this bill. They were trying to do the noble thing but got alittle carried away. It's all a moot point unless you lie and say you won or wear a medal you didn't win.

    Take care,
    Jay

    I had a bunch of astericks show up, and I don't know why.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Is it illegal to buy medals?

    Howdy Jay,

    Thanks for the follow-up - some good points which I was not aware of. Guess I need some more learnin'.

    If you like humidity, "skeeders" and miserable heat, come on down next month...you'll be in heaven!
    [B][COLOR=Black][SIZE=3][FONT=Book Antiqua][I] Steve[/I][/FONT][/SIZE][/COLOR][/B]

    [CENTER][I][FONT=Georgia][COLOR=orange]Did you ever get the feeling that the world was a tuxedo and you were a pair of brown shoes?[/COLOR][/FONT]
    [/I][/CENTER]
    [B]
    [SIZE=3][COLOR=lemonchiffon][I][CENTER][FONT=Georgia]"Fly on dear boy, from this dark world of strife. On to the promised land to eternal life"[/FONT][/CENTER]
    [/I][/COLOR][/SIZE][/B]

  9. #9

    Default Re: Is it illegal to buy medals?

    You live in heaven Steve, you really do. Great people, good government, plus lots of cheap guns and ammo. You better not offer or I may just show up a knocken. I must admit, I had never seen the code of regulations you shared above. It sure is a mess when a bunch of lawyers get together to make new laws.

    Take care,
    Jay

  10. #10

    Default Re: Is it illegal to buy medals?

    My wife had a ribbon bar display made up for me, as an anniversary present, Our anniversary is Next month, and they did require a copy of my 214, she had to mail them a copy of my Member 4 copy , with all signatures on it, just so that they would make it up for her, Especially certain combat ribbons that i earned in Iraq.

    Shes doing the flag, and ribbon bar display with all of my awards ( jump wings,air assault wings, EIB badge, rigger badge and my combat action badge, and my multiple combat patches earned also.

    So i was happy to know that they ask for proof, and not just sell the ribbons to any wanna be idiots.

    Whats really crazy, i have more ribbons, then most officers have, since i was on my 3rd tour in Iraq, and did some time in Germany, and Korea also.



    Brian

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