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A guide to headstamps

Article about: I thought I would do a quick guide to cartridge headstamps. I know many of us are well aware of what all the stamps mean, but some people donít and I think it would be useful to those people

  1. #31

    Default Re: A guide to headstamps

    Try this link for German headstamp markings, 1888 to 1945. aghs
    K98k manufacturer's codes - Waffenamt - 7,92 headstamp markings and lot numbers - P codes


  2. #32
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    Default Re: A guide to headstamps

    r3jmk - there are a number of sources for information on German WWI codes in addition to the above. The following books all have a good deal of information;
    D.Kent - German 7.9mm Military Ammunition
    Brandt et al - Die 7.9mm Militarpatronen
    D.Storz - The 98 Rifle and Carbine

    German WWI headstamps are four position, with manufacturer, case material (S67), month and year.

    If the headstamp is divided into four with radial lines it means the bullet has an envelope of Tombak (gilding metal) and is cannelured and suitable for use in both rifle and machine gun. This was introduced around 1916 after it was found that the original uncannelured bullets sometimes set back causing jams in machine guns and also that their cupro-nickel envelopes caused excessive fouling.

    REgards
    TonyE
    British Military Smallarms and Ammunition
    Collector, Researcher and Pedant
    https://sites.google.com/site/britmilammo/

  3. #33

    Default Re: A guide to headstamps

    I have two 7.92 Mauser cartridges marked SS 1938 DWM and SS-VT 1938 DWM.

    I know DWM indicates manufacture by Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (German Weapons and Munitions Work), Berlin. I've read somewhere that the SS manufactured their own ammunition until 1941 or something like that. Does this mean that my SS cartridge style should only be dated pre-1941? Also the cases appear to be solid brass FWIW.

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  4. #34
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    Default Re: A guide to headstamps

    Great guide.

  5. #35
    ?

    Default Re: A guide to headstamps

    The SS did not make their own ammunition. As they were a separate political organisation and not part of the army they did not draw their ammunition from army supplies. Instead they contracted for their ammo from companies like DWM. Later they took over ammunition plants in occupied countries, particularly in Czechoslovakia and later still in the war the Waffen SS drew supplies through the normal army chain of supply.

    Specially headstamped rounds like the ones you show would all be pre 1941 as you say, and probably pre 1939. AFAIK there are no specially stamped SS headstamps on steel cases, only brass.

    All the above may be expanded by others as it is not my area of expertise!

    Regards
    TonyE
    British Military Smallarms and Ammunition
    Collector, Researcher and Pedant
    https://sites.google.com/site/britmilammo/

  6. #36
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    Default Re: A guide to headstamps

    Hi I have a case and the head stamp reads LM 43 and I understand this means it was manufactured by Lowell Ordnance plant MA but I have done some research in to this and all I can find is that they produced steel cases and the one I have seems to be made of brass can anyone shed any light on this?
    Regards Luke

  7. #37
    ?

    Default Re: A guide to headstamps

    Sorry to be so late getting back to answer this question!

    Lowell Ordnance Plant was one of the "4th Wave" plants set up by the US government but operated by Remington Arms Co. Originally planned to make .30 calibre ammunition this was changed to .50 calibre before production began.

    It came on line in November 1942 making brass cased ammo (ball and AP) and in early 1943 started to convert to steel cases. The first steel cased .50 cal. were made in February 1943 and by July that year all brass cased production had halted. Production finished completely in December 1943 by which time the plant had made 71.5 million rounds.

    Whilst not rare, your brass LM case is far less common than most US WW2 .50 cal. cases.

    REgards
    TonyE
    British Military Smallarms and Ammunition
    Collector, Researcher and Pedant
    https://sites.google.com/site/britmilammo/

  8. #38

    Default Re: A guide to headstamps

    I have similar rounds. Mine were for the 8mm Mauser rifle used by the German police at home. The V111 stands for 8mm and the 19 and 38 is the date of
    manufacture. Mine came in a cardboard box which contained 2 stripper clips of 5 rounds each. Beautiful headstamps and matching gold bullets.

  9. #39
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    Default Re: A guide to headstamps

    It sounds like the ammo you have is 8x56R for the Steyr straight-pull rifle from Austria,can you post a picture ?
    JEDEM DAS SEINE

  10. #40
    ?

    Default Re: A guide to headstamps

    I agree with zwerge. It sounds like August (VIII) 1938 production of 8x56R.

    Is the ammo you have rimmed or rimless?

    "8mm" is not a term the Germans used as a calibre designation, it is very much an American description.

    Regards
    TonyE
    British Military Smallarms and Ammunition
    Collector, Researcher and Pedant
    https://sites.google.com/site/britmilammo/

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